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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 18, 1992
He's a hunka hunka burning charm, is Denzel Washington, blowing that old-fashioned movie star charisma out full bore, such intensity you think he's maybe going to melt the windows.Washington, in black Levis, a black turtleneck and white Reeboks, thunders into a hotel room and throws himself down to beat the press. And beat us he does. All that energy translates instantaneously into admiration. Where interviews with Spike Lee have a tendency to break up into testy staring matches, Denzel Washington's turn into religious ceremonies: Oh, come let us adore him.Sporting a mustache for his current role in a Jonathan Demme film being shot in Philadelphia, Washington, even late in a day full of interviews, still beams with energy and positive good feelings.
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By Aaron Wilson | July 25, 2013
Outside linebacker Courtney Upshaw dropped roughly 20 pounds over the summer after tipping the scales at 295 pounds in June. Upshaw attributed that weight gain to missing workouts while dealing with personal issues in his home state of Alabama. Although he still has more weight to drop to get into optimal condition, Upshaw moved around more fluidly and seemed to have better stamina after appearing sluggish during a June minicamp. “I feel great. I'm still working to get down some more pounds,” Upshaw said.
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 28, 2003
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- Denzel Washington needed Emeryville. It's a small city tucked between Berkeley and Oakland on San Francisco Bay, but in a defining moment, it was the center of the earth. Emeryville was where Washington screened his directorial debut, Antwone Fisher, for the first time. He sneaked into the theater with a baseball cap pulled low over his face after the lights went down. And he waited. Washington has won adulation in front of the camera. Two Academy Awards, including a best-actor turn for Training Day, have made him one of the most bankable stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dustin Levy | June 11, 2013
Known for his spot-on impressions of President Obama, Eddie Murphy, Denzel Washington and many others, cast member Jay Pharoah prepares for his first stand-up performance in Baltimore at the Baltimore Comedy Factory from Friday through Sunday. We spoke with Pharoah about discovering his knack for impressions, meeting Obama and previewing the next season of "SNL. " What are you looking forward to about performing here? Any time I can get on the stage and just show the world, that's the way to do it. I'm just excited about people coming out. I'm excited about another market seeing the talent.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 12, 1996
Edward Zwick's "Courage Under Fire" has the taste of old wine in new bottles, except that the product in the shiny container is a virtue, not a beverage.That virtue is courage and the movie can be seen, among its other meanings, as a celebration of the traditionally male thing of battlefield guts as it passes to the other gender -- in the form of a tough-as-nails chopper pilot played by Meg Ryan. During the Persian Gulf War, Ryan takes out an Iraqi tank, sets up a perimeter defense, shoots, kills, spits and curses like Sgt. Rock on a good day.Or does she?
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 5, 2001
Denzel Washington does a cocksure turn in Training Day as a crooked undercover narcotics cop instructing an idealistic new partner, Ethan Hawke, in the ways of the street. That may be enough to transform a shallow picture with delusions of grandeur into a crowd-pleasing hit. American actors rarely get a chance to sound every key in their register. This whole movie is built on Washington's seizing that opportunity while he criss-crosses Los Angeles in a souped-up, lowriding 1978 Monte Carlo.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 25, 2002
Two and a half hours into the 74th annual Academy Awards, the extravaganza reached an emotional highpoint when veteran actor Sidney Poitier took the stage to accept his honorary Oscar and the entire Academy took to its feet. But it would be just one golden moment in a historic night that welcomed the Oscars into their new home and saw some old ghosts laid emphatically to rest, with Halle Berry and Denzel Washington joining Poitier as the only African-Americans ever to win best acting Oscars.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 22, 2006
Deja Vu is a misnomer. This elaborate, action-packed thriller centers on a cutting-edge FBI surveillance unit that enlists ATF agent Denzel Washington to solve the bombing of a jammed New Orleans ferry. The film is tense and engrossing. But it lacks exactly what the title advertises: the sense of inexplicable familiarity that should haunt you as the story unfolds and leave you all a-tingle when it ends. Deja vu (Touchstone) Starring Denzel Washington, Paula Patton, Jim Caviezel, Val Kilmer, Adam Goldberg.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 2, 2007
American Gangster, the story of real-life 1960s Harlem super-criminal Frank Lucas (Denzel Washington), wants to be The Godfather, Serpico and that blaxploitation cult classic, Across 110th Street, wrapped into one Superfly chinchilla coat. It plays like a deluxe network-TV miniseries edited to be seen in a single sitting, but with all the nudity, profanity and gore the networks would cut out. The human drama takes a back seat to rise-and-fall criminal milestones that occur every 15 minutes.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | December 25, 2007
An optimistic movie set during the Great Depression, the fact-based The Great Debaters coarsens its inspirational story and powerful history with movie devices that date to the 1930s. Director Denzel Washington uses the cliffhanging climaxes and heartwarming turnarounds that made audiences 70 years ago want to stand up and cheer. But he also inserts the explosive racial material that Old Hollywood ignored - and social volatility doesn't naturally fit into these rah-rah forms. In the cliche-ridden script by Robert Eisele, the superb debate squad from all-black Wiley College in East Texas witnesses every indignity and injustice of the Jim Crow South in the course of one year (1935)
SPORTS
Sports Digest | September 20, 2012
College soccer Navy men knock off No. 20 George Mason, 2-1 in 2 OTs Dave Arnold (Mount St. Joseph) scored his first goal of the season in the 108th minute Wednesday night to give the visiting Navy men's soccer team a 2-1 double-overtime victory over No. 20 George Mason (6-1-0). The win was the first for Navy (3-2-1) over a ranked foe since beating 20th-ranked West Virginia, 1-0, on Oct. 16, 2007. "This was a super win for us, and I felt we deserved it. We had a couple of tough breaks tonight, but the team stayed tight and focused and made some plays when we needed it," Navy coach Dave Brandt said.
NEWS
February 9, 2009
Series American Experience: : "The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln" focuses on the months after his death, when a nation mourned and authorities sought his killer. Will Patton reads the words of John Wilkes Booth. (9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22/67) The Girls of Hedsor Hall: : Young women try to become ladies at a proper English finishing school in this new, unscripted series. (9 p.m., MTV) Medium: : Allison (Patricia Arquette) dreams of murders witnessed by someone who's already dead. (10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | June 2, 2008
Sherrie Westin's smash-hit Sesame Workshop annual bash at Cipriani 42 Street gets our vote as the benefit that most benefits its generous donors. The evening, with Anderson Cooper and the Muppets hosting, let people go home at 9:30 p.m. My date whispered to me that he had seen there "every important person I've ever known in New York!" The evening was inspiring, with an emphasis on how Sesame Street helps millions of children in India to better preschool education. Since one out of every six kids in the world lives in India; this is really something!
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 14, 2008
Get ready! American Idol superstar Clay Aiken joins the Tony award-winning musical Monty Python's Spamalot, causing a line at the doors of the Shubert Theatre on West 44th Street beginning Friday. And he'll stick with this hilarious show through May 4. Director Mike Nichols: "Clay is amazing, beyond that glorious voice. Turns out he is an excellent comic actor and a master of character. People are going to be surprised by his wide-ranging talent, since the first impression is of great country charm and a singer to remember.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 28, 2007
Few big-studio movies that are lavishly promoted and favorably reviewed arrive dead on arrival at the box office. But Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story, Judd Apatow and Jake Kasdan's volcanically funny spoof of musical biopics like Coal Miner's Daughter failed to attract audiences from its first showings a week ago. Could it be that audiences just don't want to see wiseacre moviemakers lampoon Very Important Movies? From that delicious parody of airborne disaster pictures, Airplane!, to the abysmal Scary Movie spoofs of horror films, audiences have lined up to see stupid plot conventions shot down.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | December 25, 2007
An optimistic movie set during the Great Depression, the fact-based The Great Debaters coarsens its inspirational story and powerful history with movie devices that date to the 1930s. Director Denzel Washington uses the cliffhanging climaxes and heartwarming turnarounds that made audiences 70 years ago want to stand up and cheer. But he also inserts the explosive racial material that Old Hollywood ignored - and social volatility doesn't naturally fit into these rah-rah forms. In the cliche-ridden script by Robert Eisele, the superb debate squad from all-black Wiley College in East Texas witnesses every indignity and injustice of the Jim Crow South in the course of one year (1935)
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 24, 2006
Spike Lee grafts his unique sensibilities onto a pretty conventional bank heist plot with Inside Man. The results are mixed; some of Lee's cinematic tricks seem simply out of place. But look past the occasional slip, and what emerges is a slick, briskly paced tale of bank robbers who think they're at least half-again as smart as everybody else, and maybe are. Lee, working off a screenplay from first-timer Russell Gewirtz, certainly benefits from his continued good standing within Hollywood's acting community.
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By Janet Maslin and Janet Maslin,New York Times News Service | October 7, 1991
In the mean, flashy revenge thriller "Richochet," which opened Friday at neighborhood theaters, Denzel Washington plays Nick Styles, a police officer who makes an arrest during an amusement-park shootout.This event is memorable because it leads to the incarceration of the crazed Earl Talbot Blake (John Lithgow), because it greatly advances Nick's career and because Nick contrives to do it while stripped down to his skivvies.The film, while supposedly concentrating on the war of nerves between Nick and Earl, also concocts as many excuses as possible for Mr. Washington to show off his fine physique.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 2, 2007
American Gangster, the story of real-life 1960s Harlem super-criminal Frank Lucas (Denzel Washington), wants to be The Godfather, Serpico and that blaxploitation cult classic, Across 110th Street, wrapped into one Superfly chinchilla coat. It plays like a deluxe network-TV miniseries edited to be seen in a single sitting, but with all the nudity, profanity and gore the networks would cut out. The human drama takes a back seat to rise-and-fall criminal milestones that occur every 15 minutes.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Reporter | April 22, 2007
ACT I, SCENE I And for dessert ... Broadway THE LION KING / / Minskoff Theatre, 200 W. 45th St., New York / / 800-334-8457 or disneybroadway.com ONLINE: To view a video of Julian Ivey of "The Lion King," go to baltimoresun.com / simba Julian Ivey Born: Aug. 3, 1995 in Cheverly Resides: temporarily in New York City Siblings: Alex, 17; David, 14; Troy, 9; Aaron, 7. First unpaid acting role: A "sleepyhead" in a local production of The Wizard of Oz What he brought to New York: photos of friends and a necklace his mother bought for him on a business trip to El Salvador "Special abilities" listed on acting resume: soccer, horseback riding, gymnastics, infectious laughter, great whistler Favorite actor: Denzel Washington What he misses most about being away from home?
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