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NEWS
September 8, 2004
On August 31, 2004, JAMES CHARLES DENT, JR., devoted husband of Janice Dent, beloved father of James III, Shenae and Sherre; also survived by other loving relatives and friends. Friends may call at the Joseph L. Russ Funeral Home, 2222-26 W. North Ave., on Thursday from 3 to 8 P.M. Family hour: Friday, 10:30 A.M, with funeral to follow at 11, at St. Matthew's Catholic Church, 5401 Loch Raven Blvd.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Olivia Griffin gets to her job at Johns Hopkins Hospital an hour early each work day just to make sure she isn't late. It's not an easy feat for the 25-year-old mother of two who relies on the bus and subway for transportation from her West Baltimore home to the East Baltimore campus. But she doesn't mind because she loves her work and hopes to spend her career in health care at Hopkins. "I had training as a medical assistant but I couldn't find a job opportunity," said Griffin, who began work in patient transportation in October but plans on becoming a registered nurse.
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NEWS
March 2, 2004
On February 29, 2004, SIBYL PADGETT of Reisterstown, beloved wife of the late Don J. Dent, Sr., devoted mother of Daniel L. and Don, Jr. Dent, Cathy Smith, Deborah Dent and Mary E. Sharff, dear father-in-law of Mary and Lou Ann Dent, Bill Smith and John Sharff. She is also survived by 13 grandchildren and one great-grandchild. She was predeceased by siblings, the late Hugh and Jewette Padgett and Joan Woods. A Funeral Service will be held at 1 P.M. Thursday at the Haight Funeral Home & Chapel (6416 Sykesville Rd)
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Ocean City began the summer with high hopes for a blockbuster season, fueled by a newly rebuilt fishing pier, the return of the Dew Tour and the possibility of an influx of tourists from northern beaches ravaged by superstorm Sandy. But nature had a different vision: rain and lots of it. "It's been a noticeably slower summer, and that's mostly because of the weather," said G. Jordan, manager of Treasure Island Sunglasses, who has worked on the Boardwalk for five years. "The ocean is supposed to offer sun," and when it doesn't, he said, people go elsewhere.
NEWS
December 21, 2011
I read with interest that Baltimore police passed up a saving of $500,000 because of moral issues and the political implications involved in selling department weapons back to the manufacturer ("Police weapon traced to killings," Dec. 18). Your article quoted a former deputy police commissioner as saying that "if one of our guns is used in a crime - or to kill a child, as in this case - we don't want that on our conscience. " It is a shame that this concern for moral issues and political implications can't push Baltimore's judicial system to keep more repeat offenders, the "bad guys with guns," behind bars.
NEWS
April 26, 1991
Services for Benjamin Blackistone Dent, a retired foreman fo the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co., will be held at 1 p.m. tomorrow at All Saints Episcopal Church in the St. Mary's County community of Avenue.Mr. Dent, who was 89, died Wednesday at the Charlestown Care Center in Catonsville.A native of St. Mary's County, Mr. Dent was a direct descendant of one of Maryland's original settlers. He had lived in recent years at Denton Farm, a 450-acre property that has been in his family for generations.
SPORTS
By Frank Roylance and Frank Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2000
Baltimore's Dan Dent was still mushing his way down the Iditarod Trail yesterday despite crashing into a tree early Tuesday and losing 14 of his 16 dogs in the rugged Alaska Range. Dent, 58, was last reported at the Rohn Roadhouse. That's 272 miles from the starting line near Anchorage, and 879 miles from the finish in Nome. The Baltimore investment counselor was running 68th in the field of 79, about 200 miles behind the leader, Doug Swingley. Trail reports said Dent's sled struck a tree on a treacherous bit of hillside trail five miles from Rainy Pass.
NEWS
April 19, 2002
Margaret Pierce Dent, a law school graduate, equal-rights advocate and full-time homemaker, died Saturday at her Kingsville home of complications related to emphysema. She was 90. A Michigan native, she graduated third in her class from the University of Baltimore Law School in 1936 and became a member of the Maryland State Bar Association, but was unable to practice law because she was a woman. She later worked as a legal secretary and for the Social Security Administration. She met her husband, Walter P. Dent Jr., now a retired sales manager for Fireline Corp.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | May 22, 2008
Walter P. Dent Jr., a retired sales representative and gardener, died Monday in his sleep at the home of his caregiver in Belcamp. He was 98. Mr. Dent was born in Oakley, St. Mary's County, and was raised in Baltimore and Washington. During World War I, he moved to Fort Fisher, N.C., to live with his mother's grandfather. After his father returned from World War I, he moved with his family to Philadelphia. He later moved to Oakley, where he graduated from River Springs High in 1927. After earning a bachelor's degree in history from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1932, he worked in sales for Crowell Collier Publishing Co. From 1959 until he retired in 1981, he sold fire-extinguishing equipment for Fireline Corp.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | January 17, 1995
SAN DIEGO -- Two years ago, Susan Hemond-Dent was making her way across Madagascar -- sky diving, scaling cliffs, hiking deserts, canoeing whitewater and kayaking the ocean.Sounds like a great outdoors vacation, right? Wrong.Hemond-Dent, the 35-year-old daughter of Orioles general manager Roland Hemond, and four other members of a team named American Pride were racing across Madagascar in the Raid Gauloises, the ultimate endurance survival race."I did the 1992 race in Oman, too," said Hemond-Dent, a reserve sewerman on the all-woman America's Cup boat, America3.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
When Syracuse opened the season with a 16-15 double-overtime loss to Albany, the outlook looked bleak for the NCAA's all-time leader in national championships. But the No. 12 Orange re-asserted themselves into the national conversation with back-to-back wins, including a 9-8 overtime decision against then-No. 11 Virginia last Friday night. The joy from that victory may be evaporating in the wake of Thursday's announcement by the school that sophomore defenseman Brandon Mullins will miss the remainder of the season after suffering a right knee injury in that win against the Cavaliers.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
After the Mount Vernon United Methodist Church was ravaged by a lightning-strike fire four years ago, the Hampden neighborhood was left with what appeared to be an unusable building. But Mark Dent saw more than a burned-out shell of an old stone church. He saw the future home of Chesapeake Systems, the 25-person computer company he co-owns. Still, the rebirth of the burned out church as a commercial building almost didn't happen. Dent's company spent months — and thousands of dollars — trying to work through the city's antiquated zoning law. As the process dragged on, he thought seriously about moving out of Baltimore, to an office park off Interstate 95. The city hopes to avoid such near-misses with a far-reaching piece of legislation, "Transform Baltimore," that would replace the city's decades-old zoning law. The new law is designed to be more understandable, speed up the zoning process, and discourage ad hoc zoning layers that are being used to sidestep outmoded rules.
NEWS
December 21, 2011
I read with interest that Baltimore police passed up a saving of $500,000 because of moral issues and the political implications involved in selling department weapons back to the manufacturer ("Police weapon traced to killings," Dec. 18). Your article quoted a former deputy police commissioner as saying that "if one of our guns is used in a crime - or to kill a child, as in this case - we don't want that on our conscience. " It is a shame that this concern for moral issues and political implications can't push Baltimore's judicial system to keep more repeat offenders, the "bad guys with guns," behind bars.
NEWS
June 1, 2011
Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young is absolutely right that the city's school buildings are badly outdated and that the city is not doing nearly enough to reduce the backlog of maintenance problems, estimated at some $2.8 billion. As children are sent home because their non-air-conditioned schools are too hot to provide a conducive learning environment, he has picked a good time to remind the city that the poor state of school facilities has a real effect on academic achievement.
NEWS
February 14, 2011
The spending plan President Barack Obama is releasing today, which includes cuts projected to trim the nation's cumulative budget deficits by about $1.1 trillion over the next decade, guarantees intense debates in the months ahead. It sets up the possibility of showdowns with Republicans — and maybe even a government shutdown — because its spending cuts on discretionary programs are less than the GOP leaders want, and much less than its new tea party caucus is demanding. And at the same time, the president's plan promises very real pain for people who would be affected by the proposed cuts to programs such as energy assistance for the poor, Pell Grants and Community Development Block Grants.
NEWS
April 20, 2010
Baltimore took an important step to increase the city's vibrancy last year when it expanded the ability of bars and restaurants to offer live entertainment. But left somewhat unresolved were the more unsavory aspects of the nightlife we do have. After all, "vibrant city" and "drunken people vomiting in flowerpots" don't really go together. That's why City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young's attention to the issue of nuisance crimes in some of Baltimore's bar-hoppingest neighborhoods is so important.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES | June 29, 2001
WIMBLEDON, England -- Almost every time the lunging Lleyton Hewitt sent up a lob that required a harmless tap to tuck it away, Taylor Dent attacked it with the vigor of a puppy pouncing on a chew toy. Almost every time the powerful Dent tenderized a ball with a serve that topped out at 144 mph, Hewitt had the coiled reflexes to snap it back yesterday during his 1-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-7 (2), 6-3 victory. If the California-born Dent was going to emerge from the backdrop of America's Andy Roddick frenzy, he wanted to drop into the scene with the force of a falling piano.
SPORTS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2000
The dog bites on his hands have healed, and Baltimore businessman Dan Dent is back in the Far North for another shot at his elusive Alaskan dream. Dent and his all-new team of 16 huskies are preparing to leave Anchorage today with 80 other mushers in the grueling, 1,100-mile Iditarod sled dog race to Nome. The 58-year-old financial adviser's first Iditarod attempt last year ran into a canine buzz saw. Just nine hours into the race, he was severely bitten trying to break up a fight among his dogs.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | October 9, 2009
The nation's governors are caught between the crisis of growing numbers of uninsured residents and proposed federal health care solutions that could make a significant dent in their own battered budgets. States received an indication this week of the price they might pay for health care overhaul. The Congressional Budget Office estimated state spending on Medicaid would increase by about $33 billion over a decade under a leading proposal set for a vote in the Senate Finance Committee next Tuesday.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,Tribune Newspapers | September 5, 2009
NEW YORK - -Taylor Dent, who thought he would be lucky to walk normally after three back surgeries, had 120 winners Friday, hit a 147-mph serve among his 20 aces and finally gave the U.S. Open men's tournament a bit of buzz with his 6-4, 5-7, 6-7 (1), 7-5, 7-6 (9) win over Ivan Navarro in the second round. Former Open champions Venus Williams and Kim Clijsters won third-round matches. They'll play Sunday. Clijsters, back only a month from a two-year retirement and unseeded because of her time off, routed fellow Belgian Kirsten Flipkens, 6-0, 6-2. Third seed Venus Williams beat 46th-ranked Magdalena Rybarikova of Slovakia, 6-2, 7-5, but limped.
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