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Density

NEWS
November 27, 2006
Throughout Baltimore, property owners are looking to go up. Requests to add a third-floor to traditional, two-story rowhouses in some neighborhoods are appearing before the city's zoning board in greater numbers than in the past. They reflect a desire for more living space by residents who want to stay in the city. But Baltimore's outdated zoning code unnecessarily discourages what should be encouraged - a homeowner's impulse to remain in town in a roomier version of a classic Baltimore rowhouse.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | November 12, 2006
As Valerie H. Twanmoh greeted voters outside Youth's Benefit Elementary School, the smile on her face hid her frustration. The Democrat was making her third try at winning a seat on the County Council representing Fallston and Abingdon, and it had seemed as though things could be breaking her way. But she was disheartened by an eleventh-hour mailer sent out by her opponent, Republican Councilwoman Veronica L. "Roni" Chenowith. It portrayed Twanmoh as a big-developer ally who had been booted from her job as zoning hearing examiner.
NEWS
by a sun reporter | November 8, 2006
Higher densities and a relaxation of construction restrictions are needed to address Howard County's acute shortage of affordable housing, according to a draft report by a task force appointed by County Executive James N. Robey in June. The 33-page draft recommends a series of initiatives to meet what it describes as "an indisputable gap between the need for affordable housing and the availability of affordable housing" in the county. The report, a copy of which was obtained by The Sun, warns: "It is inevitable that this gap will continue to grow unless steps are taken to ensure that enough affordable housing is developed to meet the anticipated growth in low and moderate wage jobs in the county, and that existing affordable units are preserved."
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | October 29, 2006
The next phase of the luxury planned community Maple Lawn, Maryland has been approved, clearing the way for 75 additional housing units and four office buildings. In less than two years, the development near Fulton has been transformed from a place where there were only workmen, steel pillars and house frames into a minitown, with residents, retail shops and other businesses. The continuation of that evolution was assured Thursday night when the Planning Board, in three unanimous votes, approved sites developments plans for: Forty townhouses, to be constructed on 2.52 acres by Miller and Smith, a McLean, Va.-based builder.
NEWS
By a Sun reporter | October 22, 2006
Vernon D. Swaback had time to kill four nights ago, so he strolled the downtown lakefront. "You know what was missing?" he asked rhetorically. "People," he answered after a pause. Although he is an admirer of Columbia - "it's a rare place" - Swaback, a renowned urban designer, also said it is disappointing because it has failed to evolve. "Given the opportunity of Columbia, the place right now should be more than it is," he said in an interview. "I don't know, with the exception of adding new buildings and maintaining them, how much of an idea has been added to anything beyond that which was really put together in the 1960s.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN REPORTER | September 29, 2006
A bill that was intended to promote more affordable housing, but which raised development fears among some Howard County residents, is to be withdrawn, according to County Councilman Calvin Ball, an east Columbia Democrat, who is the sponsor. The measure, which would exempt from some zoning restrictions affordable housing on commercially zoned land, is scheduled for a council vote Tuesday night. No one testified on the measure at the public hearing Sept. 19, but critics of county zoning policies raised red flags yesterday, worried that the bill could result in large apartment houses being built on some small lots - projects that could be incompatible with existing homes and businesses.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | September 26, 2006
A broad cross-section of Marylanders favors steering most of the state's expected population growth over the next 25 years into already-existing communities and preserving more rural land than local officials are planning to do, according to a report to be released today. The report, summarizing a series of growth "visioning" workshops last spring, says participants generally agreed there should be a major shift in Maryland's land-use patterns, increasing development density inside the Baltimore and Washington beltways and along transit lines - in some cases beyond what current zoning allows - to spare forests and farmland from the bulldozer.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN and MARY BETH REGAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 2006
I'm a woman in my 40s. I usually get my cardio in each week, but my friends tell me I need to be lifting. Is this true, and how do I get started on something that's not going to take over my entire day? This is one of those times that it makes sense to listen to your friends. Strength training is important for a woman of your age, in part because it helps keep your bones strong. It's not uncommon for women as young as 35 to enter a phase called osteopenia, in which the body starts to lose bone density.
NEWS
By NICK SHIELDS | March 18, 2006
A device containing small amounts of nuclear material was stolen from a contractor's work site in Pikesville, state environment officials said yesterday. The moisture-density gauge was reported stolen about 8:30 a.m. yesterday from the site in the 1700 block of Reisterstown Road, Maryland Department of the Environment officials said. The device, a yellow Troxler Model 3430 with the serial number 23191, contains Cesium-137 and Americium-241, state officials said. The gauge is used to measure moisture and compaction in soils, concrete, asphalt and other aggregates, said Ray Manley, of department's radioactive materials licensing and compliance division.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | February 19, 2006
Harford County Councilman Dion F. Guthrie said after Tuesday's council meeting - in which the council voted to approve a contentious rezoning package - that the county might be wise to look at rezoning more often than once every eight years. And why not? This year's process provided ample theatrics, including barnyard animals parading out front of council chambers, a long-tenured council member changing her vote in what some said was an election-year ploy, and another council member wistfully recalling the good old days when politicians could settle a score by challenging someone to a duel.
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