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NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2000
"BARBERSHOP singing is like ice skating," says Nancy Harring, manager of the women's barbershop chorus Chesapeake Harmony. "You have to learn to do a single jump before you can try a double or a triple." That's why members of the 2-year-old organization - the subject of this column in March - are so excited about their ranking in the annual barbershop competition at Ocean City Convention Center. Chesapeake Harmony finished in 12th place among 21 choruses from Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware and New Jersey.
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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2000
Tennis lessons start at 7 a.m., stained-glass making and fitness walking at 9, followed by chess and line dancing. After lunch there's bowling, opera, advanced computers and tap dancing. This is not a Club Med or a cruise ship. It's the daily activities schedule at Catonsville Senior Center, one of 18 centers run by Baltimore County Department of Aging. When they began opening more than 30 years ago, senior centers were often places where elderly women would sit and knit and men would play pool.
NEWS
By Kimberly Marselas and Kimberly Marselas,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 30, 2000
Among her many volunteer causes, Betty O'Leary's most challenging has been a 16-year-old girl. The two met through a mentoring program operated by the county Department of Aging -- linking adults with children identified by their often-troubled lives as at risk for substance abuse and other problems. "I have put in millions of hours," O'Leary said, only half-jokingly, of the relationship forged through the program. "I guess I just feel very close with her." She has accompanied the Pasadena teen-ager as a mentor through countless hearings and meetings during 13 months -- a troubled period in which the girl was moved from an abusive home into two foster-care settings.
NEWS
April 23, 2000
Senior events The Joseph Center: Computer classes are now being offered in word processing, printing and Internet as well. At 430 S. Broadway. Call 410-732-5000. Overlea Fullerton Senior Center: At 2 p.m. Thursdays: Line dance classes. $1 a class. At 4314 Fullerton Ave. Call 410-887-5220. Pikesville Senior Center: Bicycle rides are offered for seniors on Mondays and Tuesdays throughout the Maryland/ Delaware region, starting at various locations. Call 410-887-1245. Countyride available: Baltimore County Department of Aging's transportation service is available to seniors in need of rides.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER and MICHAEL OLESKER,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2000
THE WORLD moves too quickly now. We dance to the speed of the computer, sloughing off yesterday and turning yesteryear into a blur. We forget what we've lost. Into the void steps the Baltimore County Department of Aging, and 98 citizens with pen (and keyboard) in hand. They remember. They've written essays for the department's creative writing contest that stop time and melt the heart. Their common theme is Significant Memories of the 20th Century. Start with this one, from Carol Knepshield of Dundalk, of an ordinary summer day in 1945 that was "made sacred."
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2000
People shop around for a car and a house. Why not do the same for their funeral? That's what advocates for the elderly at Baltimore County's Department of Aging were thinking when they began putting together a consumer guide to planning a burial or cremation. The 36-page booklet, with advice on how to choose a casket or donate your body to science, was released this week. Because the subject often makes people squeamish, the authors gave the guide the oblique title, "It May Be Your Third Largest Purchase."
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2000
Long before dawn, Pamela Perkins prepares her 88-year-old mother for a day alone in their Rosedale home. She washes and changes the sheets on her mother's hospital bed, sets out her five medicines and makes sure the remote control and portable phone are close to her wheelchair. By 6: 45 a.m., Perkins heads to the first of her two jobs. Later in the morning, her mother, Mildred Clarke, will receive a Meals on Wheels lunch, followed by a visit from another daughter. Their lives are complicated, tiring and an act of mutual love.
NEWS
By ISAAC REHERT and ISAAC REHERT,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 13, 2000
Nearly everyone today has now lived in two centuries. But a small number -- a very small number -- has lived in three. People living today who were born on and before Dec. 31, 1899 can claim not just the 21st but the 20th and 19th centuries as their own. The State Department of Aging estimates that between 500 and 750 of the five million residents of Maryland are in this group. They might be called the Three Centuries Club. Pamela Causey of the State Department of Aging says: "With the advances in medical science, more and more people are living longer and the number who reach 100 will only go up. ... People need to be shown that growing older doesn't necessarily mean that life is no longer interesting or joyful."
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 8, 1999
THE ANNAPOLIS Senior Center opens officially tomorrow with the sort of hubbub appropriate to the occasion. Even before the speechifying begins, there are signs that it is going to be a tremendously popular place.In line with national trends, the number of people ages 55 and older in Anne Arundel is expected to approach 30 percent of the population by the year 2020, according to the county's Department of Aging. South County Senior Center in Edgewater, not a decade old, is jammed with some 2,000 regular participants, said Shirley Miller, the assistant director.
NEWS
November 3, 1999
Annapolis Mayor Dean L. Johnson and County Executive Janet S. Owens are among the invited guests expected to take part in the opening of a new home for the Annapolis Senior Center from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday.The center has spent a week moving from the Glenwood seniors high-rise on Glenwood Street to the Eastport Shopping Center at 1027 Bay Ridge Ave. That site is expected to be an interim home, with the senior center expected to move again in a few years to the old Bates High School after it undergoes renovation.
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