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NEWS
January 27, 1998
IN JAKARTA, the dictator Suharto announced his candidacy for a seventh five-year term as Indonesia's president. In response, the sunken rupiah has plunged even deeper into worthlessness.Worse, the 76-year-old and ailing Suharto hinted his vice president and heir would be his longtime pal and author of grandiose industrial projects bankrupting the country, B. J. Habibie, the technology minister. At least it was not one of the six Suharto children whose corrupt grip on the economy prevents a level playing field for real entrepreneurs.
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NEWS
By Lauren Shull and Lauren Shull,Special to The Sun | April 13, 2008
YORK, Pa. -- At York College's student center, seven students sit in a large room, quietly planning ways to challenge school policies. They have all the trappings of modern-day hippies: shaggy hair and piercings, new cell phones and old clothes. Ignoring loud music from a rock concert in the room next door, they focus on their to-do list, which includes changing the college's investment strategies and expanding its employment policy to protect gay workers.
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NEWS
October 2, 1996
WHEN BEOWULF FOUGHT Grendel, he wrenched the monster's arm off and displayed the bloody limb as a trophy of his victory. That was too graphic for the mother of one Baltimore County fifth-grader, who asked the school librarian to find something else for her daughter.If the incident had been reported, it might have become the bloody-arm trophy of the current "Banned Books Week." The horror! The founding text of all English literature on the hit list of philistine censors! No wonder the American Library Association's Mary R. Somerville fears the endangerment of "one of our most basic freedoms in a democratic society -- the freedom to choose for ourselves and our families what we wish to read.
NEWS
By William M. Evan | September 21, 2004
THERE IS increasing concern about the reliability of our voting technology as the presidential election approaches. Congress can do much to alleviate the worry. The growing popularity of electronic voting, which is projected to be used by about one-third of the voters in November, should be worrisome to our democratic society - in which information is one of the main building blocks of trust - because of the underlying secrecy associated with it. About 40 voting machine manufacturers are permitted to maintain strict proprietary control over the computer codes they use in these systems.
NEWS
May 28, 2004
GOOD GOVERNMENT is accountable government, which in turn rests firmly on public business being performed under the public's eye. This is a core tenet not just for news gatherers but for a democratic society -- and thus, of course, has long been state law in Maryland. In vetoing this week a bill that would have broadly defined the right to sue over violations of the state's Open Meetings Act, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. used spurious logic to perform a stunning disservice to all Marylanders -- by severely curtailing their only real means of enforcing this law. The vetoed bill would have altered the Open Meetings Act to clarify that "any person" could file such a lawsuit.
NEWS
By William M. Evan | September 21, 2004
THERE IS increasing concern about the reliability of our voting technology as the presidential election approaches. Congress can do much to alleviate the worry. The growing popularity of electronic voting, which is projected to be used by about one-third of the voters in November, should be worrisome to our democratic society - in which information is one of the main building blocks of trust - because of the underlying secrecy associated with it. About 40 voting machine manufacturers are permitted to maintain strict proprietary control over the computer codes they use in these systems.
NEWS
By PAUL H. LIBEN | February 16, 1993
Yonkers, New York. -- In Soviet tyranny's recent collapse, we have witnessed American democracy's decisive vindication. It is our democratic ideals and institutions that the anxious leaders of Eastern Europe and Russia wish to emulate. Clearly at stake is the salvation of their respective nations.In 1831, a 26-year-old aristocrat, Alexis de Tocqueville, had similar concerns. Revolutions in his beloved France in 1789 and 1830 had crippled its ancient triad of king, church and aristocracy. Seeing that an egalitarian social order was the French and European future, Tocqueville pondered this question: How could liberty, order and human dignity be preserved, and despotism, chaos and degradation be averted?
NEWS
November 3, 1994
President Clinton set the right tone for his security aides Saturday when he kept his public program after shots were fired at the White House. Frightening as the fusillade was, it should not panic White House officials or the Secret Service into ill-considered measures that would wrap the president in more of a protective cocoon. Certainly the safety of the president and his family is a prime concern. But so is seeing a flesh-and-blood chief executive and the stately building in which he works and lives.
NEWS
By Lauren Shull and Lauren Shull,Special to The Sun | April 13, 2008
YORK, Pa. -- At York College's student center, seven students sit in a large room, quietly planning ways to challenge school policies. They have all the trappings of modern-day hippies: shaggy hair and piercings, new cell phones and old clothes. Ignoring loud music from a rock concert in the room next door, they focus on their to-do list, which includes changing the college's investment strategies and expanding its employment policy to protect gay workers.
NEWS
June 1, 1994
Unsafe PlanetI am writing concerning the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. What most people simply can't comprehend is the question, "Why is this even permitted?"The New World Order has for its forum and court the United Nations. What is the purpose, then, for a Security Council comprised, with veto power, of a few high-powered industrialized countries?There can never be a true world democracy, and therefore true democratic solutions to world problems, as long as this arm of the U.N. exists.This veto power has functioned as a colossal impasse time and again.
NEWS
May 28, 2004
GOOD GOVERNMENT is accountable government, which in turn rests firmly on public business being performed under the public's eye. This is a core tenet not just for news gatherers but for a democratic society -- and thus, of course, has long been state law in Maryland. In vetoing this week a bill that would have broadly defined the right to sue over violations of the state's Open Meetings Act, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. used spurious logic to perform a stunning disservice to all Marylanders -- by severely curtailing their only real means of enforcing this law. The vetoed bill would have altered the Open Meetings Act to clarify that "any person" could file such a lawsuit.
NEWS
January 27, 1998
IN JAKARTA, the dictator Suharto announced his candidacy for a seventh five-year term as Indonesia's president. In response, the sunken rupiah has plunged even deeper into worthlessness.Worse, the 76-year-old and ailing Suharto hinted his vice president and heir would be his longtime pal and author of grandiose industrial projects bankrupting the country, B. J. Habibie, the technology minister. At least it was not one of the six Suharto children whose corrupt grip on the economy prevents a level playing field for real entrepreneurs.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Thomas W. Waldron contributed to this article | December 4, 1997
Maryland's top lawmakers announced yesterday they have launched an ethics probe into state Sen. Larry Young and his outside business interests, and law enforcement sources said that the State Prosecutor's Office has opened a criminal investigation into the senator's conduct.The probes come in response to a two-month investigation published by The Sun yesterday that reported the powerful politician has been capitalizing on his public position to generate consulting and other fees from institutions and health care firms with millions at stake in the General Assembly.
NEWS
October 2, 1996
WHEN BEOWULF FOUGHT Grendel, he wrenched the monster's arm off and displayed the bloody limb as a trophy of his victory. That was too graphic for the mother of one Baltimore County fifth-grader, who asked the school librarian to find something else for her daughter.If the incident had been reported, it might have become the bloody-arm trophy of the current "Banned Books Week." The horror! The founding text of all English literature on the hit list of philistine censors! No wonder the American Library Association's Mary R. Somerville fears the endangerment of "one of our most basic freedoms in a democratic society -- the freedom to choose for ourselves and our families what we wish to read.
NEWS
November 3, 1994
President Clinton set the right tone for his security aides Saturday when he kept his public program after shots were fired at the White House. Frightening as the fusillade was, it should not panic White House officials or the Secret Service into ill-considered measures that would wrap the president in more of a protective cocoon. Certainly the safety of the president and his family is a prime concern. But so is seeing a flesh-and-blood chief executive and the stately building in which he works and lives.
NEWS
June 1, 1994
Unsafe PlanetI am writing concerning the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. What most people simply can't comprehend is the question, "Why is this even permitted?"The New World Order has for its forum and court the United Nations. What is the purpose, then, for a Security Council comprised, with veto power, of a few high-powered industrialized countries?There can never be a true world democracy, and therefore true democratic solutions to world problems, as long as this arm of the U.N. exists.This veto power has functioned as a colossal impasse time and again.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | March 3, 1993
Has Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke found a way to Gov. William Donald Schaefer's heart?Not that he's trying. The two men have feuded over real and imagined slights for years.But Mr. Schmoke's recent suggestion that he might run for governor in 1994 could lead Mr. Schaefer to believe Mr. Schmoke is not all bad.The governor harbors a hope of serving again as mayor of Baltimore.For that to occur, Mr. Schmoke needs to find other work. So, the mayor's aspirations represent a potential opening for Mr. Schaefer.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND AND JULES WITCOVER | May 30, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- The Ross Perot phenomenon is supposed to convey the message that the voters are fed up with politics as usual, including its negative and destructive tone. But that message obviously is not being taken to heart in the primaries for California's two U.S. Senate seats.The most outrageous commercial yet is one being run by state controller Gray Davis against former San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein in their contest for the Democratic nomination to fill the two years remaining in the term that Pete Wilson vacated when he became governor.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | March 3, 1993
Has Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke found a way to Gov. William Donald Schaefer's heart?Not that he's trying. The two men have feuded over real and imagined slights for years.But Mr. Schmoke's recent suggestion that he might run for governor in 1994 could lead Mr. Schaefer to believe Mr. Schmoke is not all bad.The governor harbors a hope of serving again as mayor of Baltimore.For that to occur, Mr. Schmoke needs to find other work. So, the mayor's aspirations represent a potential opening for Mr. Schaefer.
NEWS
By PAUL H. LIBEN | February 16, 1993
Yonkers, New York. -- In Soviet tyranny's recent collapse, we have witnessed American democracy's decisive vindication. It is our democratic ideals and institutions that the anxious leaders of Eastern Europe and Russia wish to emulate. Clearly at stake is the salvation of their respective nations.In 1831, a 26-year-old aristocrat, Alexis de Tocqueville, had similar concerns. Revolutions in his beloved France in 1789 and 1830 had crippled its ancient triad of king, church and aristocracy. Seeing that an egalitarian social order was the French and European future, Tocqueville pondered this question: How could liberty, order and human dignity be preserved, and despotism, chaos and degradation be averted?
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