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NEWS
January 8, 2003
In explaining his opposition to a proposed increase in Howard County's real estate transfer tax, real estate broker Louis M. Pope named a reason that was misleading in a Tuesday article in the Howard County edition of The Sun. Residents who refinance the home in which they live are not subject to transfer taxes, according to Robert E. Young, associate director of Maryland's Department of Assessments and Taxation.
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NEWS
January 3, 2009
Still time to stop expensive highway With an intelligent push for light rail, bus rapid transit and carpooling under way, there are few good reasons remaining to build the polluting dinosaur of a project known as the Intercounty Connector ("Budget blues," editorial, Dec. 21). The interest payments on the project alone will cost the state hundreds of millions of dollars, not just now but well into our future. How can we build a road that costs $180 million a mile without funding simple, much less expensive alternatives that could eliminate the need for the ICC?
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BUSINESS
April 18, 1999
Access to real property assessment records, tax maps and sales data from the State Department of Assessments and Taxation can now be obtained on the Internet at www.dat.state.md.us seven days a week, 24 hours a day.The site was originally posted last April and was updated in the fall. It offers access to any of the 2 million real property accounts in Maryland.All that is needed to access the information is the address, the account number or the map parcel on the tax map."We noticed a large demand by people wanting to access property records, so we built this site to make it more convenient than having to call or visit local assessment offices," said Ronald W. Wineholt, director of Maryland's Department of Assessments and Taxation.
BUSINESS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS | January 4, 2008
If you have a house, you have a property tax bill. The state Department of Assessments and Taxation sent the 728,185 letters out last Friday covering a third of Maryland properties. If you got one, you might be wondering why your new assessment doesn't reflect the fact that prices are generally stagnant. That's because your last assessment was three years ago. Individual cases will vary, but average area sales prices are up 20 percent since November 2004. Still, take a close look at your home's reported value.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2001
Feb. 12 is deadline to mail appeals of assessments Homeowners who recently received a property assessment notice from the state Department of Assessments and Taxation and wish to dispute the department's estimate must postmark their appeal form by Feb. 12. About 620,000 assessment notices were mailed Dec. 29. The Feb. 12 deadline to file an appeal is for those property owners who received notices, said Ron W. Wineholt, director of the state Department of...
NEWS
February 4, 2003
Mildred C. Kennedy, a retired administrative assistant with the state Department of Assessments and Taxation, died of cancer Thursday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Timonium resident was 79. Born and raised in Baltimore, Miss Kennedy was the daughter of Ambrose Kennedy, an insurance executive who was a congressman from 1932 to 1940. She attended the Institute of Notre Dame and graduated from Mount St. Agnes High School in 1942. After graduating from Eaton & Burnett Business College Inc., she worked as a secretary for the Veterans Administration.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Edward Gunts and Sheridan Lyons and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1996
William Kenneth Blevins, former deputy director of the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation, died Thursday at Sinai Hospital of a heart attack after surgery. He was 68.A top-ranking official with the state for 16 years, he helped to unify the way state property taxes were assessed throughout Maryland. He began his career as an assessor in Baltimore County in 1963.Ronald W. Wineholt, director of the Department of Assessments and Taxation, said Mr. Blevins filled the No. 2 slot for many years before the deputy's position was created officially.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1997
DENTON -- "Caroline County came in first, unfortunately," sighed Margaret Myers, president of the three-member County Commission during yesterday's meeting.The "first" -- Caroline County's property assessments increased more than any other in the state last year -- has angered a lot of property owners and stirred up a small furor in this rural mid-Shore county, known for its rich soil and productive vegetable farms.Citizen complaints and letters of appeal led the County Commission yesterday to invite the local assessor and the director of the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation to a future meeting and explain how assessments are made.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2003
Owners of real property damaged by last month's Tropical Storm Isabel could be eligible for property tax abatement and refunds. To qualify for property tax relief, all or part of the property must be destroyed or rendered uninhabitable for a substantial period of time. Examples are a destroyed deck or outbuilding that is not repaired or replaced; a finished basement made unusable by flooding; or an entire house that has been structurally damaged by the storm. Where the value of all or part of real property is destroyed by a hurricane, fire or other casualty, the property owner is entitled to ask for the tax assessment to be reduced.
NEWS
By DAVID ELLSWORTH BOYD | January 29, 1991
Property tax protest! It's on the minds of many people, some ofwhom may never have thought about it until various groups formed in Baltimore County.My group, Property Taxpayers United, started in January 1990 when central Baltimore County property owners were reassessed. Now new groups and extensions of our group are organizing in Dundalk, Essex, Perry Hall, Parkville and elsewhere. These are the homeowners from the Eastern part of the county who recently received their new assessments and tax bills.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | September 5, 2007
Thousands of property owners might be getting improper tax breaks on second homes and rental properties, and more than 1,100 out-of-state companies might be doing business in Maryland without registering or paying required fees, according to a legislative audit released yesterday. The state is instituting a new application procedure to ensure that Maryland residential property owners get homestead credits - which limit annual property tax increases - only on their principal residences, as the law requires.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2005
State legislators are pushing for increased property tax relief for low-income homeowners - especially seniors - being buffeted by Maryland's rapidly rising home values. The state Homeowners' Tax Credit Program, designed to aid a relatively small but vulnerable percentage of the population, is assisting fewer and fewer people because it is calculated in a way that penalizes residents of houses that are appreciating steeply. A bill that passed in the House two weeks ago and is before the Senate could help several thousand people at a cost of about $1.5 million next fiscal year.
BUSINESS
By Scott Waldman and Scott Waldman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 2005
Homeowners are usually happy to find the value of their property is increasing - especially when they are looking to sell or tap its equity. But soaring home prices also bring higher tax bills, as 692,000 homeowners found out early this month when assessment notices landed in their mailboxes. The assessments, on which tax bills are based, marked the largest increases in values since 1980, when the state adopted a three-year cycle for assessing properties. Assessments for residential properties rose an average of 52.2 percent from when they were revalued three years ago. With home prices in many areas regularly posting double-digit increases over the corresponding month a year earlier, the increases were hardly a surprise, state officials said.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2004
While the highest assessments in more than a decade are arriving in the mail to one-third of Harford's property owners, the county isn't preparing for a major boost to its coffers. "It helps the county grow revenues to cover inflation," said budget director John J. O'Neill Jr. "It's not a big windfall for the county. It doesn't give us a big pot of money." The state Department of Assessments and Taxation, which reassesses one-third of the properties in each of the state's 24 jurisdictions each year, mailed out new assessments last week to more than 645,000 properties, 22,500 of which are in Harford, said Jerrald Simmers of the state Department of Assessments and Taxation.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2003
Owners of real property damaged by last month's Tropical Storm Isabel could be eligible for property tax abatement and refunds. To qualify for property tax relief, all or part of the property must be destroyed or rendered uninhabitable for a substantial period of time. Examples are a destroyed deck or outbuilding that is not repaired or replaced; a finished basement made unusable by flooding; or an entire house that has been structurally damaged by the storm. Where the value of all or part of real property is destroyed by a hurricane, fire or other casualty, the property owner is entitled to ask for the tax assessment to be reduced.
NEWS
February 4, 2003
Mildred C. Kennedy, a retired administrative assistant with the state Department of Assessments and Taxation, died of cancer Thursday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Timonium resident was 79. Born and raised in Baltimore, Miss Kennedy was the daughter of Ambrose Kennedy, an insurance executive who was a congressman from 1932 to 1940. She attended the Institute of Notre Dame and graduated from Mount St. Agnes High School in 1942. After graduating from Eaton & Burnett Business College Inc., she worked as a secretary for the Veterans Administration.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2004
While the highest assessments in more than a decade are arriving in the mail to one-third of Harford's property owners, the county isn't preparing for a major boost to its coffers. "It helps the county grow revenues to cover inflation," said budget director John J. O'Neill Jr. "It's not a big windfall for the county. It doesn't give us a big pot of money." The state Department of Assessments and Taxation, which reassesses one-third of the properties in each of the state's 24 jurisdictions each year, mailed out new assessments last week to more than 645,000 properties, 22,500 of which are in Harford, said Jerrald Simmers of the state Department of Assessments and Taxation.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2005
State legislators are pushing for increased property tax relief for low-income homeowners - especially seniors - being buffeted by Maryland's rapidly rising home values. The state Homeowners' Tax Credit Program, designed to aid a relatively small but vulnerable percentage of the population, is assisting fewer and fewer people because it is calculated in a way that penalizes residents of houses that are appreciating steeply. A bill that passed in the House two weeks ago and is before the Senate could help several thousand people at a cost of about $1.5 million next fiscal year.
NEWS
January 8, 2003
In explaining his opposition to a proposed increase in Howard County's real estate transfer tax, real estate broker Louis M. Pope named a reason that was misleading in a Tuesday article in the Howard County edition of The Sun. Residents who refinance the home in which they live are not subject to transfer taxes, according to Robert E. Young, associate director of Maryland's Department of Assessments and Taxation.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2001
Feb. 12 is deadline to mail appeals of assessments Homeowners who recently received a property assessment notice from the state Department of Assessments and Taxation and wish to dispute the department's estimate must postmark their appeal form by Feb. 12. About 620,000 assessment notices were mailed Dec. 29. The Feb. 12 deadline to file an appeal is for those property owners who received notices, said Ron W. Wineholt, director of the state Department of...
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