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By New York Times News Service | March 6, 1994
Whatever else can be said of the behind-schedule, over-budget, far-flung new Denver International Airport, it will surely make life easier for some travelers. But for skiers headed west to the ski slopes, the $3.2 billion airport will not be so convenient.DIA, the first major airport to be built from scratch in the United States since Dallas-Fort Worth 20 years ago, is set to open May 15, eight months late and more than $1 billion over initial cost estimates.The new facility is situated 23 miles northeast of downtown Denver, about 20 miles farther northeast of the city than Stapleton Airport.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
BWI-Marshall Airport ranks fourth in the nation when it comes to U.S. airports that offer travelers the healthiest food options, according to a recent report by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. The airport improved its standing significantly from last year's Airport Food Review, when it ranked near the bottom - 10th place - in the survey of large airports. This year, the report found that 80 percent of the restaurants at BWI offer healthful menu items that include vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
BWI-Marshall Airport ranks fourth in the nation when it comes to U.S. airports that offer travelers the healthiest food options, according to a recent report by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. The airport improved its standing significantly from last year's Airport Food Review, when it ranked near the bottom - 10th place - in the survey of large airports. This year, the report found that 80 percent of the restaurants at BWI offer healthful menu items that include vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes.
NEWS
By Stephanie Simon and Stephanie Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2008
DENVER -- It was a heck of a drive for a plate of pasta. Visiting friends in Colorado for the holidays, Mike Watts and his father decided on a whim to take a spin to the mountains for lunch. They made it to a Ruby Tuesday's about 60 miles west of Denver. Then the winds kicked up. Twenty-four hours later, they were still stranded. "It's a mess," groaned Watts, 20, speaking by phone from a shelter in the town of Silverthorne. Nearly 3,000 travelers were trapped in the high country from early Sunday evening through late yesterday after gusting winds - and the threat of avalanches - forced authorities to close a 70-mile stretch of the Interstate 70 highway.
NEWS
By Stephanie Simon and Stephanie Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2008
DENVER -- It was a heck of a drive for a plate of pasta. Visiting friends in Colorado for the holidays, Mike Watts and his father decided on a whim to take a spin to the mountains for lunch. They made it to a Ruby Tuesday's about 60 miles west of Denver. Then the winds kicked up. Twenty-four hours later, they were still stranded. "It's a mess," groaned Watts, 20, speaking by phone from a shelter in the town of Silverthorne. Nearly 3,000 travelers were trapped in the high country from early Sunday evening through late yesterday after gusting winds - and the threat of avalanches - forced authorities to close a 70-mile stretch of the Interstate 70 highway.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2004
The past four months have been tough for Carmelo Anthony, tougher than just about anything he has had to face in his 20 years on Earth. But the Baltimore native, by his reckoning, hasn't let the stress of the moment change him. "It takes a strong person to deal with all this stuff, to be the same person," Anthony said by phone Friday night from Denver. "Even though all this stuff is going on, I'm still the same person. Nothing has changed, and I realize that. Nothing in this world will be able to take away my family, my identity and this game of basketball, which is something that I love to play."
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
The Transportation Security Administration identified and seized more firearms at U.S. airports in 2013 than in any year since records have been kept - including more than two dozen at airports in the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area. Nationwide, the TSA caught 1,813 guns at airport checkpoints in 2013, a 16.5 percent increase over the 1,556 guns it captured in 2012, it announced Friday. The TSA screened nearly 639 million passengers in 2013, about 1.1 million more than last year.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | June 16, 1992
Riots, floods, earthquakes and economic instability.In the tumultuous 1990s, each can play a negative role in the credit quality of municipal bonds. Just as creditworthiness of individuals has been put under a magnifying glass by the recession, so are these issues under scrutiny.The Los Angeles riots, for example, increased concern about the already-clouded fiscal situation of the state of California. The flooding of Chicago's underground tunnel system means debt rating services will continue to monitor for potential liabilities.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2004
Denver Nuggets forward Carmelo Anthony, a Baltimore native whose image has taken several whacks of late, has been on a letter-writing campaign to rehabilitate his persona. According to the Denver Post, Anthony sent personal letters to several high-profile NBA executives - including league commissioner David Stern - in the wake of a nightclub scuffle, a citation for marijuana possession, and, most notably, his run-ins with U.S. national team coach Larry Brown during this past summer's Olympic Games.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1995
Chrysler boosts minivan rebatesProviding further evidence that a critical segment of the auto market is weakening, Chrysler Corp. increased the rebates on its minivans yesterday for the second time in a month. The new marketing incentives are as much as $2,500.Rebates have been rising in the industry since the beginning of the year, as dealers' inventories have begun backing up.Before yesterday, Chrysler had offered rebates ranging from $500 to $1,000 on its minivans.Air South ousts CEO O'SheaAir South, a fledgling discount airline losing $1 million a month and flying planes less than half full, ousted its founder from daily operations, the company said yesterday.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2004
The past four months have been tough for Carmelo Anthony, tougher than just about anything he has had to face in his 20 years on Earth. But the Baltimore native, by his reckoning, hasn't let the stress of the moment change him. "It takes a strong person to deal with all this stuff, to be the same person," Anthony said by phone Friday night from Denver. "Even though all this stuff is going on, I'm still the same person. Nothing has changed, and I realize that. Nothing in this world will be able to take away my family, my identity and this game of basketball, which is something that I love to play."
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | March 6, 1994
Whatever else can be said of the behind-schedule, over-budget, far-flung new Denver International Airport, it will surely make life easier for some travelers. But for skiers headed west to the ski slopes, the $3.2 billion airport will not be so convenient.DIA, the first major airport to be built from scratch in the United States since Dallas-Fort Worth 20 years ago, is set to open May 15, eight months late and more than $1 billion over initial cost estimates.The new facility is situated 23 miles northeast of downtown Denver, about 20 miles farther northeast of the city than Stapleton Airport.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1994
Agreement reached on redliningAnother East Coast regional bank criticized for alleged redlining practices has agreed to change its lending policies and make loans to low-income neighborhoods in the Bronx.National Westminster Bancorp. said yesterday that it will lend in minority neighborhoods of the South Bronx and open an office there under an agreement with Inner City Press-Community On the Move, a group that accused the bank of redlining.The agreement follows a similar deal between the government and Chevy Chase Federal Savings Bank, a Maryland savings and loan charged in a civil suit with redlining -- refusing to lend in an area on the basis of its racial makeup.
NEWS
May 24, 1994
It's easy to poke fun at the repeated failure to open Denver's new $3.2 billion mega-airport. But it's just as easy to miss the point of what has so far been a monumental fiasco. The project is eight months behind schedule, $1.5 billion over budget and costs $1 million a day in debt service without earning a penny. When it finally opens -- no one is now foolhardy enough to predict a date -- Denver International Airport will not handle nearly the initial traffic predicted when it was planned.
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