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NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | January 21, 1992
Washington -- Politicians should take time out from their agonized writhings over the health system and absorb instruction from a field of patient care that's a spectacular success: dentistry, a health profession so effective in practicing prevention that it has seriously crimped its own business.While medical schools continue to receive an abundance of applicants, several dental schools have closed in recent years for lack of candidates. Applications have declined because word has got around that dentistry isn't the booming profession that it used to be.vTC The reason is that prevention, the strategic centerpiece of modern dentistry, really works for a great majority of the 'N population.
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Henry F. Cerny, a dentist who had a practice in Westminster for nearly 30 years, died June 28 at the Golden Living Center in Westminster of complications from a fall. He was 94. A native of Baltimore, Dr. Cerny was a 1937 graduate of Kenwood High School and a 1943 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Dentistry. He also spent a year at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy before joining the Army. He served as a captain in the U.S. Public Health Service. While with the service, Dr. Cerny spent time as a dentist at Leavenworth Penitentiary in Kansas.
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BUSINESS
October 4, 1996
USBiomaterials Inc., which is based in White Marsh, has received clearance from the Food and Drug Administration to market its PerioGlas product for wider uses in dentistry.Specifically, the FDA said that PerioGlas, which is made from calcium and sodium salts, phosphorus and silicon, could be marketed for use in ridge augmentation procedures and repairing and filling sockets after teeth are extracted.Until the broader use clearance from the FDA was issued Wednesday, the company could market the product to the dentistry profession only for use in repairing bone defects caused by periodontal disease.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 24, 2014
Dr. Richard Grubb, a dentist from Havre de Grace, was elected an Honored Fellow at the American Academy of Implant Dentistry's 62nd Annual Meeting. The Honored Fellow designation is awarded to members of the AAID who, through their professional, clinical, research or academic endeavors, have distinguished themselves within implant dentistry. Established in 1951, the AAID is the oldest implant organization in the world. The Academy is the only implant organization that offers implant credentials protected by federal court decisions.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Write | November 21, 1994
The oldest dental school in the country -- the University of Maryland -- is here in Baltimore.The National Museum of Dentistry is here.And now, the first international dentistry fraternity is in the neighborhood, too."This is dentistry city," said Roger J. Spott, president of Alpha Omega, the international fraternity of Jewish dentists, which dedicated its new headquarters in Pikesville yesterday.Minutes later, a gathering of about 100 fraternity members and their spouses -- some from overseas -- watched as Dr. Spott of Potomac affixed a mezuza to the outer door frame of the second-floor office suite, signaling the fraternity's arrival in its new home.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2000
Dr. Maria Silberkweit, who fled Adolf Hitler's Germany during World War II and later became an esteemed and long-serving faculty member at Howard University's College of Dentistry, died Friday of pneumonia at Northwest Hospital Center in Randallstown. She was 96. Born in Konigsberg, Germany, now Kaliningrad, Russia, the former Maria Rabinowitz was the daughter of a Lithuanian physician. She studied dentistry at the University of Leipzig, Germany, receiving her doctorate in dentistry in 1929.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1997
Gardner P.H. Foley Sr., who spent nearly 70 years chronicling the painful, historic, comic and more bizarre moments in dentistry, died of pneumonia May 11 at Sinai Hospital. The Roland Park resident was 95.Considered the dean of America's dental historians, Mr. Foley had taught English at the University of Mississippi for a short time before coming to the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery at the University of Maryland Dental School in 1928.He taught English to pre-dental students and, in 1942, was asked by J. Ben Robinson, the dean of the dental school, to teach dental history and literature.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2005
During a four-month tenure at a Columbia dentistry, a Glen Burnie woman claims she was unwillingly subjected to the ways of the Church of Scientology and then unjustly fired. She alleges she had to take a personality test primarily used by Scientologists before she was hired. She claims she had to attend seminars based on the teachings of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard. And she maintains her employer told her that her lifestyle didn't mesh with the Scientology philosophy and then fired her. Tammy Bright, 44, is now suing Smile Savers Dentistry for $400,000, accusing it of discrimination because she did not adapt her religious beliefs to Scientology.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
Dr. Vernon F. Ottenritter, a retired Baltimore dentist and World War II veteran, died Monday at his Timonium home from complications of a fall. He was 87. Vernon Francis Ottenritter was born in Baltimore and raised on Springfield Avenue in the city's Pen Lucy neighborhood. After graduating from City College in 1943, he enlisted in the Air Force. The flight officer was discharged in 1945. His decorations included the American Theater Ribbon, Victory Ribbon, World War II and the Good Conduct Medal.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2001
Prison could not quell William Addis' industrious spirit. One day, the 18th-century Englishman swiped a bone from his jail's soup pot. Over the next days, he whittled it into a handle. Then, he bribed a guard to bring him bristles and glue. He used those ingredients to fashion a toothbrush. Addis' ingenuity spawned a toothbrush dynasty that would see his descendants become England's leading dental health suppliers. During World War II, they slipped miniature maps of Germany into the hollow shafts of brushes produced for the army, so if captured, soldiers might have help escaping.
HEALTH
By Sarah Hainesworth, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
When his private dentist passed away, Henry Yeakel quickly searched for a new dental home. While some might have thumbed through a phone book to find the closest provider, Yeakel didn't have that luxury. He needed a dentist who could cater to his unique dental needs. "My teeth were brittle and breaking and falling apart," said Yeakel, who was diagnosed with AIDS in 1997. "I guess all the medication I was on probably destroyed my teeth. " It used to take Yeakel more than 30 minutes to complete his daily regimen of medication, which consisted of 32 pills twice a day. Yeakel's search for a new dentist led him to the Plus clinic at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry.
NEWS
October 2, 2013
The first sentence I heard in the first lecture of my first year at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry in 1970 was "in America, health care is a right, not a privilege. " It took another 40 years for a true national health insurance bill to be passed, and to those who oppose it on ideological grounds I say: Deal with it! The toothpaste is out of the tube and the train has pulled out of the station. A more constructive approach than repeatedly trying to terminate the law would be to identify those portions of it that need to be improved and amend it. America needs a healthy population to compete with other advanced countries and to maintain a strong national security.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
Dr. Drexel M. "Drex" Johnston, a retired Bel Air dentist and World War II pilot who was a lifelong aviation enthusiast, died July 6 of complications from a stroke at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center. He was 91. "Drex was a true Renaissance man, bon vivant and devoted husband," said Todd Holden, a former Aegis reporter and photographer who was a longtime friend. "He was both witty and caustic, and I enjoyed playing golf with him. " "He was quite unique and recognizable in both looks, carriage and deportment," said Sam Spicer, a fellow aviator and friend.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
Dr. Vernon F. Ottenritter, a retired Baltimore dentist and World War II veteran, died Monday at his Timonium home from complications of a fall. He was 87. Vernon Francis Ottenritter was born in Baltimore and raised on Springfield Avenue in the city's Pen Lucy neighborhood. After graduating from City College in 1943, he enlisted in the Air Force. The flight officer was discharged in 1945. His decorations included the American Theater Ribbon, Victory Ribbon, World War II and the Good Conduct Medal.
HEALTH
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
When he gets talking about his lab, Gary Hack sounds like he's composing science fiction — a mix of technological wonder and unsettling questions about machines rendering humanity useless. Even the name of the space, the Dream Room, suggests epic horizons. Here's the funny thing: Gary Hack is a dentist. Actually, he's a professor of dentistry at the University of Maryland. Yes, this futurist works in the realm of childhood nightmares, of medieval-looking metal devices and goopy gels that never actually taste like cherry or bubble gum. But it's Hack's charge at the School of Dentistry to find the frontier.
EXPLORE
October 3, 2011
Bel Air Pediatric Dentistry recently opened an office in Bel Air to provide comprehensive dental care for infants, children and adolescents. Husband and wife doctors Kapil and Vidhima "Sheena" Davar, who specialize in pediatric dentistry, and the staff at Bel Air Pediatric Dentistry offer early dental care and sedation dentistry for patients from infancy through age 20. "Early dental care can provide a lifetime of healthy smiles. Children should see a pediatric dentist when their first tooth appears, usually between 6 and 12 months of age, and no later than their first birthday," Kapil Davar said.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | March 16, 2003
In the past five years, 132 new teeth-whitening devices have been introduced, including strips, toothpaste and gum. Over the same period, the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry reports that customer requests for dentists to perform teeth whitening procedures have risen more than 300 percent.
NEWS
April 17, 2005
Dr. Donald Kramer, who practiced dentistry in the Baltimore area for more than 40 years, died of pneumonia Wednesday at North Oaks Retirement Community. He was 84. Born and raised in Baltimore, he was a 1938 graduate of City College and earned his bachelor's degree in 1942 from the University of Maryland. He served in the Navy during World War II, attaining the rank of lieutenant and also attending the University of Maryland Dental School, from which he graduated in 1945. Dr. Kramer began his practice in an office on Walbrook Avenue, and later moved to Liberty Road in Randallstown.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 18, 2011
Dr. Joseph Giardina, a retired Baltimore County dentist who was an early advocate for understanding the educational needs of dyslexic students, died of kidney failure Sept. 9 at his Phoenix, Baltimore County, home. He was 82. Born in Baltimore and raised on West Fayette Street, he was a 1948 graduate of Polytechnic Institute, where he played football. He remained active in the school's alumni association. While in the Army and serving in Germany, he also competed on a military football team.
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