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By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 8, 2000
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -Doreen Haas wants Governor Bush to pay for the election debacle - and not the Governor Bush from Texas. "Goodbye Jeb in 2002," said her sign, in pink and green glitter, referring to the Florida governor and brother of the candidate. "I think Jeb is behind this whole thing," said Haas, of Clearwater, at a Democratic rally at the Capitol this week. "I know Democrats who haven't voted in years who are calling me up to ask, `What can I do?'" If you think Texas Gov. George W. Bush is under pressure, consider the spot in which his younger brother finds himself.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | October 5, 2014
Thousands of miles on the road this summer and fall have afforded me the opportunity to observe a variety of political ads from across the spectrum. Herewith, observations from the heartland: I assume the relentless Democratic campaign to demonize the conservative Koch Brothers and their "Americans for Prosperity" organization has been poll tested, but I still don't get it. Driving negatives against someone (or something) that few people recognize violates a core tenet of political advertising.
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NEWS
July 1, 1998
IF THERE is one thing Americans agree on it is the need to rein in powerful managed-care groups that increasingly control a patient's health care decisions.Republicans in Congress, not wanting to cede this issue to Democrats in the fall, have put forth their own set of patients' rights that seems to satisfy no one.An insurance lobbyist calls the GOP plan "a mishmash of cobbled-together ideas." Consumer groups say it amounts to a timid baby step. Democrats accuse the GOP of catering to the health-care industry that helped put congressional Republicans in power.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 28, 2014
Probably no single episode did more to assure President Obama's 2012 re-election than that supposedly private fundraising lunch at which Mitt Romney famously declared that "47 percent of Americans" would never vote for him. The remark, unexpectedly captured on video, spread swiftly over the Internet and the airwaves, marking the hapless Mr. Romney in his own words as an elitist icon of the rich, unable or unwilling to comprehend how the other half...
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 28, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - As the new guy on the county bench, Judge Charles Burton drew a spot this summer on an obscure commission he didn't know existed: The Palm Beach County Canvassing Board. The gist of his duties, he was told, was to stay up late on Election Night and oversee returns from the county's 637 precincts. That was three weeks, thousands of ballots and countless news conferences, appearances on "Nightline" and the "Today" show ago. It was before his increasingly haggard-looking picture would grace the front page of newspapers across the country, before reporters would gather around and hang on his every word, before gaggles of teen-age girls would show up and ask to pose for photos with him. The 42-year-old father of two, a Democrat appointed in May to his day job handling misdemeanors and drunken driving cases by Republican Gov. Jeb Bush, out of necessity and political reality, became the face of the tedious, mind-numbing, closely watched hand counting with the presidential election in the balance.
NEWS
September 10, 2002
Registered Democrats and Republicans can vote in their party primaries today. Polls across the state open at 7 a.m. and close at 8 p.m. More information on your local polling place is available from the state election board at 800-222-8683 or its Web site, www.elections.state. md.us.
NEWS
By McCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS | November 27, 2007
We began questioning why Democrats and Republicans could have spirited but respectful competitions in the members' gym, but as soon as we left the gym and went to the floor of the House, we resembled an elementary school auditorium that had run amok."
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | May 3, 1999
The plan is to move the destitute near the prison. Safest place in town.The economy is up and inflation down. Must be something they're not telling us.Baltimore has the national museums of fish, lacrosse, dentistry, light bulbs and visionary art, but Arlington, Va., is getting the DEA's national narco museum, a winner.House Democrats and Republicans decided to bomb each other.Pub Date: 5/03/99
NEWS
May 16, 1991
Omar Burleson, a former U.S. representative known for his tremendous influence over conservatives from both parties during his 32 years in Congress, died Tuesday at the age of 85 in Abilene, Texas. Mr. Burleson, a Democrat, was elected in 1946 and retired in 1979. During the 1960s he headed the "Boll Weevil Club," a small group of conservative Democrats and Republicans who met informally behind closed doors to determine how votes would be cast on close bills.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 21, 2005
Computer messages revealed yesterday show another side to postings on a conservative Web site that sparked a firestorm of accusations between Democrats and Republicans and the resignation of longtime gubernatorial aide Joseph F. Steffen. Steffen was forced to resign by Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. after acknowledging to a reporter that he had written online, under the computer pseudonym "NCPAC," about spreading rumors on the conduct of Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley. Steffen made the comments in exchanges with someone using the name MD4BUSH, whose identity remains a mystery.
NEWS
July 5, 2013
Because Congress couldn't get its act together last month - not really all that surprising given the partisan gridlock in Washington - interest rates on federally subsidized Stafford student loans rose from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent on Monday. That's bad enough for college students trying to figure out how they will repay the debts they incur to finance their educations. What's worse is that practically nobody in Congress - neither Democrat nor Republican - wanted rates to go that high, yet lawmakers seemed powerless to prevent it. Democrats and Republicans both agreed the government should continue to subsidize college loans for the country's neediest students.
NEWS
By Robert Yentzer | January 28, 2013
When it comes to fixing America's ballooning debt problem, there is one policy option that both Democrats and Republicans should be rushing to embrace. It is the proposal to replace the current Consumer Price Index (CPI) with a more accurate measure of price inflation: the Chained-CPI. If this index were used to calculate cost of living increases in Social Security benefits, income tax brackets and the like, the government could realize significant savings. The current CPI's exaggerated estimates of inflation are a wasteful leak in the fiscal pipeline.
NEWS
November 30, 2012
Years ago I heard someone say that if you can write the problem on the board, it is half solved. Several times I have found it to be true. Letter writer John Brown did not correctly address the Republican's problem or the nation's ("The GOP lost because it's out of touch," Nov. 28). Too many people are jobless and living at poverty level with inadequate medical care while our nation is rapidly increasing its debt. But that is not the problem. That is the situation. And no one disagrees with it - not Democrats, not liberals, not journalists, not even Republicans.
NEWS
February 14, 2012
Your article, "New budget to renew battles" (Feb. 12) points out the stark and perhaps unprecedented separation between our two major political parties. Democrats continue to display timidity and confusion and are often too ready to compromise, but they have generally proposed balanced approaches to solving the nation's ills. Republicans on the other hand have taken several extreme and dangerous positions. All current candidates have pledged to reverse Roe v. Wade and to forcibly evict some 12 million undocumented workers and their families.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | June 30, 2011
President Barack Obama's news conference Wednesday - his first in 15 weeks - made clear his strategy for reelection is the same old clarion call for class warfare, pitting the evil rich against the saintly poor. "I think it's only fair," said the president, "to ask an oil company or a corporate jet owner that's doing so well to give up that tax break. …I don't think that's so radical. " In fact, he mentioned "corporate jet owners" half a dozen times during his appearance.
NEWS
June 7, 2011
I just can't take this anymore. I am sick of the Democrats (tax the rich) and Republicans (cut programs but not defense) and their endless back and forth about who is to blame for the deficit. Guess what gang? Both of you are. A perfect example of this is the commentary on June 7 titled "Tax cuts for the rich have made us poorer" by Rion Dennis and Roger Rath. All they do is complain about the Bush tax cuts. Could we slightly increase the tax rates for the very wealthy? Yes. But they fail to address the biggest problem in this country.
NEWS
July 26, 2006
Congressionally approved increases in loan interest rates are hitting college students and their families just as campaigns for fall elections are getting under way. Democrats and Republicans are scrambling to either offer relief or justify their actions before students and parents turn into angry voters. Politicians may be right to pay attention to middle-class voters, but the constituency they should really focus on is low-income students. At a time when college costs -- and student indebtedness -- continue to rise, Democrats are trying to capitalize on the fact that the Republican-controlled Congress used about $12 billion in savings from student aid programs to help reduce the deficit this year.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | March 1, 1992
WHEN:* Tuesday, polls open 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.WHO CAN VOTE:* Registered Democratic and Republican voters. The state's independent ("declined affiliate") voters can only vote in non-partisan local races, such as school board or, in Carroll County, charter board members.WHO'S ON THE BALLOT:* Candidates for President, one U.S. Senate seat, all eight House seats, delegates to the Democratic and Republican conventions and local judges.FOR PRESIDENT:* Six Democratic presidential candidates: Edmund G. Brown, Jr., Bill Clinton, Tom Harkin, Bob Kerrey, Lyndon H. LaRouche and Paul Tsongas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | June 6, 2011
U.S. Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas), a GOP presidential candidate, was on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday, and, as usual, the congressman skewered at least one sacred cow of American politics.  Paul's target this time? The notion that Republicans and Democrats are diametrically opposed political parties. You know, the idea that they're bitter political opponents. They fight over everything. They hate each other.  But the truth is, Paul said, they're the same party.  "We don’t have a good democratic process," Paul said.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | January 2, 2011
Bipartisanship broke out in the lame-duck Congress. Most notably, Republicans voted with Democrats for the New Start treaty with Russia and the end of a 17-year ban on openly gay soldiers. Does this signal a new era of bipartisanship in 2011? No chance. Neither of these victories had anything to do with the economy or taxes — in other words, with the central question of who gets what in America. President Barack Obama couldn't get a single Republican to agree to limit the Bush tax cuts to the first $250,000 of income.
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