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By Vicki Hengen and Vicki Hengen,BOSTON GLOBE | October 22, 1995
Just having celebrated its 10th anniversary, Elle has risen, head and powdered shoulders, above the fashion pack. These days it offers intelligent profiles and arts reviews, sleek design and typography, and a genuinely funny advice column -- to say nothing of fashion spreads full of clothes that women might actually wear.Thus, hopes were high when the November issue plugged a Q &A with Catherine Deneuve -- a thinking woman's movie star and the face that launched a million bottles of Chanel.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 12, 2008
At last, a great contemporary holiday movie that's strictly for grown-ups - a holiday movie that really is a moviegoer's holiday from desultory daily fare. Arnaud Desplechin's A Christmas Tale maintains a humorous sangfroid about matters of life and death, then explodes into epiphanies. Catherine Deneuve has never been more magnificent - or should we say magnifique? - as Junon, a matriarch who approaches terminal illness and family upheaval with breathtaking directness. The zesty-if-sad-eyed Jean-Paul Rousillon plays Abel, her sane, salt-of-the-earth husband.
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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1996
Compelling and thoughtful, "Ma Saison Preferee" ("My Favorite Season"), which opens today at the Charles, reaches beneath the cool exteriors of a prickly family to reveal the passions and memories that seethe within.Catherine Deneuve and Daniel Auteuil are engrossing as an estranged brother and sister who are brought together by their mother's failing health.Mom (Marthe Villalonga) wants her grown-up children to face her inevitable death, but once the siblings are together, they have trouble extracting themselves from the past long enough to face the future.
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By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2005
I'd just finished lunch at a dockside cafe in Vietnam's Mekong Delta, south of Saigon, where nothing on the menu - grilled fish, crispy spring rolls or litchi nuts for dessert - prepared me for a startling suggestion of an after-dinner drink. Would I care for some snake liqueur? The smiling waitress, undeterred by what must have been my look of dismay, brought forth a glass jug of rice wine, at the bottom of which was coiled a dead cobra. Hmmm. Was I a man or a mouse? When she assured me this elixir strengthens one's vitality, I meekly sipped a liquid that was viscous, peppery and almost disappointingly sweet.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 11, 2002
After bringing a performance out of Charlotte Rampling in Under the Sand that even she might not have realized she had in her, the French writer-director Francoise Ozon has taken a handful of his country's biggest female stars and stuffed them into a candy box. 8 Women is meant to be a sampler with the likes of Deneuve, Darrieux, Huppert, Ardant and Beart as its treats. But the confectioner has arrived at pretty poison. Oh, if you've seen Cukor's The Women umpteen times and adore the most chi-chi soap operas and musicals of the 1940s and 1950s, 8 Women might be just the right cup of cafe au lait.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 12, 1997
Funny that the Charles Theatre should bring back "Repulsion" at a time when so many purportedly shocking and terrifying movies are on the screens.Next to Polanski's 1965 film, "Scream 2" is a Thursday night sit-com; "Alien Resurrection" is a dance around the Maypole; "Sick," also opening at the Charles, is a mere bagatelle.With a modicum of blood and nary a vulgarity within earshot, "Repulsion," which stars Catherine Deneuve as a manicurist living in London, epitomizes terror at its chilling, deeply psychological best.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 10, 2004
In 1965, Repulsion (playing tomorrow at noon and Thursday at 9 p.m. at the Charles) was greeted as Roman Polanski's riposte to Hitchcock's Psycho -- a brilliant, grisly potboiler that gave the 32-year-old Polish filmmaker commercial entree to the West. Four decades later, it's evident that Polanski was always drawn to existential horror and that his lucid moviemaking owes as much to Hollywood's master writer-directors as to visual maestros like Hitchcock. After Repulsion premiered, Polanski told Cahiers du Cinema, "I like to shut myself up. I remember: when I was twelve, fourteen, I liked atmospheres that came from ... what do I know?
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 23, 1996
Jacques Demy's "The Umbrellas of Cherbourg" (1964), a beautiful restoration of which opens today at the Charles, is undoubtedly a classic, but whether it's a classic of classicism or a classic of kitsch is still open to debate.This is one of the great gimmick movies of all time, comparable in its dead-on zaniness to the all-midget western "The Terror of Tiny Town" or the all-kid gangster movie "Bugsy Malone."This is an all-singing non-musical. But they don't exactly sing songs. In fact, the movie has no songs.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 12, 2008
At last, a great contemporary holiday movie that's strictly for grown-ups - a holiday movie that really is a moviegoer's holiday from desultory daily fare. Arnaud Desplechin's A Christmas Tale maintains a humorous sangfroid about matters of life and death, then explodes into epiphanies. Catherine Deneuve has never been more magnificent - or should we say magnifique? - as Junon, a matriarch who approaches terminal illness and family upheaval with breathtaking directness. The zesty-if-sad-eyed Jean-Paul Rousillon plays Abel, her sane, salt-of-the-earth husband.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 6, 2000
Selma Jezkova has by no measure a happy life: She's almost blind, she works endless hours at a mind-numbing job, she can barely provide for her young son, and she's cast as Maria in an amateur production of "The Sound of Music." Actually, that acting stint is the only thing that gives her pleasure (which emphasizes how empty her life really is). But even the prospect of making like Julie Andrews isn't the comfort it ought to be: Her eyesight is so bad, she's probably going to have to pull out of the production.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 10, 2004
In 1965, Repulsion (playing tomorrow at noon and Thursday at 9 p.m. at the Charles) was greeted as Roman Polanski's riposte to Hitchcock's Psycho -- a brilliant, grisly potboiler that gave the 32-year-old Polish filmmaker commercial entree to the West. Four decades later, it's evident that Polanski was always drawn to existential horror and that his lucid moviemaking owes as much to Hollywood's master writer-directors as to visual maestros like Hitchcock. After Repulsion premiered, Polanski told Cahiers du Cinema, "I like to shut myself up. I remember: when I was twelve, fourteen, I liked atmospheres that came from ... what do I know?
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 11, 2002
After bringing a performance out of Charlotte Rampling in Under the Sand that even she might not have realized she had in her, the French writer-director Francoise Ozon has taken a handful of his country's biggest female stars and stuffed them into a candy box. 8 Women is meant to be a sampler with the likes of Deneuve, Darrieux, Huppert, Ardant and Beart as its treats. But the confectioner has arrived at pretty poison. Oh, if you've seen Cukor's The Women umpteen times and adore the most chi-chi soap operas and musicals of the 1940s and 1950s, 8 Women might be just the right cup of cafe au lait.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 6, 2000
Selma Jezkova has by no measure a happy life: She's almost blind, she works endless hours at a mind-numbing job, she can barely provide for her young son, and she's cast as Maria in an amateur production of "The Sound of Music." Actually, that acting stint is the only thing that gives her pleasure (which emphasizes how empty her life really is). But even the prospect of making like Julie Andrews isn't the comfort it ought to be: Her eyesight is so bad, she's probably going to have to pull out of the production.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 12, 1997
Funny that the Charles Theatre should bring back "Repulsion" at a time when so many purportedly shocking and terrifying movies are on the screens.Next to Polanski's 1965 film, "Scream 2" is a Thursday night sit-com; "Alien Resurrection" is a dance around the Maypole; "Sick," also opening at the Charles, is a mere bagatelle.With a modicum of blood and nary a vulgarity within earshot, "Repulsion," which stars Catherine Deneuve as a manicurist living in London, epitomizes terror at its chilling, deeply psychological best.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 23, 1996
Jacques Demy's "The Umbrellas of Cherbourg" (1964), a beautiful restoration of which opens today at the Charles, is undoubtedly a classic, but whether it's a classic of classicism or a classic of kitsch is still open to debate.This is one of the great gimmick movies of all time, comparable in its dead-on zaniness to the all-midget western "The Terror of Tiny Town" or the all-kid gangster movie "Bugsy Malone."This is an all-singing non-musical. But they don't exactly sing songs. In fact, the movie has no songs.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1996
Compelling and thoughtful, "Ma Saison Preferee" ("My Favorite Season"), which opens today at the Charles, reaches beneath the cool exteriors of a prickly family to reveal the passions and memories that seethe within.Catherine Deneuve and Daniel Auteuil are engrossing as an estranged brother and sister who are brought together by their mother's failing health.Mom (Marthe Villalonga) wants her grown-up children to face her inevitable death, but once the siblings are together, they have trouble extracting themselves from the past long enough to face the future.
FEATURES
By Genevieve Buck and Genevieve Buck,Chicago Tribune | July 9, 1992
"For the first time in my life, people are saying I'm doing something good in my ads," says Calvin Klein, long known for his controversial advertising. "Before this happened, people were always screaming about them, talking about how they upset people. Now they're saying my ads are making them happy."The ads that Mr. Klein and others are chatting up these days are not his usual brand of intertwined bodies and near-naked men in showers or double entendre jeans commercials dating to the early Brooke Shields days.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | March 21, 1991
When Nigel Kennedy walks out on Meyerhoff Hall stage to play Bruch's G Minor Violin Concerto with the Baltimore Symphony tonight, he may become the first fiddle player in BSO history to play in blue suede shoes, baggy pants, a purple vest, a sequined jacket and spiked hair."
FEATURES
By Vicki Hengen and Vicki Hengen,BOSTON GLOBE | October 22, 1995
Just having celebrated its 10th anniversary, Elle has risen, head and powdered shoulders, above the fashion pack. These days it offers intelligent profiles and arts reviews, sleek design and typography, and a genuinely funny advice column -- to say nothing of fashion spreads full of clothes that women might actually wear.Thus, hopes were high when the November issue plugged a Q &A with Catherine Deneuve -- a thinking woman's movie star and the face that launched a million bottles of Chanel.
FEATURES
By Genevieve Buck and Genevieve Buck,Chicago Tribune | July 9, 1992
"For the first time in my life, people are saying I'm doing something good in my ads," says Calvin Klein, long known for his controversial advertising. "Before this happened, people were always screaming about them, talking about how they upset people. Now they're saying my ads are making them happy."The ads that Mr. Klein and others are chatting up these days are not his usual brand of intertwined bodies and near-naked men in showers or double entendre jeans commercials dating to the early Brooke Shields days.
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