Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDemolition
IN THE NEWS

Demolition

FEATURED ARTICLES
EXPLORE
February 13, 2013
Tracy Camila Johns captured this serene shot of what was left of Laurel Mall in the early hours on Jan. 25. Johns said the mall "is very dear to me, because when I first came to live in Laurel, 22 years ago, one of the places I frequented was the Laurel Mall. I watched the structure deteriorate over the years, the diminishing number of stores and the ghost she became long before the doors were finally shut. I look forward to seeing her restored to an even greater glory. "
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 4, 2014
Work has begun on the major mixed-use development downtown that is to replace the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre with two glassy apartment towers and four floors of shopping, said a spokesman for Owings Mills developer David S. Brown Enterprises LTD . The garage beneath the theater closed this month and a construction fence now surrounds the property, located at the intersection of Charles and Baltimore streets. Formal demolition could start "any day," said Larry Lichtenauer of Lawrence Howard & Associates.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
The Board of Public Works gave the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene the green light Wednesday to move forward with the emergency demolition of 18 vacant buildings at the Henryton State Hospital Center in Carroll County. The center, which opened in 1922 to serve African-Americans with tuberculosis, has been closed since 1985, and there have been reports of vandalism and fires at the site. The state fire marshal had expressed concern that the vacant buildings pose a safety hazard — especially to firefighters.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Janice Jacobs-Hudson keeps informed about what goes on in the East Baltimore neighborhood of rowhouses where she has lived for more than 30 years. So Jacobs-Hudson, president of the Ashland Avenue Association, was surprised to find an artist painting a gigantic "pop-up" mural on a stretch of houses in the 2400 block of E. Eager St., including the house where she grew up. The houses, which are boarded up and vacant, are scheduled to be torn down over the next several months for a children's park.
EXPLORE
November 26, 2012
Even before it closed in May 2012, Laurel Mall had taken a big plunge from its glory days when it opened in 1979 as Laurel Centre, with Montgomery Ward and JC Penny as anchor stores and droves of shoppers. By 2001, as consumer shopping habits veered away from enclosed malls and with the opening of larger, nearby shopping complexes, Laurel Mall had begun to decline. Montgomery Ward's bankruptcy led to its store closing at the mall. A year later, JC Penney left as well. By 2005, the mall found itself in a court-ordered receivership when its owners, Laurel Centre Associates, could not pay their debts.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
Baltimore's historical preservation commission on Tuesday officially disapproved of demolishing the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre. The vote by the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation, or CHAP, means the city's Department of Housing and Community Development, which issues demolition permits, will not be able to proceed for at least six months. Owings Mills-based developer David S. Brown Enterprises Ltd. and the Washington architecture firm Shalom Baranes Associates released plans in the spring that called for the demolition of the Mechanic and the construction of two residential towers in its place.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2011
When Berea resident Nia Redmond heard that the long-vacant paint manufacturing plant in her East Baltimore neighborhood was to be torn down, she went door to door passing out fliers, inviting her neighbors to an emergency meeting. "A lot of us are still planting vegetables in our yards and we don't want to eat lead," Redmond said. "This is an elderly neighborhood. A lot of people already have asthma in here; a lot of people already have emphysema in here. " Early next year, the city is set to demolish the Ainsworth Paint and Chemical Co. plant, an empty eyesore for more than 20 years at the corner of Edison Highway and East Biddle Street.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | January 9, 1995
A City Council member and several members of Westminster's Historic District Commission say they're worried about a proposed ordinance that would make it easier for the city to tear down dilapidated buildings.But sponsors of the proposal say demolition would be a last resort to deal with property owners who have not repaired buildings that are unfit for human habitation.The council is scheduled to vote tonight on the ordinance and on proposed amendments requiring a review by the Historic District Commission and council approval before the city could go to court to force the demolition of a derelict building.
NEWS
Baltimore Sun staff | September 25, 2013
A day after beginning demolition of three vacant blocks in East Baltimore, city housing officials say they will work with the residents of the only inhabited home to potentially allow them to stay. The housing department had said it planned to knock down the homes on the 1600 block of N. Bethel St. as part of a demolition that began Tuesday with adjacent Lansing Avenue . The effort is part of a broader revitalization plan for the area. Ralph Gatheright, 74, lives in the only house not boarded up on Lansing or his stretch of Bethel, and said he was not aware of the city's intention for his home.
NEWS
December 30, 2011
What accounts for the unfairly sensational tone of your recent article on Baltimore City's legitimate - and sensible - use of affordable housing funds to demolish vacant eyesores ("City 'affordable housing' fund destroys more houses than it builds," Dec. 26)? Didn't The Sun take Housing Commissioner Paul Graziano to task just six months ago for overspending on affordable housing units in Johnston Square? Johnston Square should have taught us that government bureaucracies are not well-suited to meeting the complicated economic and logistical challenges of developing new housing, affordable or otherwise.
BUSINESS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Brian Street stepped outside the barber shop where he works Monday at the mostly abandoned Old Town Mall to see a crowd of people surveying the corridor and discussing plans to demolish some of the empty buildings. A group of officials, including Gov. Martin O'Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, came to the 16-acre outdoor mall to announce a $300,000 investment to prepare the site for re-development. In all, the state's Strategic Demolition and Smart Growth Impact Fund will provide $5 million for 13 revitalization projects across Maryland.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
For years, the city has fought blight with excavators, clawing down abandoned and decrepit buildings. This month, it started to attack its vacant home problem by hand, signing off on a plan to take apart a selection of houses brick by brick. Proponents say the program will be able to pay for the added labor expense by selling the salvaged materials, especially Baltimore's iconic red brick. They believe the venture will help turn the city's multimillion-dollar demolition program into an environmentally friendly job creator, without costing much more than a typical tear-down.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2013
When demolition begins next week on several blocks of rowhomes, it will mark the start of a new phase for the nonprofit created by the city and others to redevelop 88 acres in East Baltimore just north of the Johns Hopkins University medical campus. East Baltimore Development Inc. is transitioning from an all-encompassing entity that performed functions as diverse as street cleaning and after-school programs as well as land acquisition and demolition, to one largely focused on attracting developers to build new housing.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | December 5, 2013
Bricks scattered Thursday as a yellow excavator nudged the top story of a decrepit Wilson Street rowhouse, one of six set to be demolished in Upton this week as part of the city's effort to reduce blight. "It's bringing tears to my eyes," said Rick Sussman, the head of the Pennsylvania Avenue Merchants Association, whose family has operated a business next door since 1919 and who has pushed the city for years to tear down the eyesores.  "I'm having flashbacks to all the people who have lived here.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
The inner loop of the Baltimore Beltway north of the city will be completely closed to traffic during overnight hours next week, as crews demolish the last of the old interchange bridges near Interstate 95, according to the Maryland Transportation Authority. The work is part of a $1.1 billion project to install new electronic toll lanes and improve traffic flow and safety in the spaghetti-like interchange in Rossville, where the beltway, or Interstate 695, intersects with I-95. The bridge being demolished used to carry I-95 traffic over the beltway, said John Sales, a MdTA spokesman.
NEWS
Baltimore Sun staff | September 25, 2013
A day after beginning demolition of three vacant blocks in East Baltimore, city housing officials say they will work with the residents of the only inhabited home to potentially allow them to stay. The housing department had said it planned to knock down the homes on the 1600 block of N. Bethel St. as part of a demolition that began Tuesday with adjacent Lansing Avenue . The effort is part of a broader revitalization plan for the area. Ralph Gatheright, 74, lives in the only house not boarded up on Lansing or his stretch of Bethel, and said he was not aware of the city's intention for his home.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2011
Demolition will begin next month at the Charles Village Pub & Patio, a popular hangout for Towson University students, which its owners say they plan to rebuild after it caught fire in January. From 8 p.m. March 11 until 8 a.m. March 12, Pennsylvania Avenue, between York Road and Washington Avenue, will remain closed while the building is demolished, according to a statement from Councilman David Marks. One of the bar's owners, Rick Bielski, said that the outpouring of support has prompted them to reopen.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | December 5, 2013
Bricks scattered Thursday as a yellow excavator nudged the top story of a decrepit Wilson Street rowhouse, one of six set to be demolished in Upton this week as part of the city's effort to reduce blight. "It's bringing tears to my eyes," said Rick Sussman, the head of the Pennsylvania Avenue Merchants Association, whose family has operated a business next door since 1919 and who has pushed the city for years to tear down the eyesores.  "I'm having flashbacks to all the people who have lived here.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 7, 2013
A contractor began to take down a house slated for demolition as part of a highway upgrade project in Aberdeen Tuesday and then abruptly stopped when the crew found some hidden asbestos. The home, at the corner of Route 22 and Graceford Drive, is one of 18 to be razed along Route 22 (Aberdeen Thruway) between Beards Hill Road and the Aberdeen Proving Ground gate in conjunction with BRAC-related intersection improvements along the highway. The ranch-style home at 355 Graceford was slated to be the first home demolished, according to a Maryland State Highway Administration media advisory sent Monday afternoon.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
The Board of Public Works gave the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene the green light Wednesday to move forward with the emergency demolition of 18 vacant buildings at the Henryton State Hospital Center in Carroll County. The center, which opened in 1922 to serve African-Americans with tuberculosis, has been closed since 1985, and there have been reports of vandalism and fires at the site. The state fire marshal had expressed concern that the vacant buildings pose a safety hazard — especially to firefighters.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.