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Dennis Rasmussen

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SPORTS
January 10, 1991
BASEBALL (NL)Cincinnati Reds -- Signed Jeff Reed (catcher) to a two-year contract and Luis Quinones (infielder) to a one-year contract. Agreed to terms with Freddie Benevides and Brian Lane (infielders), Milt Hill (pitcher), Glenn Sutko (catcher) and Chris Jones (outfielder) on one-year contracts.San Diego Padres -- Agreed to terms with Dennis Rasmussen (pitcher) on a one-year contract.FOOTBALL (NFL) * Los Angeles Rams -- Fired Fritz Shurmur (defensive coordinator), Fred Whittingham (linebacker coach)
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BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
Moving to mesh legal and lobbying practices, the Baltimore law firm Whiteford, Taylor & Preston LLP and former Baltimore County Executive Dennis Rasmussen said yesterday that they will form a government relations joint venture.By creating the Rasmussen Whiteford Public Affairs Group LLC, the law firm and the Towson-based Rasmussen Group said they would be able to offer a broader array of services to clients of both firms."We do lobbying work, but it is a tremendously difficult task," said Albert J. Mezzanotte Jr., a member of Whiteford, Taylor's management committee.
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BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
Moving to mesh legal and lobbying practices, the Baltimore law firm Whiteford, Taylor & Preston LLP and former Baltimore County Executive Dennis Rasmussen said yesterday that they will form a government relations joint venture.By creating the Rasmussen Whiteford Public Affairs Group LLC, the law firm and the Towson-based Rasmussen Group said they would be able to offer a broader array of services to clients of both firms."We do lobbying work, but it is a tremendously difficult task," said Albert J. Mezzanotte Jr., a member of Whiteford, Taylor's management committee.
NEWS
January 13, 1994
Always examine the motives of politicians in an election year -- even self-described non-pols such as Baltimore County Executive Roger Hayden.Mr. Hayden is about to propose legislation that would reduce the official salary of the next executive from $100,700 to $75,920. His motive? He says it's to hold down the executive's salary at a time when county workers are overworked and underpaid. This is a new guise for Mr. Hayden: the county worker's pal. And just in time for his re-election bid.Proper compensation for the executive is an issue familiar to Mr. Hayden.
NEWS
January 13, 1994
Always examine the motives of politicians in an election year -- even self-described non-pols such as Baltimore County Executive Roger Hayden.Mr. Hayden is about to propose legislation that would reduce the official salary of the next executive from $100,700 to $75,920. His motive? He says it's to hold down the executive's salary at a time when county workers are overworked and underpaid. This is a new guise for Mr. Hayden: the county worker's pal. And just in time for his re-election bid.Proper compensation for the executive is an issue familiar to Mr. Hayden.
NEWS
November 7, 1990
In what surely will turn out to be a special blessing for Roger Hayden, the Baltimore County voters seemed to have vented all their frustrations over rising taxes on Dennis Rasmussen. In something of a surprise, voters decisively rejected the cap on property taxes. Had the county voted for the cap, Hayden's chances for a successful administration could have been crippled from the outset: In effect, he would have been elected to do certain things, and yet deprived of the tools necessary to carry out the task.
NEWS
November 7, 1990
In the final days of the campaign, even the Democrats were saying that maybe Dennis Rasmussen didn't have the personality to be executive. Too shy; too taken with status symbols; too thin-skinned. Partly true, partly perception. But it is not the main reason Rasmussen lost Tuesday.Rasmussen, who presided over an era of boom and growth (read: spending) in the county, was a victim of the anti-incumbency sentiment that is pervasive this year. Some of it was a result of tactical errors. The executive might have dealt with the tax revolt more constructively, taking his opposition directly to the people instead of to the Court of Appeals.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen | November 12, 1990
AS DEFEATED Baltimore County Executive Dennis F. Rasmussen reluctantly returns to private life, so can I.You see, I was the other Rasmussen in Baltimore County, the one who was always being asked, "Are you a relative of Dennis Rasmussen?" Or sometimes, "Are you his brother?"Beyond a total lack of physical resemblance, I don't wear monogrammed shirts and I drive a low-priced Ford product, not a Lincoln.However, our paths began to cross four years ago when Rasmussen ran for county executive.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | March 21, 1992
DUNEDIN, Fla. -- Jim Poole pitched one scoreless inning in his second appearance of the spring yesterday, but the results were inconclusive.When he was asked how it went, the left-hander shrugged and said, "No runs."He didn't appear to be throwing freely while warming up, and manager John Oates termed the performance "so-so." Sidelined for three weeks because of shoulder tendinitis, Poole is considerably behind the other relievers with only two weeks left in the preseason."I'm not sure if his arm is in the right position or not," said Oates.
NEWS
June 29, 1992
Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden won election in 1990 partly by campaigning against the imperial demeanor and spendthrift ways of the Democratic incumbent. The county's anti-tax protesters made Mr. Hayden their standard-bearer as they helped him unseat Dennis Rasmussen -- "Taxmussen," as they called him.In the 19 months since, Mr. Hayden has gone from darling of the anti-taxers to sworn enemy. When the executive's economic development director was found earlier this year to have hosted Falstaffian business meals, the protesters pitched a fit. Later, when Mr. Hayden did the responsible thing in raising the local income tax to help offset a state aid shortfall, anti-taxers went ballistic and redubbed their former hero "Roger Rasmussen."
NEWS
June 7, 1993
Three months ago, the transit center planned for downtown Towson looked like a done deal. Now it's a dead deal.One happy and unexpected upshot, though, is that Towson's notorious "intersection from hell" -- the convergence of York, Joppa and Dulaney Valley roads and Allegheny Avenue -- stands a good chance of being converted into a more user-friendly crossing for drivers and pedestrians alike.These are just the latest twists and turns on what has been a bumpy ride since the transit center was first proposed in the mid-1980s.
NEWS
June 29, 1992
Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden won election in 1990 partly by campaigning against the imperial demeanor and spendthrift ways of the Democratic incumbent. The county's anti-tax protesters made Mr. Hayden their standard-bearer as they helped him unseat Dennis Rasmussen -- "Taxmussen," as they called him.In the 19 months since, Mr. Hayden has gone from darling of the anti-taxers to sworn enemy. When the executive's economic development director was found earlier this year to have hosted Falstaffian business meals, the protesters pitched a fit. Later, when Mr. Hayden did the responsible thing in raising the local income tax to help offset a state aid shortfall, anti-taxers went ballistic and redubbed their former hero "Roger Rasmussen."
SPORTS
By Patti Singer Suns | May 17, 1992
ROCHESTER, N.Y. -- Richie Lewis remembers when he wore the prospect label."Four surgeries later, here I am," Lewis said.After three straight complete-game victories, one a five-hit shutout, Lewis joined the International League's leading pitchers. The Rochester Red Wings right-hander ranked 10th with a 2.48 ERA and fourth with 36 strikeouts."As long as I'm healthy, the prospect status never left," Lewis, 26, said. "If I'm able to to get out there every fifth day, my ability had been determined by the people that drafted me in '87."
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | April 5, 1992
Orioles manager John Oates apparently likes a good mystery. He kept the makeup of his starting rotation a secret all spring, which is an indication of how much the pitching staff has changed for the better.It was the first time the Orioles rotation has kept anyone in suspense since 1989.The team finally had enough pitching depth to force a few hard choices, but the air of mystery will remain until the Orioles can shake off the residue of two very discouraging seasons. The spring has been very promising, but these kinds of promises have been broken before:* Second-year starter Mike Mussina opened the spring with 10 1/3 hitless innings and was the most effective pitcher on the staff for much of the exhibition season.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | March 21, 1992
DUNEDIN, Fla. -- Jim Poole pitched one scoreless inning in his second appearance of the spring yesterday, but the results were inconclusive.When he was asked how it went, the left-hander shrugged and said, "No runs."He didn't appear to be throwing freely while warming up, and manager John Oates termed the performance "so-so." Sidelined for three weeks because of shoulder tendinitis, Poole is considerably behind the other relievers with only two weeks left in the preseason."I'm not sure if his arm is in the right position or not," said Oates.
SPORTS
January 10, 1991
BASEBALL (NL)Cincinnati Reds -- Signed Jeff Reed (catcher) to a two-year contract and Luis Quinones (infielder) to a one-year contract. Agreed to terms with Freddie Benevides and Brian Lane (infielders), Milt Hill (pitcher), Glenn Sutko (catcher) and Chris Jones (outfielder) on one-year contracts.San Diego Padres -- Agreed to terms with Dennis Rasmussen (pitcher) on a one-year contract.FOOTBALL (NFL) * Los Angeles Rams -- Fired Fritz Shurmur (defensive coordinator), Fred Whittingham (linebacker coach)
NEWS
June 7, 1993
Three months ago, the transit center planned for downtown Towson looked like a done deal. Now it's a dead deal.One happy and unexpected upshot, though, is that Towson's notorious "intersection from hell" -- the convergence of York, Joppa and Dulaney Valley roads and Allegheny Avenue -- stands a good chance of being converted into a more user-friendly crossing for drivers and pedestrians alike.These are just the latest twists and turns on what has been a bumpy ride since the transit center was first proposed in the mid-1980s.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | November 4, 1990
Baltimore County Executive Dennis F. Rasmussen has lost significant support over the past month, with an increasing number of voters now undecided, making his contest with Republican challenger Roger B. Hayden a horse race, according to The Sun Poll.Mr. Rasmussen has the support of 41 percent of the voters, a drop of 11 percentage points from a month ago. That compares to 39 percent for Mr. Hayden, up 3 percentage points over last month. About 20 percent of the voters are now undecided, compared to 12 percent in early October.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen | November 12, 1990
AS DEFEATED Baltimore County Executive Dennis F. Rasmussen reluctantly returns to private life, so can I.You see, I was the other Rasmussen in Baltimore County, the one who was always being asked, "Are you a relative of Dennis Rasmussen?" Or sometimes, "Are you his brother?"Beyond a total lack of physical resemblance, I don't wear monogrammed shirts and I drive a low-priced Ford product, not a Lincoln.However, our paths began to cross four years ago when Rasmussen ran for county executive.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | November 11, 1990
WHAT HAPPENED Tuesday defies comparison with other historic political changes in the Baltimore region. Since the advent of home-rule govern-ment in these counties, Democrats have dominated legislative and executive offices. No longer, Republicans are kings in the suburbs.This sudden reversal of fortune for a down-and-out minority party is stunning. In every Baltimore metropolitan county, Republicans rode a wave of angry discontent into office.* Anne Arundel. The GOP's best hope for governor in 1994, Robert Neall, surprised even his own followers by coming from behind to win Arundel's top post.
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