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NEWS
June 20, 2012
Regarding Dan Rodricks ' column on Wall Street and dental insurance, he seems to think that everyone who invests in the stock market and Wall Street is wealthy and can carry the economy, health care and a multitude of other liberal causes ("Wall Street pays, the nation smiles," June 17). I am invested in Wall Street, and I am not wealthy by a long shot. I invest because the return on bank savings and other institutions is paltry and does not cover inflation. Mr. Rodricks should take another look at Wall Street.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2014
When the bill arrived from CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, I expected to open it and see that I owed $250 by March 15. Instead it was for $286. That's $36 more than Maryland health exchange website showed my insurance plan would cost. This was the latest snafu in my quest to buy health insurance through the state's troubled online exchange, which has been beset for months by technical problems. The enrollment process took me five hours and 22 minutes and included two calls to the exchange's call center, seven attempts to enter my personal information, two computers and two web browsers.
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BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 16, 2001
Consumer Dental Care, a dental insurance plan with headquarters in Calverton and 100,000 members in the state, will be acquired by DentaQuest Ventures Inc. of Massachusetts. Consumer Dental's staff and management will continue to operate as DentaQuest's mid-Atlantic region providers, Fay Donohue-Rolfe, executive vice president of DentaQuest's parent firm, said yesterday. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Members will "still have the same dentist, still have the same card, still have the same price - they'll have the same everything," she said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 16, 2014
Those who have dental insurance don't always use it to get care, according to a new study from the University of Maryland School of Dentistry . The researchers found that education is needed before people value their dental health, which can impact their overall health. “You can't just hand people coverage and say, 'there, that's better,'” said Richard J. Manski, professor and chief of Dental Public Health at the dental school. “You need to offer some inducements, some promotional campaign to change people's attitudes and beliefs.
BUSINESS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Sun Staff Writer | November 18, 1994
Consumers are increasingly likely to get their dental care through a dental health maintenance organization, a relatively new concept that is catching on as employers seek a cheaper alternative to traditional insurance.Enrollment in dental HMOs shot up from about eight million in 1990 to 13.5 million in 1993 -- about 11 percent of all people with dental insurance, according to the National Association of Dental Plans, a managed dental care trade group.HMO dental insurers are growing to serve the bigger market.
NEWS
December 1, 1993
Anyone who has ever suffered through an abscessed tooth knows first hand that a toothache can be as debilitating as any other bodily complaint. Yet many of the same Americans who would never dream of putting up with a throat infection without medical help routinely put off seeing a dentist when a tooth acts up. Meanwhile, the problems worsen. Why? In large part, because far more Americans live without dental insurance than medical coverage.The Clinton health care proposal does not solve this problem.
NEWS
March 30, 2013
Thank you for placing John Fritze's article on children's dental insurance on your front page ("Concerns rise over cost of child dental insurance," March 22). I applaud U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin and his continued focus on the importance of oral health care access for our children. As reported by the Surgeon General 13 years ago, tooth decay is the most common chronic childhood disease. Nearly 80 percent of the disease is borne by about 25 percent of our population. These are the children who need the essential health benefits the most, and they are the ones most likely to be vulnerable to delays in enrollment and inability to utilize dental services if their parents cannot afford to pay for coverage.
NEWS
September 16, 1996
IF YOU BREAK your leg, an emergency room will treat you. But suffer the excruciating pain of an abscessed tooth and unless you have adequate dental insurance or can afford to pay for care, you're out of luck. The most a hospital will offer you is a pain killer or two and maybe an antibiotic for the infection.Dental care is a low priority in Maryland, and the state has the statistics to prove it. Although the state ranks 27th in the number of people who contract oral cancer, poor screening for the problem pushes Maryland to fourth in the country in the number of deaths.
EXPLORE
February 23, 2012
Editor: In response to Allan Vought's ETC article regarding teachers pay, published Feb. 17, I can only wholeheartedly agree with his opinion. Even though I am a working retired person, when I worked full time, my average working day was 10 to 12 hours, 50 weeks a year. I sold for a living and was salaried with potential for bonuses if I worked hard and produced. Sometimes the bonuses were there and sometimes not. I had no job protection and if I did not produce, I could be terminated quickly.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 16, 2014
Those who have dental insurance don't always use it to get care, according to a new study from the University of Maryland School of Dentistry . The researchers found that education is needed before people value their dental health, which can impact their overall health. “You can't just hand people coverage and say, 'there, that's better,'” said Richard J. Manski, professor and chief of Dental Public Health at the dental school. “You need to offer some inducements, some promotional campaign to change people's attitudes and beliefs.
NEWS
March 30, 2013
Thank you for placing John Fritze's article on children's dental insurance on your front page ("Concerns rise over cost of child dental insurance," March 22). I applaud U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin and his continued focus on the importance of oral health care access for our children. As reported by the Surgeon General 13 years ago, tooth decay is the most common chronic childhood disease. Nearly 80 percent of the disease is borne by about 25 percent of our population. These are the children who need the essential health benefits the most, and they are the ones most likely to be vulnerable to delays in enrollment and inability to utilize dental services if their parents cannot afford to pay for coverage.
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Like most 3-year-olds, Mariah Venable is a climber and a jumper. And sometimes she lands on her face instead of her legs. Her acrobatic attempts have cost her two baby teeth already - and have left her mother thankful she has good dental insurance. "You have to start on their teeth early so they don't have issues when they get older," said Cheryl Venable, who recently took her daughter - smiling wide through the gaps - to a city clinic that offers dental care to low-income and uninsured families.
NEWS
June 20, 2012
Regarding Dan Rodricks ' column on Wall Street and dental insurance, he seems to think that everyone who invests in the stock market and Wall Street is wealthy and can carry the economy, health care and a multitude of other liberal causes ("Wall Street pays, the nation smiles," June 17). I am invested in Wall Street, and I am not wealthy by a long shot. I invest because the return on bank savings and other institutions is paltry and does not cover inflation. Mr. Rodricks should take another look at Wall Street.
EXPLORE
February 23, 2012
Editor: In response to Allan Vought's ETC article regarding teachers pay, published Feb. 17, I can only wholeheartedly agree with his opinion. Even though I am a working retired person, when I worked full time, my average working day was 10 to 12 hours, 50 weeks a year. I sold for a living and was salaried with potential for bonuses if I worked hard and produced. Sometimes the bonuses were there and sometimes not. I had no job protection and if I did not produce, I could be terminated quickly.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2011
The O'Malley administration will introduce legislation in the coming General Assembly that would create the exchanges where people will buy affordable insurance under health care reform. The Board of the Maryland Health Benefit Exchange, a group convened to plan and implement the exchanges, released recommendations Tuesday for how they would work. While the board outlined a setup for the exchanges, it put off a decision on how to fund the exchanges until next year. The federal government provides money to run the exchanges during the first year of reform in 2014, but states are responsible after that.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | May 25, 2008
The first dental clinic run by Harford County opened officially last week in Edgewood with a ribbon cutting, but the facility has been treating patients since March 31. That has been long enough for 8-year-old Razell Fogle to have a cracked tooth repaired and another filled. He smiled broadly, showing off his recently cleaned teeth, as he helped cut the ribbon. With no dental insurance, Julia Fogle had no idea when she would be able to find money for her son's dental needs, until the clinic, in Edgewood Plaza Shopping Center on Hanson Road, offered her free care.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | February 3, 1993
Building on a program to provide health care for needy children, Anne Arundel County Executive Robert R. Neall announced yesterday that his administration is providing a year's worth of dental insurance for 400 youngsters.The dental benefits, which became available Monday, will cover annual examinations and cleanings, X-rays, extractions and fillings.Last fall, as part of the same program, the county bought TC year's worth of medical benefits for 400 children. Those benefits cover preventive care and visits to the doctor, but not hospitalization.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | May 25, 2008
The first dental clinic run by Harford County opened officially last week in Edgewood with a ribbon cutting, but the facility has been treating patients since March 31. That has been long enough for 8-year-old Razell Fogle to have a cracked tooth repaired and another filled. He smiled broadly, showing off his recently cleaned teeth, as he helped cut the ribbon. With no dental insurance, Julia Fogle had no idea when she would be able to find money for her son's dental needs, until the clinic, in Edgewood Plaza Shopping Center on Hanson Road, offered her free care.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
Keswanna Edwards was beaming, every tiny tooth bared. "I don't have any cavvies!" said the 5-year-old, "because I didn't eat a bunch of candy." Keswanna's mother, Rosalind Wilson, had never taken the prekindergartner or her 2-year-old sister Keshanwa to the dentist. And although she steers her girls away from sweets, she still worried about their little teeth. So Wilson was first in line last week when Lockerman-Bundy Elementary School paired up with United Concordia Cos. Inc. -- one of the largest dental insurers in the country -- to provide a free dental health clinic for the school's 218 pupils, their siblings and their friends.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2001
State Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen ruled yesterday that a nonprofit dental insurer converting to for-profit status must pay $471,728 to the Maryland Health Care Foundation. A consultant for the insurer had said the payment should be $170,000; a consultant hired by Larsen had said $939,000. Each consultant presented the rationale for his figures at a hearing before Larsen in June. The case attracted interest because it could give an indication of how Larsen might deal with a conversion of CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield.
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