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Demolition Permit

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NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun Reporter | January 25, 2007
Encouraged by recent negotiations, Baltimore preservationists have agreed to postpone a challenge of Mercy Medical Center's permit to demolish a row of historic downtown rowhomes. Baltimore Heritage, after meeting with hospital representatives this week, decided yesterday to postpone a hearing set for Tuesday asking the city to reconsider Mercy's demolition permit. The hearing has been rescheduled for Feb. 6. "These meetings have been helpful," Mercy's attorney, David W. Kinkopf, wrote in a joint statement with Baltimore Heritage's attorney, John Denick.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 4, 2014
Work has begun on the major mixed-use development downtown that is to replace the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre with two glassy apartment towers and four floors of shopping, said a spokesman for Owings Mills developer David S. Brown Enterprises LTD . The garage beneath the theater closed this month and a construction fence now surrounds the property, located at the intersection of Charles and Baltimore streets. Formal demolition could start "any day," said Larry Lichtenauer of Lawrence Howard & Associates.
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NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Staff writer | September 8, 1991
The "Old Stone House" has stood on Liberty Street for more than 100 years, but its future likely will be decided much more quickly.The fate of the building, owned by Farmer's Supply Co., will be considered tomorrow when the City Council conducts a public hearing on an application for a demolition permit.The hearing is part of the council meeting, set for 7:30 p.m. at the Westminster Volunteer Fire Co.The debate over the building, which dates to 1875, pits progress against the past.While city administrators say they don't want to see the vacant building razed, theowners say they cannot properly market the property without having permission to level the structure.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
Baltimore's historical preservation commission on Tuesday officially disapproved of demolishing the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre. The vote by the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation, or CHAP, means the city's Department of Housing and Community Development, which issues demolition permits, will not be able to proceed for at least six months. Owings Mills-based developer David S. Brown Enterprises Ltd. and the Washington architecture firm Shalom Baranes Associates released plans in the spring that called for the demolition of the Mechanic and the construction of two residential towers in its place.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN REPORTER | December 9, 2006
Baltimore granted Mercy Medical Center a demolition permit yesterday to tear down a row of historic downtown houses for its $292 million expansion, but within hours preservationists had mounted a challenge based on open-government violations.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | August 3, 2006
Opponents of the plan to demolish the 100-year-old Rochambeau scrambled yesterday to stop the Archdiocese of Baltimore from razing the building this weekend. Church officials agreed to postpone taking down the Mount Vernon-area apartment building until after a hearing Monday during which city officials will reconsider the demolition permit. "We are naturally pleased," said George W. Liebmann, the attorney representing the demolition opponents. Liebmann had arranged for a city Circuit Court hearing this morning to try to get a restraining order preventing demolition this weekend, then canceled it after hearing from church officials late yesterday.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1998
Amid growing criticism, Baltimore County officials ordered yesterday stricter reviews of demolition permit requests and weighed potential penalties against developers who razed a historic house in the Greenspring Valley.Two top supervisors in the county's permit office will be required to review all demolition permits to check that no historic properties are affected, county building engineer John R. Reisinger said yesterday. He would not comment on potential fines for the developers.His order came three days after the 19th-century Maryvale Tenant House on Greenspring Valley Road was razed -- and Reisinger acknowledged that the county mistakenly issued a demolition permit.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun Reporter | December 7, 2006
Mercy Medical Center will likely have a permit to demolish a row of historic downtown houses before preservationists get a shot at saving them next week. City officials said yesterday that Mercy's demolition application is moving quickly, and the hospital could have a permit in hand by the end of the week. If so, that could render irrelevant an effort to give landmark status to the buildings and quash any chance for public debate on the matter. The move comes weeks after the passage of a bill, quietly amended by City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. at Mercy's request, to strip all historic protections from the buildings, enabling the hospital to begin its $292 million expansion without having to bother with a one-year demolition deliberation process.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 4, 2014
Work has begun on the major mixed-use development downtown that is to replace the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre with two glassy apartment towers and four floors of shopping, said a spokesman for Owings Mills developer David S. Brown Enterprises LTD . The garage beneath the theater closed this month and a construction fence now surrounds the property, located at the intersection of Charles and Baltimore streets. Formal demolition could start "any day," said Larry Lichtenauer of Lawrence Howard & Associates.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | October 28, 1992
An Annapolis businessman has launched a last-ditch effort to save the Terminal Warehouse in Fells Point -- or what's left of it.Three weeks after Baltimore's housing commissioner issued a demolition permit for the warehouse at 1601 Thames St., preservationist Paul Pearson has called for demolition to halt so that he can convert the building to an $18 million hotel and conference center.Mr. Pearson, who converted five rundown hotels in the state capital to the Historic Inns of Annapolis, said he has a financial partner who is willing to buy the warehouse for $2 million from its owner, Constellation Real Estate Inc.Last week Mr. Pearson asked Constellation to stop demolition and consider his plan to turn the six-story building into a 175-suite hotel with a 700-seat banquet hall.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2011
Residents of the Eastern Shore community of Still Pond have taken the first step toward establishing a nonprofit organization in hopes of saving a historic market and post office that was heavily damaged by fire last fall. The Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation approved the paperwork on Friday creating Still Pond Preservation Inc., allowing the group to bid for the 19th-century building that stands in a National Historic District in Kent County. The historic designation established in 2009 does not protect the building from destruction, and the owners have a demolition permit that they can use starting on Monday.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | January 9, 2008
Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation voted yesterday to delay a decision on whether to designate Calvert School's Castalia property a local landmark after the school asked for more time to learn how the designation would affect its plans for expansion. School leaders agreed not to seek a demolition permit or make changes to the exterior of the former headmaster's residence until a March 11 hearing. A local preservation group known as Baltimore Heritage nominated Castalia for landmark listing last fall after the private school sought permission to tear down the house, possibly to make way for an amphitheater.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun Reporter | January 25, 2007
Encouraged by recent negotiations, Baltimore preservationists have agreed to postpone a challenge of Mercy Medical Center's permit to demolish a row of historic downtown rowhomes. Baltimore Heritage, after meeting with hospital representatives this week, decided yesterday to postpone a hearing set for Tuesday asking the city to reconsider Mercy's demolition permit. The hearing has been rescheduled for Feb. 6. "These meetings have been helpful," Mercy's attorney, David W. Kinkopf, wrote in a joint statement with Baltimore Heritage's attorney, John Denick.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN REPORTER | January 5, 2007
Hoping to make peace with Baltimore's preservationists, Mercy Medical Center has offered to spend $400,000 to spare one of a row of historic downtown houses and rebuild it in a city museum. Those fighting the downtown hospital's attempt to demolish the 1820s-era houses on St. Paul Place for a $292 million expansion call Mercy's gesture unacceptable and vow that they will pursue their goal of getting the hospital's demolition permit revoked. Top Mercy officials, searching for a compromise to ward off what could be a drawn-out battle with preservationists, said yesterday that they are willing to save the facade of one of the houses and would dedicate space in their new inpatient tower to an exhibit on the site's rich African-American history.
NEWS
December 29, 2006
The rush to landmark a group of 1820s rowhomes to save them from demolition falls under the heading of "better late than never." But the last-minute city effort underscores the need for Baltimore preservationists to take the initiative in protecting the city's architectural heritage. The list of significant buildings that lack local landmark status may surprise you: the Hippodrome Theater, Camden Station and the Woman's Industrial Exchange, to name a few. Their prominence protects them, but there are other lesser-known buildings whose futures may be far less certain.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | December 13, 2006
Baltimore's preservation board unanimously approved measures yesterday that wrap a row of historic downtown rowhouses with protections against demolition - effectively defying city officials who just days ago granted Mercy Medical Center a permit to raze the properties. In an emotional two-hour hearing, the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation heard how the block of red-brick houses, built nearly 200 years ago on what is now the 300 block of St. Paul Place, should be spared not just because of their age but because of their rich role in Baltimore's African-American history.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1999
Baltimore County Historical Trust officials called on the County Council yesterday to strengthen what they see as weak laws and penalties protecting historical structures, after the demolition of a 145-year-old stone house in Cockeysville led to $3,000 in fines for its owners.The Department of Permits and Development Management issued the citation to Mary and Bill Kraft this week for violating the building code, performing work without a permit and not abating the violations, said John Reisinger, county buildings engineer.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | December 12, 2006
Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation (CHAP) will consider granting landmark status today to a row of historic downtown homes slated for demolition by Mercy Medical Center. Preservationists are trying to prevent the hospital from razing the 1820s-era houses in the 300 block of St. Paul Place, some of the oldest downtown, for a planned $292 million expansion. City housing officials gave Mercy a demolition permit Friday, and Baltimore Heritage, a preservation organization, immediately appealed, arguing that a law paving the way for Mercy to quickly get the permit passed the City Council improperly.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN REPORTER | December 9, 2006
Baltimore granted Mercy Medical Center a demolition permit yesterday to tear down a row of historic downtown houses for its $292 million expansion, but within hours preservationists had mounted a challenge based on open-government violations.
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