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Dennis Deconcini

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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | August 4, 1993
WASHINGTON -- "Dennis DeConcini's office, please hold. Dennis DeConcini's office, please hold."Try saying that 100 times an hour.That's the rate at which calls are pouring in for the Senate Democrat from constituents in Arizona, from lobbyists, from Republicans, from the White House.Sitting on the fence through the latest round of negotiations over the president's economic program, the three-term senator has become just about the most popular guy in town.His phone lines are in this state of gridlock from 8 in the morning till 8 at night.
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NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON and LYLE DENNISTON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Sandra Day O'Connor, a woman of global reputation and a member of America's power elite, remains mostly a stranger in her own land.The first woman justice on the Supreme Court, and now a thoroughly familiar symbol of the achieving woman, she is often the center of attention at glittering Washington social gatherings. She also is an active public speaker. And yet, she is among the capital city's most remote celebrities.The public sometimes remembers her celebrity, sometimes forgets it: She was on the Gallup Organization's "most admired women" list for the first five years she was a justice, beginning in 1981, but appeared only intermittently after that: in 1989 and 1991, and not since.
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NEWS
September 19, 1991
Events unfolding in Georgia serve as a painful but necessary reminder of the fragility of democracy in various parts of the former Soviet empire.Although Russia and Ukraine, along with Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, may have relatively good long-term prospects for building societies based on the rule of law, many other former parts of the Soviet Union are not likely to fare as well. A thinly disguised communist government is in power in Azerbaijan. Several of the Central Asian republics are democratic only in their rhetoric.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | October 4, 1994
As part of a sweeping reorganization of the U.S. Customs Service, new management centers will be established in Baltimore and 19 other cities nationwide.The agency plans to reduce its Washington headquarters staff by a third and reassign workers to the 301 ports of entry so there are more customs inspectors and import specialists where cargo is actually being handled.Eventually, 30 new customs officers will be assigned to Baltimore, where 132 customs employees currently work.The new center -- which will replace Customs' existing district office here -- is the federal government's latest acknowledgment of Baltimore's importance as a port city.
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Howard Metzenbaum (D-Ohio) used to own part of a major-league baseball franchise. He has two teams in his state. Yet for the past two years, Metzenbaum has been a staunch opponent of major-league baseball's antitrust exemption."
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | October 4, 1994
As part of a sweeping reorganization of the U.S. Customs Service, new management centers will be established in Baltimore and 19 other cities nationwide.The agency plans to reduce its Washington headquarters staff by a third and reassign workers to the 301 ports of entry so there are more customs inspectors and import specialists where cargo is actually being handled.Eventually, 30 new customs officers will be assigned to Baltimore, where 132 customs employees currently work.The new center -- which will replace Customs' existing district office here -- is the federal government's latest acknowledgment of Baltimore's importance as a port city.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Sen. John McCain, nearing the end of his ordeal as a member of the so-called "Keating Five," told the Senate ethics committee yesterday that he'd learned an important lesson from the experience. "You not only have to be careful about how and what you do," the Arizona Republican said, "but you have to be careful about what you appear to do."Because of that, Mr. McCain said, he and four other senators accused of improper conduct in the case may have committed an error of appearance.
NEWS
August 6, 1993
It was "deja vu all over again" on Capitol Hill this week. As it happened in 1978, when Jimmy Carter was desperate for one last vote to pass the Panama Canal Treaty, so it happened again in 1993 when Bill Clinton needed just one more "yea" to sustain his hopes for approval of his budget package.In both instances, the apparent winning margin was provided by Arizona Sen. Dennis DeConcini, whose chief other claim to fame is his membership in the Keating Five. These were the five senators who lobbied federal regulators on behalf of S&L fraud ++ kingpin Charles Keating.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Pounding holes in the Branch Davidian buildings was never part of the FBI's plan for ending the Waco standoff, but the strategy was altered at the scene and became "a lot scarier than intended," a Justice Department source said yesterday."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | December 5, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Although Daniel Inouye is one of the Senate's most respected members, his defense of the Keating Five is not likely to -- and should not -- prove persuasive with the Senate Ethics Committee. The Hawaii Democrat has defended embattled colleagues in the past, and he conceded he had not read the details of the case against the five senators accused of using undue influence in behalf of Charles H. Keating.But Inouye did strike at the fault line in the case against the Keating Five -- the lack of clear Senate standards that define acceptable and unacceptable conduct in objective terms.
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Howard Metzenbaum (D-Ohio) used to own part of a major-league baseball franchise. He has two teams in his state. Yet for the past two years, Metzenbaum has been a staunch opponent of major-league baseball's antitrust exemption."
NEWS
August 6, 1993
It was "deja vu all over again" on Capitol Hill this week. As it happened in 1978, when Jimmy Carter was desperate for one last vote to pass the Panama Canal Treaty, so it happened again in 1993 when Bill Clinton needed just one more "yea" to sustain his hopes for approval of his budget package.In both instances, the apparent winning margin was provided by Arizona Sen. Dennis DeConcini, whose chief other claim to fame is his membership in the Keating Five. These were the five senators who lobbied federal regulators on behalf of S&L fraud ++ kingpin Charles Keating.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | August 4, 1993
WASHINGTON -- "Dennis DeConcini's office, please hold. Dennis DeConcini's office, please hold."Try saying that 100 times an hour.That's the rate at which calls are pouring in for the Senate Democrat from constituents in Arizona, from lobbyists, from Republicans, from the White House.Sitting on the fence through the latest round of negotiations over the president's economic program, the three-term senator has become just about the most popular guy in town.His phone lines are in this state of gridlock from 8 in the morning till 8 at night.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Pounding holes in the Branch Davidian buildings was never part of the FBI's plan for ending the Waco standoff, but the strategy was altered at the scene and became "a lot scarier than intended," a Justice Department source said yesterday."
NEWS
September 19, 1991
Events unfolding in Georgia serve as a painful but necessary reminder of the fragility of democracy in various parts of the former Soviet empire.Although Russia and Ukraine, along with Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, may have relatively good long-term prospects for building societies based on the rule of law, many other former parts of the Soviet Union are not likely to fare as well. A thinly disguised communist government is in power in Azerbaijan. Several of the Central Asian republics are democratic only in their rhetoric.
NEWS
By Kate McKenna and Kate McKenna,States News Service | July 31, 1991
Bill aims to crimp political jobsWASHINGTON -- Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., teamed up this week with Sen. Paul Sarbanes, D-Md., and other senators to push legislation protecting senior federal employees threatened with reduc-tions in force (RIFs) -- especially in connection with possible political appointments.Pointing to examples of government workers laid off for budget reasons, only to later discover that their jobs had been filled by political appointees, Mikulski says her bill would prevent any such incidents.
NEWS
By Jack Germond and Jules Witcover | February 26, 1991
PhoenixIF YOU CAN call a man who spent five and a half years in a prisoner-of-war camp lucky, then John McCain, Vietnam POW turned Arizona senator, is lucky. More than a year after he was identified as one of the infamous 'Keating Five" of the S&L scandal, another war has given him a golden opportunity to salvage his political career.Ever since the gulf war began in January, McCain, a former Navy pilot, has been as much in deJackGermond &JulesWitcovermand on the news-and-analysis circuit as a retired four-star general.
NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON and LYLE DENNISTON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Sandra Day O'Connor, a woman of global reputation and a member of America's power elite, remains mostly a stranger in her own land.The first woman justice on the Supreme Court, and now a thoroughly familiar symbol of the achieving woman, she is often the center of attention at glittering Washington social gatherings. She also is an active public speaker. And yet, she is among the capital city's most remote celebrities.The public sometimes remembers her celebrity, sometimes forgets it: She was on the Gallup Organization's "most admired women" list for the first five years she was a justice, beginning in 1981, but appeared only intermittently after that: in 1989 and 1991, and not since.
NEWS
By Jack Germond and Jules Witcover | February 26, 1991
PhoenixIF YOU CAN call a man who spent five and a half years in a prisoner-of-war camp lucky, then John McCain, Vietnam POW turned Arizona senator, is lucky. More than a year after he was identified as one of the infamous 'Keating Five" of the S&L scandal, another war has given him a golden opportunity to salvage his political career.Ever since the gulf war began in January, McCain, a former Navy pilot, has been as much in deJackGermond &JulesWitcovermand on the news-and-analysis circuit as a retired four-star general.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Sen. John McCain, nearing the end of his ordeal as a member of the so-called "Keating Five," told the Senate ethics committee yesterday that he'd learned an important lesson from the experience. "You not only have to be careful about how and what you do," the Arizona Republican said, "but you have to be careful about what you appear to do."Because of that, Mr. McCain said, he and four other senators accused of improper conduct in the case may have committed an error of appearance.
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