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NEWS
December 3, 2002
ON A GORGEOUS FALL afternoon in suburban Montgomery County, Lori Feller, a management consultant and mother of a toddler, kneels in her front yard, planting flowers. The yard is tiny. It's hard by a narrow street. It's less than a minute's walk from a busy little downtown of restaurants, doctors' offices, an eight-screen movie theater, varied stores and even apartments above storefronts. Apartments above storefronts? Walking? In suburbia? This is the new suburban dream - countering some of sprawl's environmental, economic and social ills.
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NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | February 20, 2014
Neighboring residents of a planned development that would build 204 single-family homes on 67 acres of undeveloped land in west Columbia are requesting that the developer reduce the density of the property. The development, called Simpson Oaks, is a mix of detached homes and townhouses that would be built on woodlands and open space adjacent to the headquarters of W.R. Grace, a technology company that sells chemicals and specialty building materials, off of Grace Drive near the intersection of Route 32 and Cedar Lane.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
The developer of a five-acre, mixed-use development at the southwest corner of the intersection of West Cold Spring Lane and Interstate 83 is considering adding a fifth floor of residential units to the project. "A transit-oriented development should have a lot of density," said Judy Siegel, chair of the Linthicum-based Landex Companies, after a presentation to Baltimore's Urban Design and Architectural Review Panel on Thursday. It was the second time that early-stage plans for the development, at 2001 W. Cold Spring Lane, were shown to the panel.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
Women with dense breast tissue will now get an extra warning about cancer. Dense breast tissue, while common in women, can make it harder to detect breast cancer . A new state law requires doctors to send women with dense breast tissue a special letter warning of the danger. Together the patient and doctor can decide on what type of screening should be done. Dr. Diana Pack, a radiologist at Anne Arundel Medical Center, explains the new law. What are requirements of the new breast density law and when did it go into effect?
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | July 17, 1991
Opponents of a proposed 722-home planned unit development in Gambrills who lost the first round in March will get a second chance at blocking the project this afternoon before the Board of Zoning Appeals.Saying the development, proposed for 221 acres off Waugh Chapel Road, is incompatible with the rural land and that it would ruin a wilderness habitat, nearby residents want the seven-member panel to overturn a decision by an administrative hearing officer approving the project.Officials said today's testimony should be a replay of the March hearing where opponents streamed to the microphone to criticize the proposal.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | August 6, 2000
IF YOU'RE John Adolphsen, you listen to the wider world scorning NIMBYism and characterizing your point of view with astonishment. Mr. Adolphsen and several of his neighbors in Fulton, just south of Columbia, want to slow down a mega-development planned by the county and Stewart Greenebaum, a developer. They don't want to stop it, he says. They want to change it some, reduce its density and demand accountability from county officials. The slow growth forces, Mr. Adolphsen said, find themselves competing against what he sees as a form of the big lie: the assertion in this case that opponents of the planned development are anti-growth.
NEWS
July 8, 1994
A bank holding company that sought a fivefold increase in the number of homes it could develop on a secluded 14-acre lot on Columbia's southern edge has been told by the county Zoning Board that it will have to settle for less. But it was told the allowed housing density could be doubled.In a work session Wednesday night, County Council members, sitting as the Zoning Board, voted 4-1 to grant "residential-single cluster" zoning for the property on both sides of Old Columbia Road just north of the Middle Patuxent River.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 26, 2005
A proposal to increase the number of housing units at Maple Lawn Maryland was turned down yesterday by the Howard County Planning Board, as had been expected. Several members of the board had expressed strong reservations about allowing greater density at the sprawling development near Fulton, which combines high-end homes with office space and stores. The developer, Greenebaum and Rose Associates Inc., was seeking to build a senior housing complex with 242 units. Technically, the board voted to leave unchanged the development plan approved by the county after marathon hearings five years ago. The 3-1 vote, with one member not attending, had the effect of denying the developer's request to increase the overall density of Maple Lawn to 2.7 units per acre from 2.2 units.
FEATURES
By Dr. Sandra Kammerman and Dr. Sandra Kammerman,Contributing Writer | December 7, 1993
Using supplements to increase calcium intake during pre-teen years may build higher bone density and prevent osteoporosis later in life.Osteoporosis is a disorder -- affecting mostly older women -- that makes bones susceptible to fractures from little or no stress. Areas such as the wrists, hips and spine are especially vulnerable.Osteoporosis occurs when bone mass and density -- the overall amount of bone and its amount per unit volume -- are progressively reduced. This is generally associated with a decrease in the amount of calcium stored in the bone.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1994
Hoping to avoid the congestion and crowded schools of Owings Mills and White Marsh, Baltimore County planners are stressing single-family homes and open space rather than townhouse and apartment complexes in their new proposal for the Honeygo area.The plan, to be unveiled at 7 tonight at Chapel Hill Elementary School, is likely to please residents concerned about the impact of the 3,000-acre planned community but disappoint landowners who wanted higher-density development.The proposal from the Office of Planning and Zoning calls for 4,259 housing units, 80 percent of which would be single-family homes.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
The developer of a five-acre, mixed-use development at the southwest corner of the intersection of West Cold Spring Lane and Interstate 83 is considering adding a fifth floor of residential units to the project. "A transit-oriented development should have a lot of density," said Judy Siegel, chair of the Linthicum-based Landex Companies, after a presentation to Baltimore's Urban Design and Architectural Review Panel on Thursday. It was the second time that early-stage plans for the development, at 2001 W. Cold Spring Lane, were shown to the panel.
EXPLORE
May 15, 2012
I would like to thank Councilman David Marks, the Greater Towson Council of Community Associations, the West Towson Community Association, Nancy Hafford and Scott Jenkins for their assistance in stopping the proposed increase in density at The Colony at Kenilworth. Aimco, the owners of The Colony, have consistently refused to maintain their property in a way that is conducive to comfortable living in Baltimore County. They have refused, until just recently, to communicate and cooperate with Towson University's Student Life organizations to help control their large student population.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2012
Developers in some parts of northeastern Baltimore County would no longer be able to squeeze new properties onto existing lots without a new road, under a bill introduced by three County Council members Monday. The bill, set for a vote next month, would ban new "panhandle lots" in Parkville, Cub Hill and Carney, a move meant to control density. It was introduced by David Marks, a Perry Hall Republican; Cathy Bevins, a Middle River Democrat; and Todd Huff, a Lutherville Republican.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2011
The Baltimore County Council is set to vote on a bill to clarify the rules for so-called in-law apartments, a measure that has drawn strong opposition from community activists who claim that it could allow neighborhoods to become more densely populated than zoning allows. The proposal, to be taken up Tuesday evening, puts guidelines in the code for single-family homeowners who want to set up an apartment in their home to accommodate a relative. The county has procedures it has followed for years that allow this, but up to now there's been nothing in zoning law governing these arrangements.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2011
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has proposed a $3,500 fine on a Virginia company for the temporary loss at the Fort George G. Meade Army Base of a device that contained a small amount of radioactive material. In late 2010, GeoConcepts Engineering, Inc., headquartered in Ashburn, Va., lost a portable nuclear gauge used to measure soil density at construction sites, the NRC said Tuesday in a statement. The company suspected that the gauge had been stolen during a theft of construction equipment on the base, where the item was stored on a temporary job site.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Dozens of Timonium-area residents got welcome news Wednesday night as Baltimore County Councilman Todd Huff announced that he would not support a developer's plan for 33 houses on Pot Spring Road. "I did hear what you said," Huff told the gathering of more than 100 people at Warren Elementary School in Cockeysville. "I agree with you 100 percent. " The announcement was greeted with applause in a gathering that took place four months after more than 200 people met in an often raucous session in the same room, most of them opposed to Catonsville developer Jeffrey C. Kirby's plan to build a gated cluster of 33 homes for people 55 years and older on 10 acres.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 5, 2003
In an unexpected move, the Harford County administration withdrew last night a bill proposing to increase development density for a proposed project on the Perryman peninsula. Nancy Giorno, a lawyer in the county legal department, said County Executive James M. Harkins told her to withdraw the bill to allow a further review of issues at the site. Neighbors reacted cautiously, but were encouraged by the news. "Maybe they're going to come up with a more sensible plan," said Bill Gunther, a waterman who lives near the proposed development.
NEWS
January 28, 1994
Carroll County's Environmental Affairs Advisory Board will assess the environmental impact of a developer's request to increase housing density on a 205-acre farm near Eldersburg.The board reviewed Carroll Development Associates' rezoning request for the Belt Farm east of Linton Road at a meeting Wednesday. But board members said they needed to review reports on the plan before giving an assessment to the county planning commission.The planning commission gives recommendations on rezoning requests to the county commissioners, who make the final decision.
NEWS
By Elena Conis, Special to Tribune Newspapers | May 1, 2010
Want strong bones? Eat foods high in calcium and vitamin D, get plenty of exercise and maybe steer clear of soda. In recent decades, as soda consumption has displaced consumption of other drinks — particularly milk — studies have consistently linked soda consumption with weaker bones. Now, scientists are trying to figure out how and why. One theory is that a component in cola might cause bone to deteriorate; another is that people who drink soda simply drink (and eat)
NEWS
February 24, 2010
The new state storm water regulations set to go into effect this spring, when applied to approved projects and to redevelopment properties, would have severe consequences, including a loss of density, that will cause a substantial increase to the costs and the value/economics of a project. Certain environmental interest groups are arguing that the several hundred developers who are protesting the regulations would actually save money. The fact is that the construction industry, which is in the best position to judge the impact of the new rules, clearly understands that costs will increase significantly -- in many cases to levels that will doom needed projects and the jobs they bring.
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