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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2010
Both candidates in the Baltimore County Council District 3 race had some confessing to do at a community forum this week, but neither man revealed the full extent of his past troubles with the law. Democrat Ben Sutley and Republican Todd Huff were asked at the end of a 90-minute forum at The Lodge in Oregon Ridge on Monday night to talk about their own past conduct. The question, submitted by a member of the audience anonymously, reflected that word of Sutley's and Huff's legal troubles has been circulating for months, but neither had been asked openly to talk about it. Neither man went into detail about the incidents, which in Sutley's case involved driving while intoxicated and drug charges, and in Huff's case a conviction for leaving the scene of an accident, charges of passing a bad check and a handgun violation.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2010
In this year of hyper-partisan political rhetoric, County Council chairwoman Courtney Watson, a Democrat, has struck a different note in her re-election campaign. Cindy Ardinger, the campaign manager whom Watson introduced at her hotel fundraiser April 23, is a Republican, as were some of the guests rubbing shoulders with county employee union leaders and liberal Democrats such as County Executive Ken Ulman and U.S. Rep. John Sarbanes. Watson, who represents Ellicott City and Elkridge, is from a swing district where voters have elected both Democrats and Republicans.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Paul.west@baltsun.com | January 29, 2010
Washington - -President Barack Obama plans to extend a hand to his political antagonists at a House Republican retreat today in Baltimore. But the exchange - part of his election-year attempt to generate more bipartisanship in Washington - is unlikely to alter Republican behavior, say strategists and former members of Congress from both parties. "Republicans are emboldened. They think Obama has overshot the runway, and they're going to stick with their strategy," said Scott Reed, a Republican consultant.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,paul.west@baltsun.com | April 5, 2009
Washington -The power shift that ousted the Republicans and put Democrats in charge of Washington may be approaching a turning point. Evidence is still sketchy, but the trend that favored Democrats over the past five years may have run its course. Remember that special election for a congressional seat from New York? The one that would be the first referendum on Barack Obama's presidency and a make-or-break test for Republican National Chairman Michael Steele? It wound up a virtual tie, snuffing out attempts to exaggerate its significance.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA and JEAN MARBELLA,jean.marbella@baltsun.com | November 13, 2008
After a lengthy labor, we can slap that 1st Congressional District baby on the bottom and declare: It's a Democrat. The close and contentious race finally produced a winner Tuesday when Andy Harris conceded and Frank Kratovil declared victory, shifting the conservative-leaning district from Republican to Democratic hands for the first time since 1991. If it's true that victory has many fathers but defeat is an orphan, the parentage of Kratovil's win would have to include sheer timing (it was a good year for Democrats overall)
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 23, 2008
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration and congressional leaders moved closer to an agreement on a historic $700 billion bailout for financial firms yesterday, including tight congressional oversight and new help for homeowners at risk of foreclosure. But lawmakers in both parties voiced anger over the steep cost and even skepticism about the plan's chances of success. As a ferocious debate began on Capitol Hill yesterday, Congress and the administration remained at odds over specific features that some lawmakers are demanding, including limits on the pay of top executives whose firms seek help and new authority to allow bankruptcy judges to modify mortgage terms for borrowers facing foreclosure.
NEWS
By CHRIS GUY | September 2, 2008
1 Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest, ousted after nine terms in a bitter Republican primary campaign last winter, will cross party lines today to endorse Democrat Frank M. Kratovil Jr. in the 1st Congressional District. A senior member of Gilchrest's staff confirmed yesterday that the veteran lawmaker - who earned a reputation as a staunch environmentalist who frequently clashed with Republican Party leaders - will join Kratovil, an Eastern Shore prosecutor, at appearances today in Annapolis and Easton.
NEWS
August 29, 2008
ON THE ECONOMY Tonight, more Americans are out of work and more are working harder for less. More of you have lost your homes, and more are watching your home values plummet. More of you have cars you can't afford to drive, credit card bills you can't afford to pay and tuition that is beyond your reach. These challenges are not all of government's making. But the failure to respond is a direct result of a broken politics in Washington and the failed presidency of George W. Bush. America, we are better than these last eight years.
NEWS
April 3, 2008
BILL DICKINSON, 82 Former Congressman Former Rep. Bill Dickinson, a Democrat-turned-Republican who championed a strong defense and helped make Alabama a two-party state, died Monday at his Montgomery, Ala., home after suffering from colon cancer, longtime aide Walter Bamberg said. Mr. Dickinson, who served in the House from 1965 to 1993, was one of several Democrats recruited to change parties in 1964 and run as Republicans for Congress in a state that had been solidly Democratic for a century.
NEWS
January 8, 2008
Embedded in Democrat Barack Obama's success in the Iowa caucuses and potentially in today's presidential primary balloting in New Hampshire is his call for putting aside Washington partisanship to build "a working majority for change." "Change" is the primary buzzword, of course, now adopted by all candidates of both parties, who have learned that at a time of war and economic downturn, nobody's much interested in staying the course. But the phrase "working majority" has its own allure: Democrats and Republicans forming coalitions to achieve concrete results, threading a path between liberal and conservative extremes to address such thorny issues as universal health care, entitlement reform, energy resources and environmental controls.
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