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By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | October 13, 1992
BEIJING -- Chinese patriarch Deng Xiaoping dominated the opening of the Chinese Communist Party's national congress yesterday as an unseen deity urgently trying to script socialism's salvation here.China's senior leader since the late 1970s, Mr. Deng, 88, now holds no party or government post. Ailments have rendered him increasingly feeble. He did not appear at the congress' first session.But party chief Jiang Zemin's two-hour report to the congress yesterday echoed internal party documents circulated this year under Mr. Deng's name.
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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | December 5, 2010
The public library in Pingwen, a rural village in southern China, is also a Communist pantheon. Images of Marx, Engels, Lenin, Stalin, Mao and Deng look out from a plaster wall at shelves of multicolored agriculture literature. But that socialist sextet wouldn't recognize what's going on outside. Instead of working for the Communist state, the village's 643 families control their own land, choose which crops to grow and earn profits from their toil. Sometimes they lease hectares to private corporations.
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NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Ian Johnson and Robert Benjamin and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 20, 1997
BEIJING -- Deng Xiaoping, who dramatically transformed China while brutally maintaining Communist political supremacy, died yesterday. He was 92.The death of the resilient former guerrilla fighter -- twice purged from power before becoming paramount leader of the world's most populous nation in 1978 -- was announced by Xinhua, China's state news agency.Xinhua said Deng died of complications from Parkinson's disease and a lung infection. He had been hospitalized since last week and had been sick for years.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 26, 2006
MOSCOW -- Russian President Vladimir V. Putin reaffirmed yesterday his intent to leave the presidency in 2008 at the end of his second term as required by Russia's Constitution, but suggested that he might continue to wield influence. Putin's comment was taken by some as an indication that he might seek to exercise power from another position, such as prime minister, or that he envisions a role for himself such as that played by Deng Xiaoping after the Chinese leader retired from his official positions.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | April 1, 1992
BEIJING -- Chinese television viewers were treated to an extraordinary show last night that virtually amounted to a Western-style political ad for senior leader Deng Xiaoping and his drive for greater economic reforms.The 45-minute special, announced only a half-hour before it was aired, focused on Mr. Deng during his January trip to southern China's freewheeling Guangdong province, which claims the fastest growing economy in the world.The 87-year-old leader publicly kicked off his drive for economic liberalization during that journey two months ago, but the first reports about it in China's national newspapers did not appear until this week.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | March 13, 1992
BEIJING -- China's top leader Deng Xiaoping, 87 and said to be in ill health, has mustered enough political support to triumph for now over hard-line socialists in his renewed bid to accelerate China's economic reforms by any means.The significant victory in Mr. Deng's power struggle with more doctrinaire Chinese leaders was evident in a rare public statement here yesterday by China's Communist Party.The strong message from the party's ruling Politburo -- bannered in every state newspaper and on government television -- endorsed aggressive liberalization of China's economy, while diminishing the role of socialist ideology.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | April 3, 1992
BEIJING -- Chinese Premier Li Peng, widely reviled here and abroad for his role in the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, has confounded his many critics by not only keeping his job since then but appearing to thrive in it.Today, however, Mr. Li is expected to suffer an embarrassing political setback that may leave him significantly weakened as he enters the last year of his five-year term in office.The setback involves a political code phrase -- a call to fight "leftism" -- which the premier has been forced to include in the final version of his annual report to China's legislature, according to Chinese and Western sources.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | March 13, 1992
BEIJING -- China's top leader Deng Xiaoping, 87 and said to be in ill health, has mustered enough political support to triumph for now over hard-line socialists in his renewed bid to accelerate China's economic reforms by any means.The significant victory in Mr. Deng's power struggle with more doctrinaire Chinese leaders was evident in a rare public statement here yesterday by China's Communist Party.The strong message from the party's ruling Politburo -- bannered in every state newspaper and on government television -- endorsed aggressive liberalization of China's economy, while diminishing the role of socialist ideology.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2004
SAN ANTONIO - Their connections can be found on family trees and high school rosters. In one case, they have the same 94-year-old great-grandfather and in another shared the same prep school dorm room. This year's NCAA Final Four is being played here at the Alamodome, but it could have easily been held in another part of the state, possibly at Reunion Arena in Dallas or the playgrounds of Houston. When Georgia Tech (27-9) and Oklahoma State (31-3) meet in the first semifinal tonight, and Duke (31-5)
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | April 12, 1995
BEIJING -- The death of Chen Yun, China's reclusive opponent of free market capitalism, robs orthodox Communists of their best opportunity to roll back the country's recent economic reforms.His death also puts an end to the worst fear of China's reformers: that ailing leader Deng Xiaoping would die before Mr. Chen, allowing conservatives to rally around the survivor and reverse China's recent economic reforms."With Chen dead, there's no one else of his stature to lead a campaign against the reforms," said a Western diplomat in Beijing.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2004
SAN ANTONIO - Their connections can be found on family trees and high school rosters. In one case, they have the same 94-year-old great-grandfather and in another shared the same prep school dorm room. This year's NCAA Final Four is being played here at the Alamodome, but it could have easily been held in another part of the state, possibly at Reunion Arena in Dallas or the playgrounds of Houston. When Georgia Tech (27-9) and Oklahoma State (31-3) meet in the first semifinal tonight, and Duke (31-5)
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2004
DURHAM, N.C. - He was barely in his teens when Luol Deng first started to learn what basketball in the United States was all about. Living in London after his family was forced to leave its native Sudan amid the tragedy and tumult that enveloped the African country, Deng watched the sport from a distance. The first player Deng paid attention to was Grant Hill. Deng was too young to have seen Hill play for Duke on its back-to-back national championship teams in 1991 and 1992, but he devoured tapes of Hill's exploits with the Detroit Pistons.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 15, 2003
KAI COUNTY, China - Seven weeks before her death, 15-year-old Deng Xiaofang sat on a small stool by her hospital bed and carefully wrote down what had happened to her, the story that family members say police had warned her not to tell and newspapers would later be ordered not to report. Deng was a dropout from a middle school in a mountain village. Her grammar was flawed, her vocabulary limited and heavy with local slang. But in neat handwriting in blue ink on nine lined pages of letter-size paper, the adopted daughter of farmers scrawled an account of her rape and the police's efforts to cover it up. Her new employers at a restaurant had put her in the hands of a stranger, she wrote, who sexually assaulted her, tried to pay her $6 and then left.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2003
Yao Qiang Deng barely glanced at the two defendants, the men twice his size responsible for his months of nightmares. Instead, he focused on the Mandarin interpreter and spoke in his native language about the impact of a robbery prosecutors describe as one of the county's cruelest. "I have difficulties sleeping," the court interpreter translated for Deng. "I have lost wages." Eight months ago, Deng, a chef at the Yao Han Chinese restaurant on Liberty Road who was working to bring his family to the United States from China, was tortured in his bedroom above the restaurant and robbed of his wallet, automated teller machine card and watch.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 14, 2003
GUANGZHOU, China - Deng Deliu couldn't believe it when the government came for his pheasants. It had been a lazy morning at the animal markets, with only a few shoppers perusing the snakes, turtles, rabbits, cats, dogs, badgers, ducks, geese, frogs, pigeons and hedgehogs crammed into cages. For lack of buyers, kept away by fear of SARS, the sellers played cards and mah-jongg and watched Chinese soap operas on television as the animals squirmed, clawed and quacked. Deng was trying to sell his prized ring-necked rooster pheasants, striking for their multihued coats, for $4 a head.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 21, 2002
BEIJING - In his secret acceptance speech after being appointed China's Communist Party chief on Friday, Hu Jintao pledged that on important matters he would "seek instruction and listen to the views" of his predecessor, Jiang Zemin, according to two party officials who attended briefings on the meeting. The words Hu used were stronger than customary farewells to retiring leaders, the officials said, and amounted to a promise of deference, declared before the new senior leadership. Hu's speech, to a closed caucus of party leaders Friday morning, has not been released to the public.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2003
Yao Qiang Deng barely glanced at the two defendants, the men twice his size responsible for his months of nightmares. Instead, he focused on the Mandarin interpreter and spoke in his native language about the impact of a robbery prosecutors describe as one of the county's cruelest. "I have difficulties sleeping," the court interpreter translated for Deng. "I have lost wages." Eight months ago, Deng, a chef at the Yao Han Chinese restaurant on Liberty Road who was working to bring his family to the United States from China, was tortured in his bedroom above the restaurant and robbed of his wallet, automated teller machine card and watch.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | October 12, 1992
BEIJING -- The Chinese Communist Party's national congress, which opens here today, will put out to pasture many of China's old-guard, conservative revolutionaries by abolishing a key advisory body for retired leaders.During its six-day meeting, the congress will change the party's charter in order to eliminate its Central Advisory Commission, a congress spokesman, Liu Chongde, announced yesterday.The commission -- composed of about 200 members, many well into their 80s -- was created 10 years ago by Chinese patriarch Deng Xiaoping as a way to gracefully move many other elderly party leaders out of the political limelight.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 1997
BEIJING -- On the seventh day after he took up the title of commander in chief of China's armed forces in November 1989, President Jiang Zemin went to the far western province of Xinjiang to inspect a frigid frontier post. There he demanded to know why the soldiers were sleeping with only one blanket. "Aren't they cold at night?" he said.There in the barracks, like George Washington looking after the men of Valley Forge, he admonished the officers, "Our cadres must care for each and every soldier and be concerned with their livelihood."
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | February 21, 1997
TOKYO -- The Chinese empire is so vast, so populous, and the inner workings of its power elite so enigmatic, that consolidating and holding power has never been a simple task. Now, that chore falls to President Jiang Zemin, who must hold on to the reins of power he has inherited from Deng Xiaoping.To accomplish this, Jiang must wrestle with powerful forces inside and outside China -- from internal challenges such as rapid economic growth, mass migration, increasing corruption and a widening gap between rich and poor, to such external threats as Taiwan and the jarring onslaught of Western consumer culture.
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