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By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | May 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Albert R. Wynn, a moderate Democrat from Prince George's County who survived a strong challenge from a liberal primary opponent in the fall, is co-sponsoring a measure to impeach Vice President Dick Cheney. Wynn became the third co-sponsor of the resolution introduced last month by Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich, an Ohio Democrat who is running for president on an antiwar platform. In his proposed articles of impeachment, Kucinich says Cheney intentionally manipulated intelligence to deceive Congress and the American people about suspected weapons of mass destruction in Iraq and a relationship between al-Qaida and the government of Saddam Hussein.
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NEWS
March 26, 2010
Since Sunday's vote in the House of Representatives to pass health care reform, at least 10 Democrats who voted for the bill have received threats. Some have had bricks thrown through their office doors. In Virginia, a tea party protester published what he thought was a Democratic congressman's home address and urged people to drop by and show their opposition. Soon thereafter, a propane line at the house, which belongs to the congressman's brother, was cut, and a threatening letter was sent to the home.
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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 25, 2000
WASHINGTON -- To the John McCain camp, the Democrats who rallied to the senator's side in the Michigan Republican primary were reform-minded swing voters who have been attracted in the past to candidates like Ross Perot and Patrick J. Buchanan. But to the George W. Bush team, the McCain Democrats -- who gave the Arizona senator his margin of victory Tuesday -- were mischief-makers, out to toy with the Republican race. Pollsters, pundits and politicians are still chewing over the identities of the Democrats who voted for McCain and the meaning of their show of support for him. Were they typical of moderate Democrats across the country who are attracted to the candidate and would vote for him against a Democrat in the fall?
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | May 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Albert R. Wynn, a moderate Democrat from Prince George's County who survived a strong challenge from a liberal primary opponent in the fall, is co-sponsoring a measure to impeach Vice President Dick Cheney. Wynn became the third co-sponsor of the resolution introduced last month by Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich, an Ohio Democrat who is running for president on an antiwar platform. In his proposed articles of impeachment, Kucinich says Cheney intentionally manipulated intelligence to deceive Congress and the American people about suspected weapons of mass destruction in Iraq and a relationship between al-Qaida and the government of Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 2, 2001
WASHINGTON - With most Democrats vigorously dissenting, the Senate confirmed the nomination of John Ashcroft to be attorney general yesterday, giving President Bush a staunch conservative to serve as his administration's top legal officer. The 58-42 vote, in which just eight of 50 Democrats joined all 50 Republicans in favor of their former Senate colleague, completes the installation of Bush's Cabinet and concludes the most divisive debate of his young presidency. But Democrats said the closeness of the vote should serve as a warning to Bush against nominating other highly conservative figures to major posts.
NEWS
March 27, 1991
We agree with H. Ross Perot, the Texas entrepreneur and public-policy idea man, on the postwar partisan political debate. He said it was on the third-grade level of name-calling.Sen. Phil Gramm, R-Texas, didn't even wait for the war to end before he sent out a party fund-raising letter referring to Democrats in Congress as "appeasement before country liberals." Other Republicans have resorted to even more demagogic statements, accusing Democrats of trying to undermine President Bush's efforts.
NEWS
By Frank Starr and Frank Starr,Chief of The Sun's Washington Bureau | March 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Phil Gramm, the Texas Democrat-turned-Republican, and Sen. Charles Robb, a stiff-backed former Marine and now a Democrat from Virginia, got down in the trenches yesterday.The issue was patriotism, Mr. Robb said.No, said Mr. Gramm, it was leadership.In fact, it was the war vote and politics. Mr. Robb said now is not the time to be exploiting the Persian Gulf war for partisan advantage.Nonsense, said Mr. Gramm, if the Mideast war became partisan it's because the Democrats made it so. And since they did, it's fair to point out that they're not fit to lead the country, he added.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund XTC and Peter Osterlund XTC,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 1, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md., said yesterday that she will vote against Judge Clarence Thomas' nomination to the Supreme Court when the matter comes before the Senate, possibly Friday.Her misgivings reflect the qualms many Democrats -- and a few Republicans -- have expressed about President Bush's latest Supreme Court nominee.Judge Thomas, once expected to win Senate endorsement easily, has been criticized by lawmakers of both parties for testimony during his confirmation hearings that struck many as overly evasive.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 1, 2004
WASHINGTON - The House yesterday rejected a proposed constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage but gave Republican leaders a consolation prize by putting lawmakers on record on an issue that will be used as campaign fodder in the November elections. The "Marriage Protection Amendment," backed by President Bush, fell 49 votes short of the two-thirds majority required to begin the process of changing the Constitution. The vote was 227 for and 186 against. But the amendment's supporters said the House vote was just the beginning of a long effort to pass the measure.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | November 16, 1993
WASHINGTON -- When President Clinton squeaked through on his deficit-reduction package with nary a Republican vote earlier this year, he was criticized in some quarters for risking defeat by not taking a bipartisan approach, even though doing so no doubt would have further compromised the package.Well, he has now taken the bipartisan route on the North American Free Trade Agreement and finds himself in another cliffhanger anyway as a result of the defection of a majority of House Democrats.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Former Sen. John Edwards was the first national Democrat to congratulate anti-war candidate Ned Lamont on his primary victory over Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman, but the phone call wasn't really about Connecticut. Edwards is aggressively pursuing his party's presidential nomination, and his call was a reflection of Lamont's emergence as a liberal hero and nod to the new reality of this election year. Anti-war fever is raging. Democrats, especially those on the left, are angry and aroused, and candidates ignore them at their peril.
NEWS
By GWYNETH K. SHAW and GWYNETH K. SHAW,SUN REPORTER | June 15, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Republican-led House is billing today's debate on the Iraq war as the most in-depth in more than three years, but the deliberations are shaping up to be more of a partisan cage match than a serious discussion of policy. The debate, say critics, is a barely disguised effort to give President Bush a partisan pat on the back and to put Democrats on the defensive heading into the midterm elections. House Republican leader John A. Boehner of Ohio said he scheduled it so lawmakers could speak on what he called "the No. 1 concern in America."
NEWS
By Jan Crawford Greenburg and Jill Zuckman | September 23, 2005
WASHINGTON -- John G. Roberts Jr. moved a step closer yesterday to becoming the nation's 17th chief justice, as the Senate Judiciary Committee voted to approve his nomination to the Supreme Court, but not before signaling to the White House that its next nominee will face a much tougher fight. The 13-5 vote sends Roberts' nomination to the Senate floor, where a vote is expected by Thursday. His confirmation is a foregone conclusion: All of the Senate's 55 Republicans and at least a dozen Democrats are expected to vote for him. Once confirmed, Roberts can move into his chambers and start analyzing cases, just days before the court's new term begins Oct. 3. In supporting Roberts' nomination, the committee's 10 Republicans - and the three Democrats who joined them - stressed his sterling qualifications, keen intellect and respect for the law. "I don't see how anybody can justify a vote against Judge Roberts, unless they want to nitpick certain areas that you can nitpick on anybody," said Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, a Utah Republican.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 28, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Democrats agonizing over finding their way back from their 2004 presidential defeat got a lesson in how not to do it in the Senate vote to confirm Condoleezza Rice as secretary of state. Explaining why he would vote to confirm the former Bush national security adviser, Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. of Delaware, the Foreign Relations Committee's ranking Democrat, quoted Samuel Johnson's observation that "a second marriage is the triumph of hope over experience." It was a rationale shared if not uttered by 31 other Senate Democrats who swallowed their dissatisfaction with Ms. Rice's role in the run-up to the Iraq invasion and its aftermath.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 1, 2004
WASHINGTON - The House yesterday rejected a proposed constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage but gave Republican leaders a consolation prize by putting lawmakers on record on an issue that will be used as campaign fodder in the November elections. The "Marriage Protection Amendment," backed by President Bush, fell 49 votes short of the two-thirds majority required to begin the process of changing the Constitution. The vote was 227 for and 186 against. But the amendment's supporters said the House vote was just the beginning of a long effort to pass the measure.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 2, 2001
WASHINGTON - With most Democrats vigorously dissenting, the Senate confirmed the nomination of John Ashcroft to be attorney general yesterday, giving President Bush a staunch conservative to serve as his administration's top legal officer. The 58-42 vote, in which just eight of 50 Democrats joined all 50 Republicans in favor of their former Senate colleague, completes the installation of Bush's Cabinet and concludes the most divisive debate of his young presidency. But Democrats said the closeness of the vote should serve as a warning to Bush against nominating other highly conservative figures to major posts.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 28, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Democrats agonizing over finding their way back from their 2004 presidential defeat got a lesson in how not to do it in the Senate vote to confirm Condoleezza Rice as secretary of state. Explaining why he would vote to confirm the former Bush national security adviser, Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. of Delaware, the Foreign Relations Committee's ranking Democrat, quoted Samuel Johnson's observation that "a second marriage is the triumph of hope over experience." It was a rationale shared if not uttered by 31 other Senate Democrats who swallowed their dissatisfaction with Ms. Rice's role in the run-up to the Iraq invasion and its aftermath.
NEWS
March 26, 1992
Having suffered a close but humiliating defeat in Connecticut at the hands of Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown Jr., Gov. Bill Clinton now focuses on New York, where he was ahead in polls taken before the Connecticut vote. He has already begun attacking Mr. Brown head on, savaging his flat tax in a way that suggests personal attacks will also intensify.New York is important to Mr. Clinton, and Mr. Brown is an obstacle, but the front-runner from Arkansas misses the point of Connecticut and of the polls if he thinks his problem is Jerry Brown.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 25, 2000
WASHINGTON -- To the John McCain camp, the Democrats who rallied to the senator's side in the Michigan Republican primary were reform-minded swing voters who have been attracted in the past to candidates like Ross Perot and Patrick J. Buchanan. But to the George W. Bush team, the McCain Democrats -- who gave the Arizona senator his margin of victory Tuesday -- were mischief-makers, out to toy with the Republican race. Pollsters, pundits and politicians are still chewing over the identities of the Democrats who voted for McCain and the meaning of their show of support for him. Were they typical of moderate Democrats across the country who are attracted to the candidate and would vote for him against a Democrat in the fall?
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 24, 1998
WASHINGTON -- With the political fate of President Clinton now shifting to the Senate for trial, some significant changes will occur in the deliberations, mostly in his favor.Most importantly, two-thirds (67 senators) is required for conviction. With 45 Democrats in the Senate, the prospect, at the outset at least, must be rated slim to none. If the 55 Republicans voted as a bloc, 12 Democrats would have to break with their party's president to remove him from office.The near-solidarity shown against impeachment by House Democrats for a president whose personal actions they readily condemned demonstrated how GOP partisanship had stiffened Democratic resolve.
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