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By IAN JOHNSON | March 26, 1995
Beijing -- When asked 10 years ago what he thought the biggest story in China was, the Toronto Globe and Mail's Allen Abel gave a prophetic reply: "Deng's death. That's the big event that everyone's waiting for."Unless it happened by the time you read this article, senior leader Deng Xiaoping is still kicking. The difference between 1985 and 1995 is that the media have now become so impatient that it almost seems as if they're urging the old man to give up the ghost.At least that's the conclusion that one might draw after watching the media's interest in Mr. Deng's health over the past few months.
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NEWS
By Alison J. Dray-Novey | June 4, 2009
Demonstrations at Tiananmen 20 years ago grew out of a paradox that had been building in China since 1978, all through the era of rapid economic reform. To achieve its aims, the Chinese Communist Party wished to liberate people economically while continuing to constrain them politically. A version of this same tension persists today. Following the disastrous Cultural Revolution (1965-1970s), the party no longer could base its legitimacy on Maoist socialism. Marxist-Leninist ideology was virtually dead.
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NEWS
February 20, 1997
HE LIBERATED China from the communes, the horrors of the great famine of the 1950s, the folly of the Great Leap Forward and the terrors of the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s-70s. He brought back the profit motive, supply and demand, individual initiative, the stock market, the private farmer, the private company. He unleashed the massive potential of China to produce the greatest economic growth of any country at any time. He was the antidote to the madness of Mao Tse-tung. For all this, Deng Xiaoping will be gratefully remembered as long as there is a China.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 26, 2006
MOSCOW -- Russian President Vladimir V. Putin reaffirmed yesterday his intent to leave the presidency in 2008 at the end of his second term as required by Russia's Constitution, but suggested that he might continue to wield influence. Putin's comment was taken by some as an indication that he might seek to exercise power from another position, such as prime minister, or that he envisions a role for himself such as that played by Deng Xiaoping after the Chinese leader retired from his official positions.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration expects so few repercussions in China's leadership resulting from Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping's death yesterday that it moved ahead with plans for Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright to visit China early next week."
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 20, 1992
They ought to hold the election every year so we could have these debates more often.Deng Xiaoping at 88 decided the other guys are too old.If Toronto wins the Series, the Canadian constitution wins the Oct. 26 referendum, and if not, not.The stock market crashed five years ago but the sky did not fall. This year, vice versa.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 22, 1992
Caution: The polls that say George is losing are the ones that a year ago said he was invincible.Just because 5 million Americans asked Ross to run does not mean they will vote for him.Transportation authorities are testing a Swiss-Swedish fast train on Baltimore tracks and plan to make it available to MARC in the year 2092.China finally has a regime in place that will last as long as Deng Xiaoping, 88 and feeble, shall live.
NEWS
February 19, 1997
THE WORLD watches the deathbed -- if such it is -- of a 92-year-old man who has held no office since 1990 and not been seen in public for three years. China's President Jiang Zemin and Premier Li Peng rushed back to Beijing. Word went out unofficially -- officially denied -- that Deng Xiaoping, the Great Architect, was failing. A Hong Kong newspaper said he had a massive stroke.Perhaps he did. Stocks dipped on the Hong Kong stock exchange and plummeted on two little stock exchanges inside China.
NEWS
September 21, 1997
DEMANDING CONTRADICTIONS, the 15th Communist Party Congress of China is enshrining Deng Xiaoping Theory along with Mao Zedong Thought. Economic ownership must represent diverse interests; political control and expression must be monolithic. As though the two had nothing to do with each other.Party boss Jiang Zemin, the late Deng Xiaoping's last protege, decreed a breathtaking clean-out of China's creaking state industries, which drag down growth and production while keeping the populace ostensibly employed.
NEWS
December 27, 1994
How does a frail 90-year-old with no official title cling to all-embracing political power? One way, as detailed by Ian Johnson, The Sun's Beijing correspondent, is to enforceretirement at 70 in the private sector. Especially in the unauthorized religious sector.The incident of goons rising in the capital city's largest Protestant church during service in front of a full congregation and unceremoniously dumping the pastor outside, because of the Rev. Yang Yudong's 73 years, is simply part of a larger campaign against Christian, Muslim, Taoist and Buddhist worship that is flourishing outside the state-created "patriotic" churches.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 21, 2004
BEIJING - Behind the choreographed withdrawal of Jiang Zemin from China's central leadership Sunday was the government's attempt to display a maturing Communist Party completing its first orderly transfer of power. By voluntarily handing control of the military, to President Hu Jintao, Jiang may have signaled the end of an era. But the behind-the-scenes maneuvering that preceded Jiang's departure from his last major post illustrated something much different: a political system still trapped in the opaque, Kremlin-style intriguing of a bygone era. The Communist Party of China is building a bureaucracy to run the country and writing rules by which to govern it, but all the key decisions continue to be made behind an impenetrable shroud.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | December 26, 2001
MOSCOW -- Because of Moscow's exploding middle class, you quickly notice two things driving around this increasingly European city -- sushi bars are opening all over (yes, from borscht to Big Macs to California-Kremlin rolls in one decade!) and so many people have cars that traffic is permanently snarled (imagine Jakarta with snow and ice and you've got today's Moscow). So sitting in gridlock the other day in Pushkin Square, I had plenty of time to ask my Russian friend Viktor a cosmic question: Is your life easier or harder now than it was under communism?
NEWS
January 14, 2001
PAPERS COPIED by a disaffected civil servant and smuggled to the United States for translation and publication by academics should be the least of the Chinese government's worries. It is the unchallenged and unaccountable ruler of 1.2 billion souls, with nuclear weapons, a monopoly on political power and the world's most dynamic economic growth. The energies of the most capable millions of its population are devoted to the creation of wealth for private consumption and not to introspection or history.
NEWS
September 21, 1997
DEMANDING CONTRADICTIONS, the 15th Communist Party Congress of China is enshrining Deng Xiaoping Theory along with Mao Zedong Thought. Economic ownership must represent diverse interests; political control and expression must be monolithic. As though the two had nothing to do with each other.Party boss Jiang Zemin, the late Deng Xiaoping's last protege, decreed a breathtaking clean-out of China's creaking state industries, which drag down growth and production while keeping the populace ostensibly employed.
NEWS
March 2, 1997
THE MANDATE OF HEAVEN determines who reigns in China. The Communists won that mandate in 1949, regimenting the empire. Whether they will last, like Han and Ming dynasties, must be doubted. More likely, the Communists will depart leaving permanent works, like the Qin dynasty of the third century B.C., whose military, economic and bureaucratic achievements are on view at "The First Emperor" show at the Walters Art Gallery starting today.China, its great literary and religious age over, was small warring states.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 1997
BEIJING -- On the seventh day after he took up the title of commander in chief of China's armed forces in November 1989, President Jiang Zemin went to the far western province of Xinjiang to inspect a frigid frontier post. There he demanded to know why the soldiers were sleeping with only one blanket. "Aren't they cold at night?" he said.There in the barracks, like George Washington looking after the men of Valley Forge, he admonished the officers, "Our cadres must care for each and every soldier and be concerned with their livelihood."
NEWS
April 6, 1992
It is no surprise that the neo-Maoist regime of Deng Xiaoping is going ahead, do-it-now style, on the world's biggest hydro-electric project. The 600-foot dam on China's unruly Yangtze River will produce untold millions of kilowatts of electric power and change forever the majestic Three Gorges.It is no surprise that the decades-long argument for taming the Yangtze floods, harnessing its power and making its upper reaches navigable won out over fears of lost wildlife and farmland and geological instability.
NEWS
January 14, 2001
PAPERS COPIED by a disaffected civil servant and smuggled to the United States for translation and publication by academics should be the least of the Chinese government's worries. It is the unchallenged and unaccountable ruler of 1.2 billion souls, with nuclear weapons, a monopoly on political power and the world's most dynamic economic growth. The energies of the most capable millions of its population are devoted to the creation of wealth for private consumption and not to introspection or history.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration expects so few repercussions in China's leadership resulting from Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping's death yesterday that it moved ahead with plans for Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright to visit China early next week."
NEWS
February 20, 1997
HE LIBERATED China from the communes, the horrors of the great famine of the 1950s, the folly of the Great Leap Forward and the terrors of the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s-70s. He brought back the profit motive, supply and demand, individual initiative, the stock market, the private farmer, the private company. He unleashed the massive potential of China to produce the greatest economic growth of any country at any time. He was the antidote to the madness of Mao Tse-tung. For all this, Deng Xiaoping will be gratefully remembered as long as there is a China.
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