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NEWS
June 10, 2013
Your editorial about phone record surveillance was certainly thought-provoking ("Surveillance state," June 7). What is of most concern about our government is the top-secret court that, we now know, actually exists. Where in a democratic republic is there justification for any top-secret court? Joy Shillman, Baltimore
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NEWS
June 10, 2013
Your editorial about phone record surveillance was certainly thought-provoking ("Surveillance state," June 7). What is of most concern about our government is the top-secret court that, we now know, actually exists. Where in a democratic republic is there justification for any top-secret court? Joy Shillman, Baltimore
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | May 21, 1997
The Democratic Republic of Congo is not The Republic of the Congo and never was. Laurent Kabila does not know how to govern, in contrast to the monsters who do. Bomber pilot Kelly Flinn acted like a flyboy off duty and must be drummed out of the Force. The only thing dopier than giving China most-favored- nation trading status would be not. Pub Date: 5/21/97
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 25, 2007
UNICEF permitted interviews with the children in this story only on condition that their real names not be used since they remain at risk of being targeted by militant groups. BUKAVU, Democratic Republic of the Congo -- The day his childhood ended, he was a 12-year-old boy playing cards with friends in his village. Then five gun-toting men appeared. As horrified parents looked on, the men marched the crying, barefoot boys single file into the world of child soldiering. Hers ended when she was just 10. Marauding soldiers had killed her uncle and scores of others in her village; they were looting and, she says, "doing everything."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 22, 2000
Four foreign journalists who faced danger and punishment in getting out the news of events in their countries were honored last night at the 10th annual International Press Freedom Awards in New York. The awards were presented to journalists from Bosnia-Herzegovina, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Malaysia and Iran at a dinner sponsored by the Committee to Protect Journalists. The winners include Zeljko Kopanja, co-founder and editor of Nezavisne Novine, the largest independent Serb daily in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,Los Angeles Times | October 29, 2006
KINSHASA, Democratic Republic of the Congo -- Anxious Congolese were to return to the polls this morning to complete the first democratic presidential election in more than 40 years. But fears of renewed violence in this Central African country largely overshadowed the hope and optimism many people expressed during the first round of voting. Thousands began lining up at 50,000 polling stations nationwide early today, just as they did July 30 for the first round, which ended without any of 33 presidential contenders garnering the required 50 percent of ballots.
NEWS
By MAGGIE FARLEY and MAGGIE FARLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 24, 2006
KINSHASA, Democratic Republic of the Congo -- In a neighborhood where half-clad toddlers play in streets filled with garbage, Therese Olenga Kalonda stood in front of the crowd of Sunday churchgoers and told them how to change their lot. "You have a vote, and it is free, and it is secret," she told families who came to worship at a tin-roofed church. "If the person you vote in doesn't keep their promises, you can vote them out." It was a basic lesson from Madame Therese, as she is known, a prominent women's rights activist running for parliament in Congo's elections Sunday.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2001
Dr. Bill Clemmer, an American Baptist missionary working in the Congo, travels however he can to remote health clinics throughout a vast African country of 50 million people. He often risks his life to deliver medical supplies, sometimes by plane, river boat or utility vehicle. On a recent trip up the Congo River in a dugout canoe, he arrived at a village of more than 2,000 residents who are 10 hours from the nearest hospital. They rely on a small clinic for maternity, pediatric and adult health care.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2001
Dr. Bill Clemmer, an American Baptist missionary working in the Congo,travels however he can to remote health clinics throughout a vast African country of 50 million people. He often risks his life to deliver medical supplies, sometimes by plane, river boat or utility vehicle. On a recent trip up the Congo River in a dugout canoe, he arrived at a village of more than 2,000 residents who are 10 hours from the nearest hospital. They rely on a small clinic for maternity, pediatric and adult health care.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 25, 2007
UNICEF permitted interviews with the children in this story only on condition that their real names not be used since they remain at risk of being targeted by militant groups. BUKAVU, Democratic Republic of the Congo -- The day his childhood ended, he was a 12-year-old boy playing cards with friends in his village. Then five gun-toting men appeared. As horrified parents looked on, the men marched the crying, barefoot boys single file into the world of child soldiering. Hers ended when she was just 10. Marauding soldiers had killed her uncle and scores of others in her village; they were looting and, she says, "doing everything."
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,Los Angeles Times | October 29, 2006
KINSHASA, Democratic Republic of the Congo -- Anxious Congolese were to return to the polls this morning to complete the first democratic presidential election in more than 40 years. But fears of renewed violence in this Central African country largely overshadowed the hope and optimism many people expressed during the first round of voting. Thousands began lining up at 50,000 polling stations nationwide early today, just as they did July 30 for the first round, which ended without any of 33 presidential contenders garnering the required 50 percent of ballots.
NEWS
By MAGGIE FARLEY and MAGGIE FARLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 24, 2006
KINSHASA, Democratic Republic of the Congo -- In a neighborhood where half-clad toddlers play in streets filled with garbage, Therese Olenga Kalonda stood in front of the crowd of Sunday churchgoers and told them how to change their lot. "You have a vote, and it is free, and it is secret," she told families who came to worship at a tin-roofed church. "If the person you vote in doesn't keep their promises, you can vote them out." It was a basic lesson from Madame Therese, as she is known, a prominent women's rights activist running for parliament in Congo's elections Sunday.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2001
Dr. Bill Clemmer, an American Baptist missionary working in the Congo, travels however he can to remote health clinics throughout a vast African country of 50 million people. He often risks his life to deliver medical supplies, sometimes by plane, river boat or utility vehicle. On a recent trip up the Congo River in a dugout canoe, he arrived at a village of more than 2,000 residents who are 10 hours from the nearest hospital. They rely on a small clinic for maternity, pediatric and adult health care.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2001
Dr. Bill Clemmer, an American Baptist missionary working in the Congo,travels however he can to remote health clinics throughout a vast African country of 50 million people. He often risks his life to deliver medical supplies, sometimes by plane, river boat or utility vehicle. On a recent trip up the Congo River in a dugout canoe, he arrived at a village of more than 2,000 residents who are 10 hours from the nearest hospital. They rely on a small clinic for maternity, pediatric and adult health care.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 22, 2000
Four foreign journalists who faced danger and punishment in getting out the news of events in their countries were honored last night at the 10th annual International Press Freedom Awards in New York. The awards were presented to journalists from Bosnia-Herzegovina, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Malaysia and Iran at a dinner sponsored by the Committee to Protect Journalists. The winners include Zeljko Kopanja, co-founder and editor of Nezavisne Novine, the largest independent Serb daily in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | May 21, 1997
The Democratic Republic of Congo is not The Republic of the Congo and never was. Laurent Kabila does not know how to govern, in contrast to the monsters who do. Bomber pilot Kelly Flinn acted like a flyboy off duty and must be drummed out of the Force. The only thing dopier than giving China most-favored- nation trading status would be not. Pub Date: 5/21/97
FEATURES
May 1, 2006
May 1--1786: Mozart's opera The Marriage of Figaro premiered in Vienna, Austria. 1931: New York's Empire State Building was dedicated. 1948: The People's Democratic Republic of Korea (North Korea) was proclaimed. 1971: Amtrak - which combined 18 intercity passenger railroads - went into service.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Kabatwa, a silverback mountain gorilla, carries her twins in the Virunga Mountains, just outside Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda . The babies were born in February. According to a 2010 census, the total number of mountain gorillas has increased by a quarter over the past seven years to reach more than 780 individuals. Two-thirds of them are found in the Virunga chain that straddles Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. They were brought to the world's attention primatologist Dian Fossey.
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