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NEWS
September 2, 1994
Maryland's congressional delegation, like the state itself, is a study in diversity. We elect some of the nation's most liberal members of Congress -- and some of the most conservative. Republican or Democrat, urban or rural, male or female, they all play a pivotal role in promoting the interests of state residents and businesses.The Sun has already endorsed candidates in Districts 2 and 6. The following are recommendations in the state's remaining six districts:* First District Republican Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest faces three weak opponents.
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NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2010
For more than a year, Republicans have been carefully plotting the ouster of Rep. Frank Kratovil of Maryland, one of the most vulnerable Democrats in the country. Party strategists never expected to contend with Rob Fisher, however. An upstart candidate with an outsider message, the conservative businessman has emerged from obscurity, thanks to the most extensive TV ad drive of any Marylander running for Congress. "We need to change what's happening Washington," Fisher said in an interview.
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NEWS
September 17, 1990
A: The ballot box Maryland's eight incumbent members of the House of Representatives, six Democrats and two Republicans, easily won their party's primaries Tuesday with only Rep. Roy Dyson, the 1st District Democrat, overcoming a major threat.Besides Dyson, who beat Del. Barbara O. Kreamer, D-Harfordfor the right to face Republican Wayne T. Gilchrest in November, the winners were: 2nd District -- Republican Rep. Helen D.Bentley and Democrat Ronald P. Bowers. 3rd District -- Democratic Rep. Benjamin Cardin and Republican Frederic M. Parker.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | September 30, 2008
Washington - Rep. Elijah E. Cummings wanted more help for homeowners facing foreclosure. Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett didn't want to reward the "bad behavior" of irrational lenders and borrowers. From opposite ends of the political spectrum, the two Marylanders reflected the range of opposition to the $700 billion financial bailout package rejected yesterday by lawmakers. "The thing that bothers me more than anything else about this deal is the imbalance," said Cummings, a liberal Democrat from Baltimore.
NEWS
By Peter Kumpa and Peter Kumpa,Evening Sun Staff | November 7, 1990
Maryland voters found only one congressional "rascal" to throw out of office, five-term Democratic Rep. Roy Dyson. The state's remaining seven representatives -- five Democrats and two Republicans -- won their re-election bids by comfortable margins, showing that voters might not like Congress as an institution but had faith in their own congressmen.Wayne T. Gilchrest, the Kennedyville Republican, ran away from Dyson, sweeping most of the Eastern Shore and Harford County. His margin of victory was 56 to 44 percent, some 20,000 votes over the Democrat.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The House yesterday took its first solemn step down a road that could lead to the impeachment of President Clinton by voting overwhelmingly to release immediately to the public independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's report on the president's sex scandal.The weight of the historic vote hung heavily on representatives, especially Democrats, who are deeply divided between impulses political self-preservation and their duty to uphold a Constitution that gives them the sole authority to launch impeachment proceedings.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 14, 2001
WASHINGTON -- A year to the day after the Supreme Court settled the presidential election of 2000 and created a partisan firestorm in the country, Democratic and Republican congressmen alike dutifully trudged to the microphone on the House floor on Wednesday and accepted the possible. Often in precisely the same words, they reminded each other not to "let the perfect be the enemy of the good" by voting against the bipartisan election reform bill before them that was "less than perfect."
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | February 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Members of Maryland's congressional delegation said yesterday that they have avoided the kinds of problems that torpedoed the nominations of Zoe Baird and Judge Kimba M. Wood for attorney general by always paying Social Security taxes and never hiring illegal aliens.A survey of the state's eight representatives and two senators found none who reported violating the laws regarding the employment of undocumented workers and payment of taxes for household workers. Most answered through their press secretaries or other aides.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Sun National Staff | June 17, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett of Western Maryland remains the wealthiest Marylander in Congress with assets valued between $1.7 million and $6.5 million, according to annual financial disclosure reports released yesterday. With Congress increasingly populated by millionaires, Maryland's congressional delegation of eight House members and two senators is decidedly middle-class. Only Bartlett, a six-term Republican, and Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, a Baltimore Democrat with assets valued between $1.3 million and $3.3 million, can be classified definitely as millionaires.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,SUN REPORTER | December 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Members of Maryland's congressional delegation welcomed the report of the Iraq Study Group, with Democrats saying yesterday that its conclusions about bolstering diplomatic efforts and beginning to redeploy troops echo what they have been saying for months. "It is clear, now, that there is no one in America, save perhaps the president, who believes that staying the course is a viable policy," said Rep. Steny H. Hoyer of Southern Maryland, the House Democratic leader-elect.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,SUN REPORTER | December 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Members of Maryland's congressional delegation welcomed the report of the Iraq Study Group, with Democrats saying yesterday that its conclusions about bolstering diplomatic efforts and beginning to redeploy troops echo what they have been saying for months. "It is clear, now, that there is no one in America, save perhaps the president, who believes that staying the course is a viable policy," said Rep. Steny H. Hoyer of Southern Maryland, the House Democratic leader-elect.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Joel Havemann and Richard Simon and Joel Havemann,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The ousted Republican-led Congress returns to the Capitol this week to try one last time to shorten a long legislative to-do list, while the just-elected members will vote for new leaders in races that could signal the direction the parties will take next year. The lame-duck session mixes a dispirited Republican Party and a Democratic Party that knows it will soon have the upper hand in both houses -- a potentially combustible cocktail. At minimum, Congress must pass a temporary spending bill to keep the government running until the next Congress takes office.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Reporter | November 6, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The most expensive midterm campaign ever -- and one of the nastiest -- wraps up today with Democrats positioned to end 12 years of Republican control of the House and possibly take the Senate as well, according to independent analysts and politicians in both parties. Projections of Democratic gains range from 20 to 40 House seats, more than the 15 needed to erase the Republican majority. Senate control will likely be determined in four tossup states. National polling in the final days of the campaign showed an uptick for Republicans.
NEWS
By Jim Jaffe | October 31, 2006
What can we expect from the next Congress? Despite the lack of a public blueprint comparable to Newt Gingrich's 1994 "Contract with America," there are some reliable signals. It promises to be a dramatic environment characterized by more heat than light, one in which politics consistently trumps policy. Don't bet on bipartisan agreements to slash the deficit or reform Medicare. Let's assume that the conventional wisdom is correct: The House will have a modest Democratic majority and the Senate will be nearly evenly balanced.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Reporter | October 25, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Less than two weeks before the midterm elections, the Republican majority in the Senate is very much in jeopardy but new polling suggests that Democrats may fall just short of gaining control. A new series of polls in five battleground states, conducted for the Los Angeles Times and Bloomberg News, shows that strong support from rural voters has put Republicans in a slightly better position to win two of three Southern or border states - Virginia, Tennessee and Missouri - where the fight for the Senate could well be decided.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 3, 2005
WASHINGTON - Rep. Robert T. Matsui of California, a World War II internee who rose to become one of the top Asian-Americans in Congress during 26 years of service, died late Saturday, his office announced yesterday. He was 63. One of the Democratic Party's leading spokesmen on tax and Social Security issues, Mr. Matsui was hospitalized at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda on Dec. 24, suffering from pneumonia. His office said myelodysplastic syndrome, a rare bone marrow disease that compromises the body's ability to fight infection, had been diagnosed several months before.
NEWS
By FRED BARNES | November 2, 1994
Austin, Texas. -- To understand the extraordinary impact of Newt Gingrich on the Republican party, you only have to check out the GOP candidates for open or Democratic House seats this fall.In the late 1970s and 1980s, the model for aspiring Republican representatives was Jack Kemp. Now Mr. Gingrich is the model. He has a positive message, but he's also tough, partisan, impatient and a high-energy foe of everything liberal. ''Bomb-thrower is a word you often hear,'' says Dan Leonard of the National Republican Congressional Committee.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and Nelson Schwartz and John B. O'Donnell and Nelson Schwartz,Washington Bureau | January 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Democrats in the Maryland congressional delegation lavished praise on President Clinton's speech while Republicans wondered how the ambitious agenda would be financed and criticized his threat to veto health care legislation."
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Sun National Staff | June 17, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett of Western Maryland remains the wealthiest Marylander in Congress with assets valued between $1.7 million and $6.5 million, according to annual financial disclosure reports released yesterday. With Congress increasingly populated by millionaires, Maryland's congressional delegation of eight House members and two senators is decidedly middle-class. Only Bartlett, a six-term Republican, and Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, a Baltimore Democrat with assets valued between $1.3 million and $3.3 million, can be classified definitely as millionaires.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | July 24, 2002
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Questions are being raised by Democrats and the big media (but I repeat myself) about Dick Cheney's large profit from the sale of Halliburton stock options in August 2000. Mr. Cheney divested himself of Halliburton shares as he left the energy company to run for vice president. The fact that editorials in The New York Times and other papers called on Mr. Cheney to sell his stock to avoid any appearance of a conflict of interest apparently has been forgotten. The suggestion now is that Mr. Cheney did something wrong.
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