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Denyce Graves

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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
In terms of talent, glamour and wide appeal, few opera singers today rank as high as mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves. No wonder there's quite a buzz at the Peabody Conservatory, where Graves will join the voice faculty in the fall. People are still talking about a master class that Graves gave at the conservatory last September. "She didn't know she was auditioning," said Phyllis Bryn-Julson, the distinguished soprano who chairs the voice department. "It was a phenomenal day for the students.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
In terms of talent, glamour and wide appeal, few opera singers today rank as high as mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves. No wonder there's quite a buzz at the Peabody Conservatory, where Graves will join the voice faculty in the fall. People are still talking about a master class that Graves gave at the conservatory last September. "She didn't know she was auditioning," said Phyllis Bryn-Julson, the distinguished soprano who chairs the voice department. "It was a phenomenal day for the students.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By tim smith and tim smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 13, 2008
When it was new, Bizet's Carmen generated little enthusiasm among the operatic intelligentsia. Typical of the reaction was this from The New York Times, after the opera's first U.S. performance in 1878: "As a work of art, it is naught." Even its tunefulness was called into question: "Of melody, as the term is generally understood, there is but little" said the Boston Gazette. Makes you wonder what kind of meds those guys were on. Needless to say, no amount of carping could ever stop Carmen from becoming one of the world's most popular operas.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2010
The opera singer who eventually became Dr. Robert A. Montgomery's wife would never have taken him for a kidney transplant surgeon the first time she saw him, not with the long hair and that outrageous mustache. Maybe a biker, she figured, and maybe she was onto something there. When he heads for work at Johns Hopkins Hospital from his loft in Fells Point or the manse he shares in Bethesda with Denyce Graves, the internationally known mezzo soprano, Montgomery roars off in his 500-horsepower Shelby Cobra, painted white with a blue stripe down the center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 16, 2003
At frequent intervals throughout the season, you can count on an awful pile-up. No, I'm not talking about the Baltimore Beltway, but the musical calendar. There's another collision heading our way on Sunday, when you can choose from an abundance of aural enticements. Unless there's an amazing advance in human cloning over the next few days, it will be impossible to catch them all, but it sure looks like it could be fun trying. Blandine Rannou Starting chronologically, there's a recital by Blandine Rannou, a highly regarded harpsichordist, presented by the French Embassy, part of a French baroque concert series this season in cooperation with the French American Cultural Foundation and An die Musik, the Baltimore classical recording retailer.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 12, 1998
Perhaps I should be forbidden from attending performances of Saint-Saens' "Samson et Dalila." At every production I go to, disaster strikes ahead of schedule. Moments before the blinded and buzz-cut Hebrew strongman is about to wreak Yahweh's vengeance upon the erring Philistines, the temple walls and the statue of their god, Dagon, inevitably begin to collapse.It was scarcely a surprise, therefore, when this scenario repeated itself Saturday night in the Opera House of the Kennedy Center at the first performance of the Washington Opera's new staging of the opera.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | March 27, 1995
Bizet's "Carmen" is so familiar that one tends to take it for granted. But any performance -- even a mediocre one -- makes it impossible to take for granted so daring, so dramatically imaginative and so psychologically penetrating a piece of musical theater. And when a performance is as provocative, intelligently staged, cast, designed and performed as the Washington Opera's new production, which opened Saturday night at the Kennedy Center, "Carmen" is overwhelming.The concept behind director Ann-Margret Pettersson's staging of "Carmen" is simple, powerful and true to Bizet's music and his libretto.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2010
The opera singer who eventually became Dr. Robert A. Montgomery's wife would never have taken him for a kidney transplant surgeon the first time she saw him, not with the long hair and that outrageous mustache. Maybe a biker, she figured, and maybe she was onto something there. When he heads for work at Johns Hopkins Hospital from his loft in Fells Point or the manse he shares in Bethesda with Denyce Graves, the internationally known mezzo soprano, Montgomery roars off in his 500-horsepower Shelby Cobra, painted white with a blue stripe down the center.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 22, 2003
Recent musical events in the area touched on the ridiculous, the sublime and points in between. Every now and then, it's a good idea to have your artistic notions given a stiff kick. That's what a group of cultural revolutionaries delivered in the 1960s through a movement known as Fluxus, creating "event scores" far outside the mainstream. Last week, two veteran Fluxists, Alison Knowles and Larry Miller, collaborated with students at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County in the Fine Arts Recital Hall for a whole bunch of event scores.
NEWS
August 15, 2014
Singer-songwriter Melissa Etheridge, country legend Kenny Rogers and rock group Train were added on Friday to the talent lineup for Sept. 13's Star-Spangled Spectacular concert at Pier Six Pavilion. Also just announced: singer Jordin Sparks will join John Lithgow to co-host the event. The concert, a celebration of the bicentennial of the writing of the national anthem, also features performances by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Broadway star Kristin Chenoweth, country group Little Big Town, a cappella group Pentatonix, Motown legend Smokey Robinson, mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves-Montgomery and performers from the off-Broadway show "Stomp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By tim smith and tim smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 13, 2008
When it was new, Bizet's Carmen generated little enthusiasm among the operatic intelligentsia. Typical of the reaction was this from The New York Times, after the opera's first U.S. performance in 1878: "As a work of art, it is naught." Even its tunefulness was called into question: "Of melody, as the term is generally understood, there is but little" said the Boston Gazette. Makes you wonder what kind of meds those guys were on. Needless to say, no amount of carping could ever stop Carmen from becoming one of the world's most popular operas.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 22, 2003
Recent musical events in the area touched on the ridiculous, the sublime and points in between. Every now and then, it's a good idea to have your artistic notions given a stiff kick. That's what a group of cultural revolutionaries delivered in the 1960s through a movement known as Fluxus, creating "event scores" far outside the mainstream. Last week, two veteran Fluxists, Alison Knowles and Larry Miller, collaborated with students at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County in the Fine Arts Recital Hall for a whole bunch of event scores.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 16, 2003
At frequent intervals throughout the season, you can count on an awful pile-up. No, I'm not talking about the Baltimore Beltway, but the musical calendar. There's another collision heading our way on Sunday, when you can choose from an abundance of aural enticements. Unless there's an amazing advance in human cloning over the next few days, it will be impossible to catch them all, but it sure looks like it could be fun trying. Blandine Rannou Starting chronologically, there's a recital by Blandine Rannou, a highly regarded harpsichordist, presented by the French Embassy, part of a French baroque concert series this season in cooperation with the French American Cultural Foundation and An die Musik, the Baltimore classical recording retailer.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 12, 1998
Perhaps I should be forbidden from attending performances of Saint-Saens' "Samson et Dalila." At every production I go to, disaster strikes ahead of schedule. Moments before the blinded and buzz-cut Hebrew strongman is about to wreak Yahweh's vengeance upon the erring Philistines, the temple walls and the statue of their god, Dagon, inevitably begin to collapse.It was scarcely a surprise, therefore, when this scenario repeated itself Saturday night in the Opera House of the Kennedy Center at the first performance of the Washington Opera's new staging of the opera.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | March 27, 1995
Bizet's "Carmen" is so familiar that one tends to take it for granted. But any performance -- even a mediocre one -- makes it impossible to take for granted so daring, so dramatically imaginative and so psychologically penetrating a piece of musical theater. And when a performance is as provocative, intelligently staged, cast, designed and performed as the Washington Opera's new production, which opened Saturday night at the Kennedy Center, "Carmen" is overwhelming.The concept behind director Ann-Margret Pettersson's staging of "Carmen" is simple, powerful and true to Bizet's music and his libretto.
SPORTS
May 1, 1995
GAME FACTS* Gates open: Noon today* Batting practice: Orioles, 12:30 p.m.; Brewers, 1:30 p.m.* Pre-game ceremonies: 2:38 p.m.* Ceremonial first pitch: Orioles announcer Chuck Thompson* First pitch: 3:05 p.m.* National anthem: Denyce Graves, Washington Opera Company* Tickets: Sold out* Weather: Partly sunny. Highs in the mid to upper 60s. Northwest winds 10 to 15 mph diminishing in the afternoon.* TV: Channel 13, 2 p.m.* Radio: WBAL (1090 AM)PROJECTED LINEUPSBALTIMORE ORIOLESBrady Anderson, LFManny Alexander, 2BRafael Palmeiro, 1BCal Ripken, SSHarold Baines, DHChris Hoiles, CAndy Van Slyke, CFLeo Gomez, 3BJeffrey Hammonds, RF0$ * Starting pitcher: Mike MussinaMILWAUKEE BREWERSPat Listach, 2BDarryl Hamilton, CFKevin Seitzer, 3BGreg Vaughn, DHDerrick May, LFJohn Jaha, 1BTurner Ward, RFJoe Oliver, CJose Valentin, SS3# Starting pitcher: Ricky Bones *
TRAVEL
April 12, 2009
Where:: The Lincoln Memorial, Washington When:: 3 p.m. Sunday What:: In 1939, opera singer Marian Anderson was set to perform at Constitution Hall but was turned away when organizers realized she was black. Instead, the Easter concert was held at the Lincoln Memorial. Sunday's event features mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves in a performance paying tribute to the 70th anniversary of Anderson's concert. Graves will be joined by a cappella group Sweet Honey in the Rock. A naturalization ceremony will precede the concert, with a keynote address from former Secretary of State Colin Powell.
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