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By THEO LIPPMAN JR | November 20, 1994
How bad was the Democratic defeat in the House of Representatives, judged against the historical record of off-year elections?It was the worst whipping a president's party has taken in exactly 100 years, when Grover Cleveland was in the White House.I figure this a little differently than most analysts do. I figure that to get the true meaning of the numbers in an off-year election, you have to consolidate them with the numbers from the election preceding it.Normally in a presidential election year, the winning presidential candidate's party picks up seats in the House.
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NEWS
November 19, 2013
"Dissent is the highest form of patriotism. " During George W. Bush's term that sentiment was often seen, usually with a statement of support for Democratic Party candidates. Now that President Barack Obama is in office, those who dissent are vilified and bullied by representatives of the party who espoused dissent a few years before. When opposition to the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) was voiced, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid called the dissenters "anarchists," and Sen. Barbara Boxer likened them to those who commit domestic abuse.
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NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | October 9, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 35th in 1924 was the second of three huge Republicanlandslides of the 1920s. Warren Harding, besieged by scandal, had died in 1923. An unsullied Calvin Coolidge of Massachusetts succeeded him and was renominated with no trouble.The Democrats, divided by region, race, religion and Prohibition, struggled for 103 ballots before nominating John W. Davis, a New York lawyer with little elective experience.Republicans ran a status-quo campaign, and with prosperity widespread among the voting public, were able to fend off Democratic criticisms of the Harding scandals.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 25, 2005
IN THE springtime of his 62nd year, Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin will assume a posture that has never in his lifetime fit him: He is going to take a political chance. Tomorrow he is slated to announce his candidacy for the U.S. Senate. This is lovely news for everyone who has admired him through the years for his intelligence and his integrity. But it perplexes all those wondering: Does this new spirit of adventure include a willingness to speak out, and speak with new forcefulness, in a time when Democrats across the country find themselves pushed around daily like the squirts on a schoolyard playground?
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | September 12, 1994
THE PARTY in power in the White House usually loses seats in Congress in off-year elections.In 1990, 1986 and 1982, Presidents Reagan and Bush saw the Republicans lose. Jimmy Carter's Democrats lost in 1978. President Nixonford's Republicans lost in 1974. They also lost seats in 1970. Lyndon Johnson's Democrats lost seats in 1966, Eisenhower's Republicans in 1958 and 1954 and Truman's Democrats in 1950 and 1946.In the post-war period only John F. Kennedy was spared an off-year defeat. He got an off-year tie. His Democrats lost four seats in the House but gained four in the Senate.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | November 11, 1990
Charles Black of the Republican National Committee says Tuesday's election was a big victory for George Bush and the Republicans, relatively and historically speaking. He's wrong.He's wrong because he's comparing only half the relevant history.Mr. Black said the average loss of House seats by the president's party in off-year elections has been 29 and the average loss in the Senate has been three. Since Republicans lost only nine seats in the House and one in the Senate in thisoff-year election, a claim of victory -- or at least satisfaction -- sounds justified.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | November 2, 1998
SOME pundits are saying that voters are likely to succumb to the so-called six-year itch for tomorrow's midterm elections. That's the urge to scratch the president's party in congressional elections in the sixth year of his administration.So the Democrats could lose big. That is the historical flow. No doubt about it. But I think you can make too much of it. I think those who subscribe to the six-year itch theory have a point, but they overlook or ignore something, which leads to exaggeration.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 4, 1992
IF ALLAN LICHTMAN is right, George Bush better hope and pray the L.A. riot is not the beginning of "sustained social unrest." If it is, Bush gets beat in November, according to Professor Lichtman's never-fail formula for predicting presidential elections.Lichtman's formula involves 13 "keys" to an election. If an incumbent's party's nominee gets eight of them, he wins. Last month Lichtman, of American University, told the Christian Science Monitor that he calculates Bush has eight keys and so should be re-elected if nothing changes.
NEWS
August 23, 1996
They called themselves "Democratic-Republican." Then "Republican Delegates from the Several States." Then, at a convention in Baltimore in 1832, they adopted the name that has endured: Democrats.Baltimore must have charmed them. The Democrats returned for their next five conventions, through 1852. Baltimore's attraction? In the decades when slavery was being debated, the city seemed a safe, middle ground between North and South.The Democrats hold their latest convention next week, this time in Chicago.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 7, 1994
GLADE CREEK, N.C. -- At a Republican candidates night here last week an elderly woman rose to make a point. Her voice shaking with emotion, she told her neighbors, "Ever since they took the prayer out of the schools, they've been going downhill."A young farmer told a visitor: "She's right, you know. Those people in Washington, Clinton and them, just keep telling us what we've got to do and we keep going down in Washington."But there is neither much logic nor cohesiveness in the case voters are making against the incumbents they threaten in such large numbers.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
Party affiliation apparently mattered more than money in this year's Carroll County elections, as Democrats suffered a series of smashing defeats despite raising as much or more cash than many of their Republican opponents, a review of final campaign finance reports filed yesterday shows. In the county commissioners race, Republican incumbent Julia Walsh Gouge raised and spent the most money. She also received the most votes. But fellow Republicans Perry L. Jones Jr. and Dean L. Minnich won decisively even though they were among a cluster of commissioner candidates from both major parties who raised $13,000 to $17,000.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2002
Timothy J. McCrone, the Ellicott City Democrat who nearly beat incumbent Republican Marna L. McLendon in the 1998 race for Howard County state's attorney, announced yesterday that he will make another run for the office. "I find it very rewarding to be a part of doing justice, and being motivated only by that," McCrone, a 48-year-old father of three and former Howard prosecutor, said yesterday. In a race that will feature no incumbent - McLendon has said she will not seek a third term - McCrone's announcement at the Judge's Bench restaurant in Ellicott City last night had been long expected.
NEWS
By Neal Lavon | August 16, 2000
WASHINGTON -- It's a long way from the Democratic National Convention being held in Los Angeles this week, but in the 1830s, Democrat Simon Cameron suggested his party hold its national convention the third week in May of each presidential election year in Baltimore. His suggestion was never formally adopted, but 15 national political conventions were held in Baltimore during Cameron's lifetime, most of them involving the Democrats. Even so, the Democrats weren't the first to hold a convention in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | November 2, 1998
SOME pundits are saying that voters are likely to succumb to the so-called six-year itch for tomorrow's midterm elections. That's the urge to scratch the president's party in congressional elections in the sixth year of his administration.So the Democrats could lose big. That is the historical flow. No doubt about it. But I think you can make too much of it. I think those who subscribe to the six-year itch theory have a point, but they overlook or ignore something, which leads to exaggeration.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | August 5, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In politics the ultimate verdict always comes from the voters. In this capital these days, that means the critical question is how, if at all, a resolution of the Monica Lewinsky episode will affect the midterm congressional elections.The focus on that question has grown more intense, moreover, with the prospect that testimony from both Ms. Lewinsky and President Clinton will bring the issue to some resolution before November. Although there are many variables on two propositions on which political professionals in both parties seem to agree.
NEWS
August 23, 1996
They called themselves "Democratic-Republican." Then "Republican Delegates from the Several States." Then, at a convention in Baltimore in 1832, they adopted the name that has endured: Democrats.Baltimore must have charmed them. The Democrats returned for their next five conventions, through 1852. Baltimore's attraction? In the decades when slavery was being debated, the city seemed a safe, middle ground between North and South.The Democrats hold their latest convention next week, this time in Chicago.
NEWS
By William Schneider | November 2, 1990
WHAT'S GOING to kill us isn't high Democratic turnout, it's low Republican turnout," Craig Shirley, a Republican political consultant, told the Washington Post in a late-October interview.Shirley is half right. What's going to kill the Republicans this year is both high Democratic turnout and low Republican turnout. The key factor in this year's elections, as in all elections, is motivation to vote. This year, the Democrats have it. They feel angry and threatened. The Republicans don't. They have no message, and they have no leadership.
NEWS
By Neal Lavon | August 16, 2000
WASHINGTON -- It's a long way from the Democratic National Convention being held in Los Angeles this week, but in the 1830s, Democrat Simon Cameron suggested his party hold its national convention the third week in May of each presidential election year in Baltimore. His suggestion was never formally adopted, but 15 national political conventions were held in Baltimore during Cameron's lifetime, most of them involving the Democrats. Even so, the Democrats weren't the first to hold a convention in Baltimore.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | November 20, 1994
How bad was the Democratic defeat in the House of Representatives, judged against the historical record of off-year elections?It was the worst whipping a president's party has taken in exactly 100 years, when Grover Cleveland was in the White House.I figure this a little differently than most analysts do. I figure that to get the true meaning of the numbers in an off-year election, you have to consolidate them with the numbers from the election preceding it.Normally in a presidential election year, the winning presidential candidate's party picks up seats in the House.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 7, 1994
GLADE CREEK, N.C. -- At a Republican candidates night here last week an elderly woman rose to make a point. Her voice shaking with emotion, she told her neighbors, "Ever since they took the prayer out of the schools, they've been going downhill."A young farmer told a visitor: "She's right, you know. Those people in Washington, Clinton and them, just keep telling us what we've got to do and we keep going down in Washington."But there is neither much logic nor cohesiveness in the case voters are making against the incumbents they threaten in such large numbers.
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