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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
Advocates for Maryland's abused and neglected youths said Wednesday that the state's second-largest foster care placement company failed the children in its care by allowing the qualification assessments of the homes they live in to lapse. Ed Kilcullen, director for Maryland's network of Court Appointed Special Advocates, said he is alarmed that the Hyattsville-based Contemporary Family Services did not document annual recertification for some of its homes, including providing up-to-date records such as criminal background clearances.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Josephine Atwater, a retired state Department of Human Resources employee who was a founding member of the Renaissance Institute at Notre Dame of Maryland University, died of cancer Thursday at her Halethorpe home. She was 89. Born Josephine Louise McNulty in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Thomas Aloysius McNulty, an Army Corps of Engineers employee, and Catherine Louise Gempp McNulty, who worked at American Can Co. Raised on Poplar Grove Street, she was a 1942 graduate of the Institute of Notre Dame and earned a bachelor of arts degree at Notre Dame of Maryland University after attending Mount St. Agnes Junior College.
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NEWS
March 18, 2010
T he death of 1-month-old Rajahnthon Haynie, whose body was recovered from Druid Hill Park on Sunday, presents yet another incident of child abuse that raises the inevitable question: Might this tragedy have been avoided? In a peculiar twist of fate, a law approved by the General Assembly just last year may make help prevent such horrors in the future - but it needs to be strengthened now. Lakesha Haynie, the infant boy's 28-year-old mother, has been charged with first-degree murder in his death.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
Maryland's new labor secretary will be Leonard Howie, an official at the state Department of Human Resources, the state said Monday. Gov. Martin O'Malley said in a statement that he was "confident in Leonard's ability to connect Marylanders with the jobs and skills they need to compete. " Howie steps into his new job Oct. 8. Former Labor Secretary Alexander M. Sanchez left in May to work for Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, with Scott R. Jensen filling in as interim secretary since then.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2010
Maryland Department of Human Resources Secretary Brenda Donald will step down from her position next month to accept a job with the Annie E. Casey Foundation, a move the former Casey fellow said feels like going home. Donald spent more than three years as DHR secretary, focusing on decreasing the number of children living in group homes and finding work for people receiving welfare and child support payments. Donald will become the vice president of the Center for Effective Family Services and Systems, where she will formulate policies for disadvantaged children on a national level.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Josephine Atwater, a retired state Department of Human Resources employee who was a founding member of the Renaissance Institute at Notre Dame of Maryland University, died of cancer Thursday at her Halethorpe home. She was 89. Born Josephine Louise McNulty in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Thomas Aloysius McNulty, an Army Corps of Engineers employee, and Catherine Louise Gempp McNulty, who worked at American Can Co. Raised on Poplar Grove Street, she was a 1942 graduate of the Institute of Notre Dame and earned a bachelor of arts degree at Notre Dame of Maryland University after attending Mount St. Agnes Junior College.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | January 31, 2006
The state Department of Human Resources' plan to deny Evershine Residential Services a license to care for troubled youths has been backed by an administrative law judge who said the firm had violated numerous state regulations. Judge William J.D. Somerville III in an opinion dated last Thursday, cited Evershine's failure to develop plans to care for each youth in its care, to make sure the staff lacked criminal records, to employ a full-time social worker and to report serious incidents, such as one child slashing a neighbor with a knife.
NEWS
By Brenda Donald | July 22, 2010
At the beginning of the O'Malley-Brown administration, Maryland had far too many children in foster care, too many foster children in group homes and too few foster parents. The law virtually required the Department of Human Resources to license any new group home meeting minimum standards, despite the fact that most of the state was already oversaturated with group homes. Our procedures for processing applications for social service programs were outdated and inefficient. It had been more than 20 years since the law was changed to update the amount of child support a parent had to pay. We knew our reforms would require a steady commitment, patience, tenacity and a willingness to challenge the status quo. We faced budget cuts, staff shortages and a skeptical group of advocates — most of whom were unconvinced that a historically troubled and underfunded agency could make real progress.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
Maryland officials plan to announce this week whether the state will sever ties with the state's second-largest foster care provider, a decision that also could determine whether the company keeps its contract in the District of Columbia. Officials with the Maryland Department of Human Resources, the agency charged with protecting the state's 7,400 foster children, is expected to announce a decision on renewing the license for Contemporary Family Services. The Hyattsville company's contract in D.C. depends on it retaining its Maryland license, according to officials with the District of Columbia's Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
Maryland's new labor secretary will be Leonard Howie, an official at the state Department of Human Resources, the state said Monday. Gov. Martin O'Malley said in a statement that he was "confident in Leonard's ability to connect Marylanders with the jobs and skills they need to compete. " Howie steps into his new job Oct. 8. Former Labor Secretary Alexander M. Sanchez left in May to work for Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, with Scott R. Jensen filling in as interim secretary since then.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
Maryland officials plan to announce this week whether the state will sever ties with the state's second-largest foster care provider, a decision that also could determine whether the company keeps its contract in the District of Columbia. Officials with the Maryland Department of Human Resources, the agency charged with protecting the state's 7,400 foster children, is expected to announce a decision on renewing the license for Contemporary Family Services. The Hyattsville company's contract in D.C. depends on it retaining its Maryland license, according to officials with the District of Columbia's Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
Advocates for Maryland's abused and neglected youths said Wednesday that the state's second-largest foster care placement company failed the children in its care by allowing the qualification assessments of the homes they live in to lapse. Ed Kilcullen, director for Maryland's network of Court Appointed Special Advocates, said he is alarmed that the Hyattsville-based Contemporary Family Services did not document annual recertification for some of its homes, including providing up-to-date records such as criminal background clearances.
NEWS
By Brenda Donald | July 22, 2010
At the beginning of the O'Malley-Brown administration, Maryland had far too many children in foster care, too many foster children in group homes and too few foster parents. The law virtually required the Department of Human Resources to license any new group home meeting minimum standards, despite the fact that most of the state was already oversaturated with group homes. Our procedures for processing applications for social service programs were outdated and inefficient. It had been more than 20 years since the law was changed to update the amount of child support a parent had to pay. We knew our reforms would require a steady commitment, patience, tenacity and a willingness to challenge the status quo. We faced budget cuts, staff shortages and a skeptical group of advocates — most of whom were unconvinced that a historically troubled and underfunded agency could make real progress.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2010
Maryland Department of Human Resources Secretary Brenda Donald will step down from her position next month to accept a job with the Annie E. Casey Foundation, a move the former Casey fellow said feels like going home. Donald spent more than three years as DHR secretary, focusing on decreasing the number of children living in group homes and finding work for people receiving welfare and child support payments. Donald will become the vice president of the Center for Effective Family Services and Systems, where she will formulate policies for disadvantaged children on a national level.
NEWS
March 18, 2010
T he death of 1-month-old Rajahnthon Haynie, whose body was recovered from Druid Hill Park on Sunday, presents yet another incident of child abuse that raises the inevitable question: Might this tragedy have been avoided? In a peculiar twist of fate, a law approved by the General Assembly just last year may make help prevent such horrors in the future - but it needs to be strengthened now. Lakesha Haynie, the infant boy's 28-year-old mother, has been charged with first-degree murder in his death.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | January 30, 2008
A month before Vernice Harris allegedly killed her daughter by giving her methadone and beating her, the mother asked a Baltimore Department of Social Services caseworker for help but was turned away. That's one of the findings of an investigative report released yesterday by the state Department of Human Resources, which oversees child protective services statewide. DHR Secretary Brenda Donald ordered the report in the wake of Vernice Harris' recent arrest on charges of first-degree murder in connection with the 2-year-old's death in June.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | January 30, 2008
A month before Vernice Harris allegedly killed her daughter by giving her methadone and beating her, the mother asked a Baltimore Department of Social Services caseworker for help but was turned away. That's one of the findings of an investigative report released yesterday by the state Department of Human Resources, which oversees child protective services statewide. DHR Secretary Brenda Donald ordered the report in the wake of Vernice Harris' recent arrest on charges of first-degree murder in connection with the 2-year-old's death in June.
NEWS
February 6, 1998
Highlights in Annapolis today:Senate convenes at 11 a.m., Senate chamber.House of Delegates meets, 11 a.m., House chamber.Senate Budget and Taxation Committee subcommittee hearing on Department of Human Resources budget, 1 p.m., Room 100, Senate office building.Pub Date: 2/06/98
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | January 31, 2006
The state Department of Human Resources' plan to deny Evershine Residential Services a license to care for troubled youths has been backed by an administrative law judge who said the firm had violated numerous state regulations. Judge William J.D. Somerville III in an opinion dated last Thursday, cited Evershine's failure to develop plans to care for each youth in its care, to make sure the staff lacked criminal records, to employ a full-time social worker and to report serious incidents, such as one child slashing a neighbor with a knife.
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