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BUSINESS
January 25, 2004
A weekly briefing on the economic calendar: Monday Notable earnings reports: American Standard, Dial Corp., Schering-Plough, American Express Tuesday The Conference Board releases its monthly survey of 5,000 households done to ascertain the level of consumer confidence. In December, a modest decline followed an upwardly revised 13.2 percent November gain. Earnings reports: Ingersoll-Rand, Lockheed Martin, Merck, Rockwell Automation Wednesday Department of Commerce releases durable goods orders, the dollar volume of orders, shipments, and unfilled orders of goods whose intended life span is three years or more.
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BUSINESS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
The National Aquarium in Washington will close this fall as a nearby building is renovated, and some of the 1,500 animals will be sent to Baltimore, aquarium officials said Thursday. In an email to aquarium members, John Racanelli, CEO of the National Aquarium, said the D.C. location will close Sept. 30 due to renovations on the Department of Commerce building. The aquarium is located on the building's lower level. The closure will not affect the National Aquarium in Baltimore , the email said, though it will have to accommodate some of the fish, reptiles, bird and amphibians from Washington.
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NEWS
April 13, 1996
RON BROWN would have enjoyed the irony of it all. His death on a war-recovery mission to Bosnia and Croatia last week effectively ends Republican efforts to abolish his Department of Commerce and scatter most of its functions to oblivion or other agencies. Actually, the House proposal, a part of Speaker Newt Gingrich's "Contract with America," was already making little headway in the Senate, where it encountered a reality check among senior Republicans.What some of the young Turks in the GOP forgot or never knew was that the Department of Commerce was a creation of two Republican presidents, Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft, and that it achieved its greatest influence in the 1920s under a secretary who became president, Republican Herbert Hoover.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2008
If you want to know how to develop great style without blowing your budget or your belief system, look no further than Jen Horning. The 34-year-old Frederick resident is a secretary at the U.S. Department of Commerce. As a single mom who's also been a vegetarian since she was a child, Horning has honed a style based on price and principles. On the job, she favors a slightly sexy professional look with lots of pencil skirts, jackets and blouses. On her off time, she favors a more "playful" look, like the outfit she was wearing to see Brazilian Girls perform at Sonar.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington from the archives of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | December 27, 1998
75 years agoUnder head coach Bob Folwell, the Midshipman squad resumed practice for the Tournament of Roses game against University of Washington in Pasadena on New Year's. -- The Sun, Dec. 8, 1923.Plans for a proposed extension of St. John's College, Annapolis, call for the old buildings to be retained and a quadrangle formed in the rear to be surrounded by six dormitories. -- The Sun, Dec. 15, 1923.The Bureau of the Census and the Department of Commerce made public figures showing that in 1922 the government of Maryland cost each Anne Arundel resident $12.06, compared to a cost of $7.93 in 1914.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1996
Stephen C. Kaminski, a Baltimore native and U.S. Department of Commerce employee, died Wednesday in the Balkan air crash that killed Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown and 33 others on a trade-building mission to Bosnia. Mr. Kaminski was 41.Mr. Kaminski was a counselor for commercial affairs assigned to the U.S. Embassy in Vienna, Austria, where his territory included the war-torn Balkan region."He was on the plane because he had the contacts," said his brother, Richard Kaminski of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 13, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Although Syria and Iran remain on the State Department list of nations that sponsor terrorism, the Bush administration has opened the way to sell sensitive American technology to the Middle Eastern countries, according to interviews and documents.The policy, adopted last fall after consultations between the Commerce and State departments, could send an array of material with both commercial and military applications -- so-called dual-use technology -- to the two countries, although a top administration export official contends that restrictions remain tight and basically unchanged.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | March 14, 1991
WASHINGTON -- He can't drum up enough business at home, so James R. Roane, a general contractor from Prince George's County, wants to try Kuwait.Roane showed up at the U.S. Department of Commerce yesterday to obtain a packet of information prepared for firms seeking contracts related to the rebuilding of Kuwait. Tens of thousands of business people have called, written or visited the department since it opened its information clearinghouse Monday."I have my own business and I'm just trying to find out what opportunities they have," Roane said.
NEWS
By Douglas Frantz and Ronald J. Ostrow and Douglas Frantz and Ronald J. Ostrow,Los Angeles Times | June 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- On its face, it seems to be a criminal act.In preparing a document to be submitted to Congress in late 1990 listing all U.S. technology exports to Iraq, someone at the Department of Commerce removed a critical phrase identifying the military nature of a facility north of Baghdad where the exports were headed, according to internal department records.The original, classified record of the export license -- for sensitive U.S. electronics equipment -- said, "According to our information, the end-user is involved in military matters."
NEWS
By Sara Fritz and Sara Fritz,Los Angeles Times | June 4, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Kuwaiti government paid more than $66,000 to fly Secretary of Commerce Robert A. Mosbacher Sr., his wife and aides to Kuwait City in early March to view the destruction of that country in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf war, according to reports made public yesterday.The trip to Kuwait was just one of more than 30 trips -- both foreign and domestic -- that Mr. Mosbacher has taken over the past 2 1/2 years at the expense of foreign governments or U.S. corporations.Although President Bush persuaded Congress two years ago to permit all top administration officials to travel at the expense of private corporations, Mr. Mosbacher, a multimillionaire, far exceeds any other Cabinet officer in using this privilege.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Senate voted yesterday to tighten federal oversight of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration after a report in The Sun raised questions about spending on a program to restore oysters to the Chesapeake Bay. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, the Maryland Democrat who has placed the earmark that funds the Oyster Recovery Partnership in the federal budget in each of the past several years, was among those who voted for greater oversight....
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | October 20, 2005
Maurice Albert Peter, a former aeronautical engineer who later worked for the U.S. Department of Commerce, died of heart failure Sunday at St. Agnes HealthCare. The longtime Academy Heights resident was 83. Mr. Peter was born and raised in Washington, and graduated from Gonzaga College High School. After earning his bachelor's degree in 1944 from Catholic University of America, he enlisted in the Navy, where he served in the Pacific as a flight engineer. Returning to Baltimore after the war, he went to work as an aeronautical engineer at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2004
A weekly briefing on the economic calendar: Monday Earnings: Concord EFS, Navistar, Chesapeake Energy. Tuesday The Conference Board releases its February survey of 5,000 households to determine the level of consumer confidence. Last month, consumer confidence stood at 96.8, an increase of 5.1 from December. Earnings reports: Deere, H.J. Heinz, H&R Block, Patina Oil & Gas, Weight Watchers. Wednesday National Association of Realtors reports existing-home sales for January. The December report showed an increase of 6.9 percent.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2003
The National Aquarium in Baltimore will sign an agreement today that will give it operating control of the National Aquarium in Washington - the first step in a plan to command a larger role nationally and around the world. The Baltimore aquarium intends to spotlight its managerial capabilities at the Washington aquarium, located just off the National Mall, with a goal of making itself the nation's foremost training ground for aquarium curators and scientific staff. It also plans to build on its reputation as one of the nation's finest aquariums by increasing its institutional emphasis on research and education at an added building close to the Baltimore aquarium.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | February 21, 1999
THERE IS BIG TROUBLE BREWING in Washington. And I am not talking that mess involving Monica Lewinsky and President You Know Who. Nobody cares about that anymore. The public is sick of it. The Republicans could produce a videotape of the president and Monica pistol-whipping a 7-Eleven clerk and then performing an illegal act with a Slim Jim, and the public would say, "So what! Let's focus on the issues!"No, the trouble I'm talking about is the federal budget surplus. It is raging out of control.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington from the archives of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | December 27, 1998
75 years agoUnder head coach Bob Folwell, the Midshipman squad resumed practice for the Tournament of Roses game against University of Washington in Pasadena on New Year's. -- The Sun, Dec. 8, 1923.Plans for a proposed extension of St. John's College, Annapolis, call for the old buildings to be retained and a quadrangle formed in the rear to be surrounded by six dormitories. -- The Sun, Dec. 15, 1923.The Bureau of the Census and the Department of Commerce made public figures showing that in 1922 the government of Maryland cost each Anne Arundel resident $12.06, compared to a cost of $7.93 in 1914.
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