Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDepartment Of Agriculture
IN THE NEWS

Department Of Agriculture

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,Special to the Sun | March 19, 1998
It was former Gov. William Donald Schaefer who commanded staffers at the Maryland Department of Agriculture to talk to the animals.Well, that's not exactly how Schaefer said it - though it's easy to imagine the colorful and oft-quoted politico making such a demand. After all, this is the man who as mayor of Baltimore got some of his best press frolicking with some frisky seals at the city's National Aquarium.Shortly after he was elected governor, Schaefer urged all state agencies to open their offices to the public at least once a year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Richard W. Ganoczy, a retired draftsman and Coast Guard veteran, died Jan 21 of cancer at Homestead of Sun Valley, a Sykesville assisted-living facility. He was 73. Mr. Ganoczy was born and raised in New York City, where he graduated from public schools. After serving in the Coast Guard from 1958 to 1964, Mr. Ganoczy moved to Washington, where he worked as a graphic artist for WTOP-TV. During the 1960s, he attended District of Columbia Teachers College. He later studied at the University of Florida in Gainesville and earned a bachelor's degree from Frostburg State University.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2003
When Judy Harlan's husband, Bill, walked up the hill to their Harford County farmhouse in late May and told her she had to come see something by the Little Gunpowder Falls, she knew it would be unusual -- but an alienlike plant, growing fast, with leaves the size of tabletops? "I was just amazed at the size of the leaves," Judy Harlan said. "It looked like a giant Queen Anne's lace." What they had found next door to their farmland was giant hogweed, a cousin to the carrot and an invasive species worthy of a most-wanted list for noxious plants.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 24, 2012
The Chesapeake Bay region's fledgling pollution "trading" programs are getting an infusion of federal funds aimed at encouraging farmers to participate. The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Friday that it's awarding five grants totaling $2.6 $2.35 million to boost pollution trading efforts in Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia. They're part of $26 million in "conservation innovation" grants being handed out nationwide, including funds to support other water-quality trading along the Ohio River and in Oregon.
NEWS
By U.S. Department of Agriculture | August 31, 2003
Americans consume 21.7 gallons of beer -- or nearly 39 six-packs -- a year. -- U.S. Department of Agriculture
FEATURES
May 8, 1991
For food safety questions call the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Meat and Poultry Hotline, 1-800-535-4555, between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
NEWS
August 6, 2006
Dr. Olga Julia Catter, an athlete and a bilingual specialist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, died of cancer July 30 at her Columbia home. She was 65. Born in Talara, Peru, she was a well-known track and field and volleyball athlete who represented Peru in competitions throughout South America and Europe, including the 1962 Iberian-American games. She earned a medical degree at the Universidad de San Marcos but did not practice. She moved to Michigan in 1971 and eight years later relocated to Fallston before settling in Columbia.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 26, 2003
Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens tapped her land-use and environment officer as her next top aide yesterday. Robert L. Walker, 54, a former diplomat and state Secretary of Agriculture, will take over as Owens' chief administrative officer. He replaces John Brusnighan, who retired last month. Before going to work in county government in 2001, Walker held diplomatic assignments in Ukraine and Russia for the U.S. Department of Agriculture. From 1986 to 1994, he worked for the Maryland Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
October 18, 2000
Spraying for the West Nile virus will take place tonight in the Turf Valley and Dorsey sections of Howard County, according to the state Department of Agriculture. Officials said spraying will begin at 7 p.m. in the communities of Turf Valley Overlook, College Farm, the Clusers, Washington Manor Park, Lennox Park, the Dorsey Business Center and Meadow Ridge Memorial Park cemetery. Information: 410-841-5870.
NEWS
By Elizabeth A. Shack and Elizabeth A. Shack,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | July 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - It's poised at Maryland's borders, 15 feet tall with sap that causes skin to blister and burn in sunlight. Giant hogweed, whose scientific name is Heracleum mantegazzianum, has been found in Pennsylvania and the District of Columbia, and officials fear it could migrate into Maryland and become a public health hazard. It is related to carrots and parsley, but the white-flowered hogweed can grow up to 20 feet high with 5-foot-wide leaves. While carrot and parsley leaves can cause rashes in people sensitive to them, the sap of the giant hogweed makes skin more sensitive to ultraviolet radiation and causes severe burns and blisters, said Alan Tasker, coordinator of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Federal Noxious Weed Program.
NEWS
By Ruth Berlin and Andrew Fellows | November 28, 2010
It is long past time for Maryland to regulate pesticides in a manner that properly protects people and the environment. This is unlikely under the current watchdog, the Maryland Department of Agriculture (MDA), whose actions tend to reflect the interests of the Farm Bureau and chemical-based pest control and lawncare industries. That is why Gov. Martin O'Malley should transfer authority over pesticides from the MDA to the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE), whose staff includes medical and science professionals far better equipped to develop objective, science-based environmental and public health regulatory policy.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2009
SALARY: $46,000 AGE: 29 TIME ON THE JOB: 6 months How she got started: : Amy Crone graduated from Cornell University with a degree in government and Latin-American relations. She went on to earn a graduate degree from American University in international development. Most recently she worked as a research and policy analyst for the Center for Global Development, a nonprofit think tank in Washington. She researched ways to administer foreign assistance to developing nations. During her off hours, she managed the FRESHFARM Market in Annapolis.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,bill.ordine@baltsun.com | November 27, 2008
The equine herpesvirus scare at Laurel Park appears to be over. The Maryland Department of Agriculture announced yesterday that "all 25 horses in Laurel Park's Barn 1 have tested negative for the neurologic form of equine herpesvirus [EHV-1] on a second round of tests." The results conclude a situation that began two weeks ago, when a 2-year-old filly showed signs of the condition Nov. 12 and tests confirmed she had the disease. The filly was euthanized Nov. 15. Yesterday's announcement of the favorable test results was accompanied by the lifting of all restrictions on horse movement at Laurel Park.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | October 5, 2008
Based on preliminary information from pest management officials with the state Department of Agriculture, the shade trees in your yard are less likely to fall victim to voracious caterpillars next year than in the recent past. The state reports that a naturally occurring fungus caused by wet spring weather, along with the Agriculture Department's effective suppression program, has resulted in a decline in gypsy moth defoliation this fall as compared with last year. State officials also expect less of an attack by the leaf-eating caterpillars next year.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | September 14, 2008
The Maryland Department of Agriculture has confirmed the spread of a voracious ash tree-killing beetle to a wooded region of northern Charles County. Previously, the pest, commonly called the emerald ash borer, had been limited to a site south of Andrews Air Force Base in Prince George's County. In recent years, the beetle has been blamed for the destruction of 25 million ash trees, including about 25,000 in Maryland. The latest detection is in a wooded area of Charles County just over the border from Prince George's.
NEWS
August 28, 2008
Aquaculture boosts the state's economy I appreciate The Baltimore Sun's support for aquaculture and recognition of the important role that the shellfish industry plays in improving water quality in our treasured Chesapeake Bay ("Moneymaking on the half-shell," editorial, Aug. 24). Maryland's shellfish aquaculture industry employs several dozen people and generates approximately $3 million for our economy. Under Gov. Martin O'Malley's leadership, the Maryland Department of Agriculture is working to implement aquaculture enterprise zones, which will help streamline the permit process for aquaculture projects in the Chesapeake Bay and coastal bays, provide incentives to catalyze private investment in leasing operations and encourage commercial fishery experts to transition to aquaculture.
NEWS
November 2, 1995
The U.S. Department of Agriculture has sued the former operator of a Baltimore food market, claiming he "unjustly enriched" himself in a food-stamp fraud scheme that netted him more than $400,000.Travis Parnell Wallace ran the Travis and Sons Food Market until August 1994.The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, seeks to recover all or part of the money as well as an injunction to prohibit Mr. Wallace from participating in the program.
NEWS
May 20, 2003
Maryland farmers rank 10th in the nation with a net income of about $33,000 per operation. The national average is $21,382, and West Virginia ranks last at $2,023. Data are from 2000. State........Net farm income .................. per operation........Rank Arizona.....$82,218.................1 Florida.....61,658.................2 California.....61,131.................3 North Carolina.....54,520.................4 Delaware.....52,273.................5 Connecticut.....47,380 .....
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.