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By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1997
The theme running through speeches at an oratory contest given by the Department of Juvenile Justice in Middle River yesterday was that the failure to recognize one's mistakes leads to repeating them.It was just the kind of message contest organizers had hoped to hear.The contest, in its third year, offers proof, department officials say, that youthful offenders can have useful lives."These are talented, productive people, who just need to be put on the right track," said juvenile justice Superintendent Charles F. Stewart Jr. "We must remember that these are still youths."
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NEWS
By Ivan Leshinsky | October 1, 2014
The number of young people arrested and brought to the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services (DJS) is down drastically over the past 10 years. Fewer juveniles are being placed in secure detention facilities, and plans for construction of a new juvenile jail in Baltimore City have been shelved, at least temporarily. Some contend that the reduction in the numbers of youth charged and detained is more about revised policing policies than anything else. We've seen the end of zero tolerance, and "youth connection centers" (YCCs)
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NEWS
December 13, 1991
Four juveniles were reported missing yesterday at 7:50 p.m. from the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School, a juvenile detention facility in Baltimore County, officials said. Three of the youths were immediately picked up, Department of Juvenile Services spokeswoman Jacqueline Lampell said. The search continues for the fourth.
NEWS
February 28, 2013
The independent watchdog agency that oversees Maryland's Department of Juvenile Services recently released a report showing the state made important progress last year toward improving conditions for youths held in its three largest juvenile detention facilities. That's good news given the years of problems the system has encountered with overcrowding, incidents of violence, high staff turnover and aging facilities. Now the state needs to build on those gains by replicating the successful programs at its largest institutions in smaller facilities statewide.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun Reporter | June 7, 2008
In a bathroom of the Thomas O'Farrell Youth Center in Carroll County this week, one boy choked another, causing him to fall unconscious and hit his head. The victim was flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center with a brain injury. Workers at the facility first reported what happened as an accident. Now several state agencies are trying to determine why. Thomas O'Farrell, a medium-security residence for juvenile delinquents in Marriottsville, is run by a private firm under a contract with the Department of Juvenile Services.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN REPORTER | August 5, 2008
A Nevada company that recently purchased the grounds of the Bowling Brook Preparatory School - a Carroll County youth lockup that was shuttered last year after a Baltimore boy died there - has applied for a state license to operate a juvenile program. Rite of Passage has been working for months to open a privately run facility for young offenders - a move that some advocates have said could contradict the state's new approach to treating juvenile delinquents in small residential settings.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 9, 2001
State police are investigating reports that a guard at a Maryland juvenile detention center stabbed a teen-ager during a confrontation that began in the breakfast line, authorities said yesterday. The youth suffered a wound to his upper back but was not seriously injured. The guard has been suspended with pay. Few details about the incident, which occurred New Year's Day at the Cheltenham Youth Facility in Prince George's County, were available yesterday. Investigators hope to have a clearer idea of what occurred in a few days, said Bob Kannenberg, spokesman for the state Department of Juvenile Justice.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON | June 25, 2006
Two employees were fired last week from a Department of Juvenile Services Eastern Shore facility for failing to follow proper procedures after learning that two youths had engaged in a sex act in a classroom, the department said. The employees became aware that a 15-year-old boy and a 16-year-old girl had sexual intercourse as a film was shown in a darkened classroom on Tuesday but failed to report the incident for several hours, delaying an investigation, said Edward Hopkins, a department spokesman.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 13, 2001
SABILLASVILLE - Maryland Department of Juvenile Justice officials have confirmed that some troubled teens were allowed to settle disputes in staged fights at a juvenile facility in northwest Frederick County. Two staff members at the Victor Cullen Center were fired as a result of the agency's investigation into allegations they ran a "Saturday Morning Fight Club." Another staff member resigned and action is pending against a fourth who is on sick leave, according to Lee Towers, a spokesman for the juvenile justice agency.
NEWS
October 31, 2000
A 15-year-old student was charged with initiating a false fire alarm yesterday morning at South Carroll High School, authorities said. During questioning, the student, whose name was not released, admitted to pulling a fire alarm at 8:05 a.m. The alarm prompted the fire department to respond and forced school officials to evacuate the building, the state fire marshal reported. The student was transferred to authorities at the Department of Juvenile Justice. Initiating a false fire alarm has a penalty of five years in prison and a $5,000 fine.
NEWS
February 8, 2011
Sam Abed, Gov. Martin O'Malley's choice to lead the state's troubled Department of Juvenile Services, is a young man with lots of energy and fresh ideas about how to meet the needs of troubled youth — but not a lot of experience actually doing it. Mr. Abed, 35, is a former prosecutor and juvenile justice official from Virginia, where he served just under five years as deputy director of Virginia's Juvenile Justice Agency, which is part of...
NEWS
November 21, 2010
The departure of Donald DeVore marks the end of yet another secretary who has failed to turn around Maryland's most troubled agency, the Department of Juvenile Services. Mr. DeVore announced Thursday that he would not seek reappointment and was considering career opportunities outside the state. His withdrawal perhaps just saves Gov. Martin O'Malley from having to fire him so that the department, which has been plagued by persistent organizational and security problems, can finally begin to move ahead.
NEWS
February 28, 2010
The shocking slaying of a 65-year-old teacher at the Cheltenham Youth Facility in Prince George's County was a wake-up call to the risk of workplace violence faced by state workers at such institutions. The body of Hannah Wheeling, who had taught youths at the troubled institution since 2004, was found more than a week ago near the parking lot of the building where she worked. Police have identified a 13-year-old boy as a suspect. This isn't the first time Cheltenham has drawn attention.
NEWS
January 17, 2010
Last year the state Department of Juvenile Services served some 53,000 troubled youths and their families, most for minor violations that never make the headlines. But a handful of the department's toughest cases did raise serious questions over whether officials there were on top of things. Last summer saw a violent incident at the Victor Cullen Center, the state's flagship secure juvenile treatment facility, in which several youngsters managed to escape after injuring staff members.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Nicole Fuller and Andrea F. Siegel and Nicole Fuller,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | August 12, 2009
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold is asking state officials to step up their watch on a facility for troubled youths after a firefighter who responded to a false alarm was hit in the face with a plastic pipe - the latest of hundreds of police and fire calls there. "We want to make sure these facilities are held accountable," Leopold said Tuesday. He said he was troubled by the assault on a firefighter responding to an intentional false alarm at the shelter and group home outside Annapolis, and believed the overall number of police and fire calls there - more than 500 in about three and a half years - was "inordinate."
NEWS
By Anthony J. O'Donnell | July 28, 2009
In May 2005, then-Mayor Martin O'Malley announced a 10-point plan to reform Maryland's juvenile justice system. He told Marylanders that "the community deserves juvenile justice that is responsive, effective and accountable to the public." Now, more than four years later and almost three years into his term as governor, the juvenile justice system in Maryland remains, as it was described in the O'Malley transition report, dangerously dysfunctional. Two years ago, Mr. O'Malley appointed Connecticut's juvenile justice director, Donald W. DeVore, to head Maryland's Department of Juvenile Services.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 10, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- When a private contractor took over the state's facility for juvenile delinquents, it kept the fences, but it may not have kept the right to prosecute youths who won't stay behind them.About 23 young men have escaped from the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School since it was transferred Sept. 1 to the Colorado-based Rebound Inc. All have been charged with felonies, Jacqui Lampel, a Department of Juvenile Services spokeswoman, said yesterday.But an emergency Senate bill, heard yesterday by the Judicial Proceedings Committee, asks that Hickey be defined as a "place of confinement," so that escapees can be charged with felonies.
NEWS
By Staff Reports | November 22, 1992
A 17-year-old youth jumped from a car being driven by a staff member yesterday as they were returning to the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School for young criminal offenders in Baltimore fTC County, the third escape in a week.The youth and the staff member were returning from a recreational outing about 5:30 p.m. when the youth jumped out of the car at the intersection of Cub Hill and Old Harford roads, said Carol Hyman, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Juvenile Services.On Friday, three youths overpowered a worker, took her keys and fled the facility in her car. On Tuesday night, a counselor received serious head injuries after being attacked by a youth in a melee that led to the escape of four teen-agers.
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