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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1998
As he listened to the noisy banter of 200 Baltimore County Republicans gathered at his Fullerton fund-raiser, Allen Thompson, a political newcomer running for the 5th District council seat, couldn't help but be pleased.True, U.S. Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. couldn't attend, but the congressman's wife, Kendel, told the crowd he was "off doing God's work -- defining the word 'is' " -- a not-so-subtle reference to President Clinton's grand jury testimony.With a Democratic president on the defensive and native daughter Ellen R. Sauerbrey running hard for the governor's job, county Republicans hope to add seats on the County Council and in the legislature, solidifying the gains made in recent years.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 12, 2014
Now, the real fun starts. It's a mad, mad dash to the June 24 gubernatorial primary as the many undecided, unimpressed Democrats try to answer a what's-worse question that goes like this: What's worse, a lieutenant governor (Anthony Brown) who "squibbed the kickoff" of Obamacare or an attorney general (Doug Gansler) who did nothing about a beach-house party where teenagers appeared to be drinking alcoholic beverages? There's another question: Is Heather Mizeur too liberal to have any chance of beating the Republican candidate in November?
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NEWS
March 26, 1992
Having suffered a close but humiliating defeat in Connecticut at the hands of Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown Jr., Gov. Bill Clinton now focuses on New York, where he was ahead in polls taken before the Connecticut vote. He has already begun attacking Mr. Brown head on, savaging his flat tax in a way that suggests personal attacks will also intensify.New York is important to Mr. Clinton, and Mr. Brown is an obstacle, but the front-runner from Arkansas misses the point of Connecticut and of the polls if he thinks his problem is Jerry Brown.
NEWS
August 28, 2011
THE SUN POLL The Baltimore Sun commissioned a telephone survey of 742 likely Baltimore Democratic primary voters from Aug. 22 to 24. The Sun's pollster, OpinionWorks of Annapolis, used the Baltimore City Board of Elections database to identify registered voters with a history of voting in municipal primary elections, and gathered survey results from those who ranked their likelihood of voting in the upcoming September primary “50-50”...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 11, 1992
MIAMI -- Once again yesterday, Paul E. Tsongas' voting strength was limited to upper-income, highly educated whites, and he was unable to crack into Bill Clinton's basis of support among other Democrats, surveys of voters leaving the polling places showed.That breakdown was especially bad news for Mr. Tsongas, since the surveys showed the Democratic electorate in Florida to be much more heavily white and much more highly educated than it is likely to be in most primaries down the road.Mr.
NEWS
September 12, 1994
As Democratic voters go to the polls tomorrow to nominate a candidate for Anne Arundel County executive, we encourage them once more to choose Robert Agee. He knows government, thanks to 24 years of staff work for the county and state. His talent for developing innovative ways of doing things will help Anne Arundel at a time when it needs to find new, inexpensive methods for providing services. His plans for controlling crime, preserving the environment and revitalizing communities are sensible and sensitive to these tight fiscal times.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | April 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The four Republican members of Maryland's House delegation told Speaker Newt Gingrich yesterday that his idea to make the District of Columbia a new Maryland congressional district would have "dire impact" on the state.The plan -- which Gingrich staffers say they are researching -- would allow Washington residents to vote in Maryland's senatorial elections and elect their own House member. The district's 600,000 residents have no Senate representation and have a House delegate with limited voting power.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | April 14, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Voter participation is running at a record low rate in this year's presidential primaries, with four out of five of those eligible to vote staying home, according to a new study.A total of 18.9 percent of voting-age Americans have taken part ** in primaries so far, the non-partisan Committee for the Study of the American Electorate reported yesterday. The previous record low for a primary season was 20.6 percent in 1984.Compared with 1988, turnout this year is off nearly 12 percent, the report said.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer | August 2, 1994
SILVER SPRING -- American Joe Miedusiewski, decked out in white shirt, tie and tasseled loafers, kicked off a weeklong effort yesterday to persuade Montgomery County voters that he's not just a great name, but a credible candidate for governor, too."American's your first name?" asked a puzzled David H. Hill, regional service manager at Dixie Temporaries, as he looked over the campaign brochure that the state senator from blue-collar East Baltimore had just handed him.Replied Mr. Miedusiewski, unfazed: "It's a handle I hope people will not forget."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Staff Writer | February 19, 1992
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- In the end, the Democratic primary here has raised more questions than it has answered.The one that matters is this one: Where do the Democrats find the candidate who can take advantage of the vulnerability President Bush demonstrated so clearly here?No one in the Democratic Party except Paul Tsongas and his most devoted admirers would argue that the returns here produced a satisfying answer. So the second question is: Do the Democrats now try to recruit an alternative "third man" such as House Majority Leader Richard Gephardt?
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
Democrats are taking advantage of early voting in greater proportion than Republicans, the state elections board reports, suggesting that the party in power is turning out its base more effectively. In the first three days of early voting, registered Democrats, who make up 56 percent of the Maryland electorate, cast 63 percent of the ballots, according to elections board. Republicans, who make up 26 percent of the electorate, cast 27 percent of the ballots. Some good news for the GOP: Republican voters are outpacing Democrats in the 1st Congressional District, where state Sen. Andy Harris is trying to unseat Rep. Frank Kratovil in the Maryland's most competitive House race this year.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF | April 6, 2008
WASHINGTON -- John McCain's disadvantages seem to keep multiplying. He supports an unpopular war. His fundraising lags. The voters want change, and he's from the party in power. Now, Republican insiders are sniping at his campaign. Where does all that leave McCain, seven months before the election? According to the latest polls, he is essentially running even with Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. "He continues to be the luckiest man alive," says Scott Reed, a Republican strategist who ran Bob Dole's 1996 presidential campaign.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | February 14, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Democratic voters who turned out on Tuesday were younger and more likely to be African-American than in past years, an indication of how the campaign of Sen. Barack Obama reshaped Maryland's dominant party in the weeks leading up to this year's primary. Obama led in all areas of the state and among all age and education groups on his way to a win that helped propel him to a lead in the delegate count for the first time. As in other states, his victory was aided by young voters.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF | December 9, 2007
Philadelphia -- When she began her presidential run, Hillary Clinton asked Americans to give her a fresh look. "I may be the most famous woman you don't really know," the New York senator and former first lady said repeatedly. Implied in that remark was that she'd somehow be revealing more about herself as a presidential candidate that would cast her in a more favorable light. But if the polls and the view of one group of Democratic primary voters are any indication, she has more work to do. Many Democrats still have questions about Clinton, her character and whether she has a vision for the country.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | October 31, 2006
LARGO -- Republican Senate candidate Michael S. Steele won the endorsements yesterday of several black Democratic Prince George's County leaders - critical voices in the state's second-most-populous community - who declared their frustrations with the party and said their loyalties have been taken for granted for too long. "The party acts as though when they want our opinion they'll give it to us," said former two-term Prince George's County Executive Wayne K. Curry, a Democrat who endorsed Steele at the Infusions Tea Cafe.
NEWS
By RONALD BROWNSTEIN AND JANET HOOK | June 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Republican victory in a closely watched San Diego-area House race showed that even in a hostile political environment, the GOP can defend its strongholds against a stiff Democratic challenge. The result, however, shed little light on what seems the key question in this November's election: Can Republicans keep their House majority by also holding onto enough seats in districts more evenly balanced between the two parties? Throughout Washington, GOP officials shared a widespread sense of relief yesterday after Republican Brian Bilbray defeated Democrat Francine Busby in Tuesday's vote to succeed former GOP Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham, who resigned from office after pleading guilty to corruption charges last year.
NEWS
August 11, 1998
EILEEN M. Rehrmann has clarified the election for Democratic voters by ending her primary campaign for governor.Party faithful can now try to heal their self-inflicted wounds and support the incumbent, Parris N. Glendening, against likely Republican challenger Ellen R. Sauerbrey -- or not. There is no third way.For four years, some voters in both parties had hoped to avoid a rerun of the close 1994 contest. That one left a bitter aftertaste, with Ms. Sauerbrey graceless in defeat and Mr. Glendening bumptious upon taking office.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2004
Despite a series of politically provocative remarks, Comptroller William Donald Schaefer retains strong support among Maryland voters, who by an overwhelming margin view him as a straight-talking politician who should remain in his post. According to a poll conducted for The Sun, Marylanders approve of the job the 82-year-old comptroller is doing by a ratio of almost 2-1. While the poll brings good news for the former governor, it also raises warning flags. A breakdown of the numbers shows that Schaefer's popularity depends largely upon his support among Republicans while his backing among fellow Democrats has eroded.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - Former President Bill Clinton's heart bypass surgery will likely sideline one of the Democratic Party's premier campaigners for some, if not most, of the fall. Clinton, who delivered a major speech at the July convention that nominated Sen. John Kerry, had been expected to play a significant role in the campaign, raising money for the Democratic Party and its candidates around the country and helping turn out voters on Election Day. "It's a detriment if he's laid up for two months," said Democratic pollster Paul Maslin.
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