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By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2004
The U.S. Department of Justice will open a probe into the death of a black Pasadena teenager, Noah Jamahl Jones, who died in a brawl between his group of African-American friends and a group of white youths outside a party in July. Department of Justice spokesman Eric Holland said yesterday that officials would not comment beyond confirming that the agency's civil rights division is initiating the investigation after a request from the Anne Arundel County chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
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NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The U.S. Department of Justice will conduct a civil rights investigation into allegations of brutality and misconduct by the Baltimore Police Department, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts announced Friday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Batts requested the probe after a six-month investigation by The Baltimore Sun found city residents have suffered battered faces and broken bones during arrests . The city has paid $5.7 million in court judgments and settlements in 102 cases since 2011, and nearly all of the people who received payouts were cleared of criminal charges, according to the investigation published this week.
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NEWS
November 23, 2008
Now that it has switched to transition mode, the once famously close-mouthed camp of Barack Obama is spouting a gusher of leaks, feelers and trial balloons about possible Cabinet appointments. Sen. Hillary Clinton has been touted as secretary of state, Lawrence Summers to again lead Treasury, and Tom Daschle, the former Senate majority leader, for Health and Human Services. But the agency most in need of rehabilitation may be the beleaguered Department of Justice, whose reputation suffered grievously over the last eight years.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
According to the state public safety department, there's been 11 assaults in the Baltimore City Detention Center's youth annex this year. Yet in court, a 17-year-old who stands just 5-foot-1 and weighs less than 110 pounds, testified under oath that he alone had been beaten up some six times in a matter of a few weeks - attacked in his sleep by other youths in the 16-to-32-to-a-cage living areas for youth being held on adult charges. Others, in a series of hearings viewed by The Sun, told similar stories, and said they were threatened with more attacks if they told.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times Syndicate | November 30, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The Department of Justice turned off the United States' only satellite pornography network yesterday, obtaining an agreement from its owners to plead guilty to felony obscenity charges and to cease operations.The American Exxxstasy station was pioneering a potential new market by broadcasting hard-core adult movies daily to 30,000 nationwide subscribers equipped with their own satellite dishes. The service cost $300 a year.Department of Justice officials said that the proliferation of cable and satellite dish technology had made it necessary to strike quickly at the "pollution" of public airwaves before such enterprises spread.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 16, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Outgoing Attorney General William P. Barr reflecting on his tenure under President Bush, is calling for eliminating the federal drug czar's office and for insisting on "full cooperation" of Latin American countries in the drug war."I don't think it works to superimpose someone who doesn't have substantial operating resources over those agencies that do," he said yesterday in an interview. "You can't have a staff function serving as commander in chief" in fighting drugs.Drug czar Bob Martinez coordinates the activities of other agencies but does not have a staff of his own directly engaged in combating drugs.
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 26, 2000
As expected, the U.S. Department of Justice has notified the Salt Lake Organizing Committee for the 2002 Winter Games that it will not be prosecuted for its corporate role in the worst corruption scandal in Olympic history, officials said yesterday. In a letter dated May 12 that was received Wednesday, the department said it has "no present intention" of seeking an indictment of the nonprofit corporation. It's typically much tougher in court to prove corporate - as opposed to individual - liability for alleged criminal conduct.
NEWS
By ROBERT A. LEVY | March 8, 1998
Good and bad news from Microsoft hearings last week before the Senate Judiciary Committee: Microsoft Corp., its allies and its rivals agree that there's no need for further antitrust legislation tailored specifically for high-tech industries. That's the good news. But it leaves the Department of Justice's Antitrust Division with a large role to play whenever it perceives that a company has acquired "too much" market power and is behaving in an "anti-competitive" manner. That's the bad news.
NEWS
By TIM RUTTEN | June 19, 1992
This is about memory and truth, about history and justice, and about our daunting but unavoidable duty to knit them into an intelligible whole.In the late 1970s, an embarrassed U.S. government was forced to admit that, in the anxious, early days of the Cold War, it had admitted to this country thousands of Central and Eastern European immigrants guilty of war crimes. A few were Germans; most were people of other nations -- Balts, Ukrainians, Croats, Slovaks, Circassians -- who had cooperated with the Nazis in their persecution of Jews and other religious and ethnic minorities.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- FBI Director William S. Sessions yesterday dismissed as riddled with "errors in fact and mistaken conclusions" a highly critical Department of Justice report that accused him of using his office for personal gain.In a three-page statement, drawn up with the help of his private attorneys, Mr. Sessions said that he had conducted himself "in accordance with the law and with uncompromised ethical standards" and that he "will continue to do so."By rejecting the results of the investigation, which were accepted by former Attorney General William P. Barr on his last day in office Friday, Mr. Sessions was in the highly unusual position of challenging the orders of his immediate superior.
NEWS
November 23, 2008
Now that it has switched to transition mode, the once famously close-mouthed camp of Barack Obama is spouting a gusher of leaks, feelers and trial balloons about possible Cabinet appointments. Sen. Hillary Clinton has been touted as secretary of state, Lawrence Summers to again lead Treasury, and Tom Daschle, the former Senate majority leader, for Health and Human Services. But the agency most in need of rehabilitation may be the beleaguered Department of Justice, whose reputation suffered grievously over the last eight years.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 24, 2007
An open letter to Marvin L. "Doc" Cheatham, president of the Baltimore NAACP chapter: Dear Mr. Cheatham: This letter is in response to the e-mail you sent to Baltimore news media outlets Nov. 16. You chided us for not covering the march on the U.S. Department of Justice that same day. Several civil rights groups -- including the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People -- and many individuals marched to protest what they perceive as...
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | January 18, 2007
The agreement that Maryland prison officials reached with the U.S. Department of Justice this week gives the state four more years to make fixes at the Baltimore City jail, sets up a monitoring process for making improvements and could stave off costly litigation between the state and federal government. If the state hasn't "substantially complied" with the agreement after four years, the Department of Justice can pursue litigation, according to a memorandum made public yesterday. The department's investigation of the state-run jail began in 2000 and has spanned two gubernatorial administrations.
NEWS
October 17, 2006
Joseph C. Gatto, a retired U.S. Department of Justice employee and sports fan, died of cancer Wednesday at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The longtime Crofton resident was 62. Mr. Gatto was born in Scranton, Pa., and raised in Old Forge, Pa. He earned an associate's degree in 1964 from Lackawanna Community College in Scranton. Until his retirement in 2003, Mr. Justice was a student loan specialist in the debt consolidation department at the Justice Department in Washington. He was a member and past grand knight and faithful navigator of the Knights of Columbus.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - Attorney General John Ashcroft, one of the most divisive attorneys general in decades who presided over a department at the forefront of the war on terror, resigned yesterday, saying his "objective of securing the safety of Americans from crime and terror has been achieved." In a five-page handwritten letter, he wrote: "I believe that the Department of Justice would be well served by new leadership and fresh inspiration. I believe that my energies and talents should be directed toward other challenging horizons."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2004
The U.S. Department of Justice will open a probe into the death of a black Pasadena teenager, Noah Jamahl Jones, who died in a brawl between his group of African-American friends and a group of white youths outside a party in July. Department of Justice spokesman Eric Holland said yesterday that officials would not comment beyond confirming that the agency's civil rights division is initiating the investigation after a request from the Anne Arundel County chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
NEWS
February 4, 1994
President Clinton's choice to head the long-leaderless Civil Rights Division at the Department of Justice seems an excellent one, judged by his professional and personal history. Deval Patrick rose from very humble surroundings to over-achiever status at Harvard Law School and then, after litigating cases for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, made partner at an establishment Boston law firm which has given Massachusetts two recent governors, one a liberal Democrat and the other a conservative Republican.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Outlining a major policy shift, Attorney General William P. Barr said yesterday that the Department of Justice will be "receptive" to states' efforts to remove court-ordered population caps at overcrowded prisons.Mr. Barr, in a hard-line speech to the California District Attorneys Association in Palm Springs, Calif., said that many federal judges went too far in the 1970s and 1980s in deciding what the Constitution requires to remedy purported "cruel and unusual punishment" in prisons.
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 26, 2000
As expected, the U.S. Department of Justice has notified the Salt Lake Organizing Committee for the 2002 Winter Games that it will not be prosecuted for its corporate role in the worst corruption scandal in Olympic history, officials said yesterday. In a letter dated May 12 that was received Wednesday, the department said it has "no present intention" of seeking an indictment of the nonprofit corporation. It's typically much tougher in court to prove corporate - as opposed to individual - liability for alleged criminal conduct.
NEWS
By ROBERT A. LEVY | March 8, 1998
Good and bad news from Microsoft hearings last week before the Senate Judiciary Committee: Microsoft Corp., its allies and its rivals agree that there's no need for further antitrust legislation tailored specifically for high-tech industries. That's the good news. But it leaves the Department of Justice's Antitrust Division with a large role to play whenever it perceives that a company has acquired "too much" market power and is behaving in an "anti-competitive" manner. That's the bad news.
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