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By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 18, 1991
MOSCOW -- The anti-Communist opposition movement Democratic Russia denounced yesterday an explosion that wrecked its headquarters Thursday night as "political terrorism," but vowed that it would not derail the campaign of Boris N. Yeltsin for the Russian presidency."
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 24, 2002
MOSCOW - Two years after Vladimir V. Putin became president of Russia, many Westerners still regard him as an enigma. They can't decide if he is a reformer trying to open his nation up to the West or an autocrat bent on amassing power in his own hands. The answer? He is both. Putin is dragging Russia - muttering and grumbling - into 21st-century Europe. He has forged a strategic partnership with his nation's archrival, the United States. He has tamed the country's immensely influential oligarchs.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 22, 1990
MOSCOW -- Democrats from 10 of the Soviet Union's fledgling parties and two dozen other political organizations formed a united front yesterday against the shaken but not yet beaten Communist Party.Democratic Russia, which claims support from 30 percent of the parliament of the Russian Federation and 60 percent of both the Moscow and Leningrad city councils, hopes to achieve a step-by-step takeover of power from the Communist Party, which has governed the Soviet Union for 73 years.To end this long monopoly on power, the new democratic movement, in a series of resolutions adopted at a weekend congress in Moscow, called for creating a multiparty democracy with a market economy based on private ownership of property.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | November 7, 1992
MOSCOW -- With the moving van outside, U.S. Ambassador Robert S. Strauss gave a farewell assessment of Russia, its president and its future last night."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | April 3, 1991
MOSCOW -- People who wonder why Soviet reform seems stalled and why conservatives again seem on the offensive might well consider the experience at a classic Soviet industrial fortress such as Moscow's giant ZIL truck plant -- the letters stand for Factory Named for Likhachyov, one of its first directors.If Soviet politics were a prizefight, this would be the matchup:In one corner, the reigning champion: the Communist Party. Has virtually run the plant for 73 of its 75 years. Has 10,000 members among the 60,000 ZIL workers, its own three-story headquarters and a paid staff of 38 people.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 26, 1991
MOSCOW -- The Soviet government banned yesterday all political demonstrations in Moscow until mid-April to prevent backers of Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin from holding a mass rally to support him in a showdown with Communist Party conservatives this week.A government order, requested by President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, prohibited the "Let Us Defend Yeltsin" rally that had been planned for central Moscow, just outside the Kremlin, on Thursday when the Russian Congress of People's Deputies begins a special session.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 17, 1991
MOSCOW -- A powerful explosion last night destroyed the headquarters of the Soviet Union's major anti-Communist opposition movement in what appeared to be the first political bombing in the capital in more than a decade.No one was injured in the blast, which occurred just after 10:20 p.m. in the old brick building occupied by Democratic Russia a few hundred yards from the Kremlin. One activist, Alexander Fonyakin, was in a back room at the time and leapt from a ground-floor window when the explosion occurred.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of the Sun | October 21, 1990
MOSCOW -- In 1986, when fledgling Russian democratic groups held a conference, they hid from authorities in the woods outside Leningrad.In 1988, when protesters unfurled anti-Communist posters on Pushkin Square in downtown Moscow, they could count on being hustled away by police and jailed.Yesterday, more than 2,000 delegates gathered in a Pushkin Square movie theater to found a single, anti-Communist, pro-democratic movement across Russia aimed at completing the dismantling of what one leader called "the totalitarian nightmare."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 27, 1991
MOSCOW -- Moscow officials and the Democratic Russia reform movement flatly rejected yesterday the Kremlin's new ban on political demonstrations and vowed that a rally in support of Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin would go ahead tomorrow as planned.But Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, apparently determined to prevent any show of popular backing for his chief political rival, stripped the reformist Moscow leadership of control over the capital's police force. His decree put the force directly under the Soviet Ministry of Internal Affairs.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | November 7, 1992
MOSCOW -- With the moving van outside, U.S. Ambassador Robert S. Strauss gave a farewell assessment of Russia, its president and its future last night."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | February 20, 1992
MOSCOW -- This is Robert S. Strauss, the optimist, speaking:"Things are going to be worse next winter than they are today. There's no reason they should be any better. It will be terribly hard."Optimist?Mr. Strauss, the U.S. ambassador to Russia, couches his optimism in terms of expecting the very worst. But because he believes that democratic Russia can probably survive the very worst, he has faith in the future here."I expect the tolerance of people will be greater, for one thing. And I am more certain than I have ever been that they are going to make it here," Mr. Strauss said in a meeting with U.S. reporters yesterday.
NEWS
By Gavril Popov | November 7, 1991
Moscow THE CIRCUS has left town, but the clowns remain behind. That is how I would characterize the state of affairs in Russia after the failed coup and the subsequent collapse of the Communist Party structure.We are passing through a critical moment when the old system has died, but the new has yet to be born.In politics we face the odd situation of having a " democracy" without real political parties. Real democracy is based on competing political parties that can alternate power. And political parties are based primarily on the material interests of organized social groups, such as farmers, workers and entrepreneurs.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 18, 1991
MOSCOW -- The anti-Communist opposition movement Democratic Russia denounced yesterday an explosion that wrecked its headquarters Thursday night as "political terrorism," but vowed that it would not derail the campaign of Boris N. Yeltsin for the Russian presidency."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 17, 1991
MOSCOW -- A powerful explosion last night destroyed the headquarters of the Soviet Union's major anti-Communist opposition movement in what appeared to be the first political bombing in the capital in more than a decade.No one was injured in the blast, which occurred just after 10:20 p.m. in the old brick building occupied by Democratic Russia a few hundred yards from the Kremlin. One activist, Alexander Fonyakin, was in a back room at the time and leapt from a ground-floor window when the explosion occurred.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | April 3, 1991
MOSCOW -- People who wonder why Soviet reform seems stalled and why conservatives again seem on the offensive might well consider the experience at a classic Soviet industrial fortress such as Moscow's giant ZIL truck plant -- the letters stand for Factory Named for Likhachyov, one of its first directors.If Soviet politics were a prizefight, this would be the matchup:In one corner, the reigning champion: the Communist Party. Has virtually run the plant for 73 of its 75 years. Has 10,000 members among the 60,000 ZIL workers, its own three-story headquarters and a paid staff of 38 people.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 27, 1991
MOSCOW -- Moscow officials and the Democratic Russia reform movement flatly rejected yesterday the Kremlin's new ban on political demonstrations and vowed that a rally in support of Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin would go ahead tomorrow as planned.But Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, apparently determined to prevent any show of popular backing for his chief political rival, stripped the reformist Moscow leadership of control over the capital's police force. His decree put the force directly under the Soviet Ministry of Internal Affairs.
NEWS
By Gavril Popov | November 7, 1991
Moscow THE CIRCUS has left town, but the clowns remain behind. That is how I would characterize the state of affairs in Russia after the failed coup and the subsequent collapse of the Communist Party structure.We are passing through a critical moment when the old system has died, but the new has yet to be born.In politics we face the odd situation of having a " democracy" without real political parties. Real democracy is based on competing political parties that can alternate power. And political parties are based primarily on the material interests of organized social groups, such as farmers, workers and entrepreneurs.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 11, 1991
MOSCOW -- More than 100,000 Muscovites heeded democratic activists' call yesterday, pouring into the streets to denounce President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and to reject his referendum on preserving the Soviet Union.The crowds once again filled the broad square outside the Kremlin in the late-winter sunshine. They chanted their allegiance to Mr. Gorbachev's nemesis, Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, cheered striking coal miners and decried the lies and decay of Communist rule."So-called socialism Is the opium of the people," one poster paraphrased Karl Marx's dictum on religion.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 26, 1991
MOSCOW -- The Soviet government banned yesterday all political demonstrations in Moscow until mid-April to prevent backers of Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin from holding a mass rally to support him in a showdown with Communist Party conservatives this week.A government order, requested by President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, prohibited the "Let Us Defend Yeltsin" rally that had been planned for central Moscow, just outside the Kremlin, on Thursday when the Russian Congress of People's Deputies begins a special session.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 11, 1991
MOSCOW -- More than 100,000 Muscovites heeded democratic activists' call yesterday, pouring into the streets to denounce President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and to reject his referendum on preserving the Soviet Union.The crowds once again filled the broad square outside the Kremlin in the late-winter sunshine. They chanted their allegiance to Mr. Gorbachev's nemesis, Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, cheered striking coal miners and decried the lies and decay of Communist rule."So-called socialism Is the opium of the people," one poster paraphrased Karl Marx's dictum on religion.
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