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NEWS
By Mark N. Katz | June 19, 2003
PROTESTS AGAINST the Islamic Republic have been under way in Tehran and other Iranian cities for several days as demonstrators - mainly university students - demand an end to the veto that unelected clerics exercise over the country's elected president and parliament. The Bush administration dearly would love to see the Islamic Republic overthrown in a democratic revolution. But while Iran possesses some of the ingredients that were present in other countries that experienced democratic revolution in recent years, it does not have all of them - yet. Like the Philippines in 1986, South Korea in 1988, Eastern Europe in 1989 and Russia in 1991, Iran has an increasingly educated, urbanized population that has become thoroughly disillusioned with the ruling regime.
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NEWS
By Mark N. Katz | June 19, 2003
PROTESTS AGAINST the Islamic Republic have been under way in Tehran and other Iranian cities for several days as demonstrators - mainly university students - demand an end to the veto that unelected clerics exercise over the country's elected president and parliament. The Bush administration dearly would love to see the Islamic Republic overthrown in a democratic revolution. But while Iran possesses some of the ingredients that were present in other countries that experienced democratic revolution in recent years, it does not have all of them - yet. Like the Philippines in 1986, South Korea in 1988, Eastern Europe in 1989 and Russia in 1991, Iran has an increasingly educated, urbanized population that has become thoroughly disillusioned with the ruling regime.
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NEWS
November 30, 2000
ON THE EVE of Vicente Fox's inauguration as president of Mexico, that nation's tomorrow promises hope and new beginnings. He is a breath of fresh air after 71 years of one-party rule. He offers radical possibilities but also new responsibilities. Mr. Fox is a former Coca-Cola executive who crusaded for power leading the National Action Party (PAN), which was in origin the Catholic Church party but is now the party of business. He reached beyond PAN in his Cabinet appointments and promises to improve the life and opportunities of the poor.
NEWS
November 30, 2000
ON THE EVE of Vicente Fox's inauguration as president of Mexico, that nation's tomorrow promises hope and new beginnings. He is a breath of fresh air after 71 years of one-party rule. He offers radical possibilities but also new responsibilities. Mr. Fox is a former Coca-Cola executive who crusaded for power leading the National Action Party (PAN), which was in origin the Catholic Church party but is now the party of business. He reached beyond PAN in his Cabinet appointments and promises to improve the life and opportunities of the poor.
NEWS
July 8, 1997
THE ELECTION Sunday made Mexico a more acceptable neighbor and partner in the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Though midterm, it was the most important this century because it divided power and was respected.It vindicated President Ernesto Zedillo, whose Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) took a drubbing. He had established a Federal Electoral Institute to run a fair election. A one-party monopoly of power has given way without violence to the wishes of the people.For the Chamber of Deputies, the lower house of the legislature, PRI came in first but short of a majority.
NEWS
September 3, 1997
THE MEXICAN Congress passed its first test for multi-party democracy on Monday when the ruling Party of Revolutionary Institutions (PRI) took part as a minority even though it has the most seats of any one party. It was on the verge of holding its own rump session, threatening political chaos, when President Ernesto Zedillo convinced his followers to play the game by the rules.A four-party coalition built on the right-wing National Action Party (PAN) and left-wing Party of Democratic Revolution (PRD)
NEWS
February 9, 1995
Poland's President Lech Walesa, the shipyard electrician who played an epic role in forcing the collapse of European communism, is now engaged in a brutal struggle to remain in power.His adversaries are many: apparatchiks from the old order who won control of the government last year as "Social Democrats" eager to exploit economic unrest; former allies in the Solidarity movement alienated by his arbitrary ways, and managers of big enterprises who seem to flourish corruptly under communism or capitalism.
NEWS
By Joe Patrick Bean | September 6, 1991
HOW I envy my freshmen!As these young college students, most of them 17 or 18 years old, arrived on campus for a week of orientation activities, Soviet reactionaries were attempting to overthrow President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and halt political and economic reform.By the time my freshmen began classes a week later, they had watched that putsch fail ingloriously. They had seen it unwittingly mobilize a popular desire for freedom so contagious that it could no longer be suppressed. They had witnessed a democratic revolution that loosed a great nation from communism's dying grasp.
NEWS
August 17, 1994
For Americans as well as Mexicans, Sunday's elections in our neighbor beyond the Rio Grande can be described without hyperbole as the most important of the century. Sixty-five years of uninterrupted rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party -- the famous PRI -- are likely to be extended with a victory for Ernesto Zedillo, a 42-year-old U.S.-educated technocrat who is a disciple of incumbent President Carlos Salinas. But under what circumstances? And with what impact on Mexico's democracy, economy and relationship with the United States?
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 21, 1999
MEXICO CITY -- The scramble for Mexico's presidency in 2000 has become a true horse race, with the early favorite, Mexico City's leftist Mayor Cuauhtemoc Cardenas, slipping into a virtual tie with a conservative competitor in a well-regarded opinion poll.Cardenas had been given the best chance of becoming Mexico's first president from outside the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI in Spanish) since 1927. But the mayor is burdened by perceptions that he has not delivered on a pledge to tame crime in this sprawling metropolis.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 2000
TANTOYUCA, Mexico - Banners flutter from an outdoor stage as a sound system introduces Cuauhtemoc Cardenas, candidate for president. One speaker after another lauds him and promises to support him. As each finishes, a brass band explodes in tune. On stage, Cardenas seems oblivious to it all. He stands staring sternly out above the crowd and into the distance, his arms folded in front of him. When he finally takes the microphone, his voice rarely varies in tone. He speaks of the harm done by "neoliberal policies" and of the government selling out Mexico to "foreign interests."
NEWS
By Riordan Roett | May 30, 2000
REGARDLESS of the result, the July 2 national election will be an important turning point in Mexico's history. After decades of one-party government, this year's election will be the most transparent since the founding of the current political system under the 1917 constitution. The long-dominant Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) has established a set of procedures designed to guarantee that the outcome of the balloting is respected. While there is some skepticism on the part of the two major opposition parties, the National Action Party (PAN)
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 21, 1999
MEXICO CITY -- The scramble for Mexico's presidency in 2000 has become a true horse race, with the early favorite, Mexico City's leftist Mayor Cuauhtemoc Cardenas, slipping into a virtual tie with a conservative competitor in a well-regarded opinion poll.Cardenas had been given the best chance of becoming Mexico's first president from outside the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI in Spanish) since 1927. But the mayor is burdened by perceptions that he has not delivered on a pledge to tame crime in this sprawling metropolis.
NEWS
September 3, 1997
THE MEXICAN Congress passed its first test for multi-party democracy on Monday when the ruling Party of Revolutionary Institutions (PRI) took part as a minority even though it has the most seats of any one party. It was on the verge of holding its own rump session, threatening political chaos, when President Ernesto Zedillo convinced his followers to play the game by the rules.A four-party coalition built on the right-wing National Action Party (PAN) and left-wing Party of Democratic Revolution (PRD)
NEWS
July 8, 1997
THE ELECTION Sunday made Mexico a more acceptable neighbor and partner in the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Though midterm, it was the most important this century because it divided power and was respected.It vindicated President Ernesto Zedillo, whose Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) took a drubbing. He had established a Federal Electoral Institute to run a fair election. A one-party monopoly of power has given way without violence to the wishes of the people.For the Chamber of Deputies, the lower house of the legislature, PRI came in first but short of a majority.
NEWS
February 9, 1995
Poland's President Lech Walesa, the shipyard electrician who played an epic role in forcing the collapse of European communism, is now engaged in a brutal struggle to remain in power.His adversaries are many: apparatchiks from the old order who won control of the government last year as "Social Democrats" eager to exploit economic unrest; former allies in the Solidarity movement alienated by his arbitrary ways, and managers of big enterprises who seem to flourish corruptly under communism or capitalism.
NEWS
By Riordan Roett | May 30, 2000
REGARDLESS of the result, the July 2 national election will be an important turning point in Mexico's history. After decades of one-party government, this year's election will be the most transparent since the founding of the current political system under the 1917 constitution. The long-dominant Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) has established a set of procedures designed to guarantee that the outcome of the balloting is respected. While there is some skepticism on the part of the two major opposition parties, the National Action Party (PAN)
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 2000
TANTOYUCA, Mexico - Banners flutter from an outdoor stage as a sound system introduces Cuauhtemoc Cardenas, candidate for president. One speaker after another lauds him and promises to support him. As each finishes, a brass band explodes in tune. On stage, Cardenas seems oblivious to it all. He stands staring sternly out above the crowd and into the distance, his arms folded in front of him. When he finally takes the microphone, his voice rarely varies in tone. He speaks of the harm done by "neoliberal policies" and of the government selling out Mexico to "foreign interests."
NEWS
August 17, 1994
For Americans as well as Mexicans, Sunday's elections in our neighbor beyond the Rio Grande can be described without hyperbole as the most important of the century. Sixty-five years of uninterrupted rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party -- the famous PRI -- are likely to be extended with a victory for Ernesto Zedillo, a 42-year-old U.S.-educated technocrat who is a disciple of incumbent President Carlos Salinas. But under what circumstances? And with what impact on Mexico's democracy, economy and relationship with the United States?
NEWS
By Joe Patrick Bean | September 6, 1991
HOW I envy my freshmen!As these young college students, most of them 17 or 18 years old, arrived on campus for a week of orientation activities, Soviet reactionaries were attempting to overthrow President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and halt political and economic reform.By the time my freshmen began classes a week later, they had watched that putsch fail ingloriously. They had seen it unwittingly mobilize a popular desire for freedom so contagious that it could no longer be suppressed. They had witnessed a democratic revolution that loosed a great nation from communism's dying grasp.
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