Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDemocratic President
IN THE NEWS

Democratic President

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Dan Berger | February 2, 1996
The only thing voters in Oregon like less than the Democratic president is the Republican Congress. Maybe else- where, too.Steve Forbes is a side dish the conventional candidates never ordered.The interest-rate reduction is a reminder that the Democratic president gets re-elected only if Republican Fed members keep him out of recession.Most of the insiders who deny having written ''Primary Colors'' cannot stand not being suspected.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
President Barack Obama told donors in Maryland on Monday that this November's midterm election will be "critical" if Democrats hope to increase the federal minimum wage or approve major changes to U.S. immigration laws during his final years in office. Speaking at a fundraiser held at the home of a Potomac physician, the president argued that Republicans in the House of Representatives have become caught in an "endless loop" over issues such as the health care law and the 2012 attack in Benghazi, Libya, that killed four Americans.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 26, 1995
President Clinton had every right to boast Tuesday night that the state of the Union is good. The country is at peace. The economy has added almost six million new jobs since he became president, and has the lowest combined rate of unemployment and inflation in 25 years. Businesses are more productive, and the administration has succeeded in beginning to reduce the deficit.But that is not the true state of the Union in January 1995, and the president knows it. The true state of the Union is one of dissatisfaction with the status quo and a strong desire for change.
NEWS
July 6, 2010
Republican National Chairman Michael S. Steele's recent comments regarding President Barack Obama's ownership of the war in Afghanistan were made notable by his own party's overwhelmingly negative reaction to them. Certainly this was not the first time Mr. Steele stuck his foot in his mouth. Google his name and the word "gaffe," and there are 121,000 hits. That's a big number — not Joe Biden big, but large by party chairman standards. What Maryland's former lieutenant governor did was what members of his party have been doing since Mr. Obama was elected.
NEWS
January 26, 1995
President Clinton had every right to boast Tuesday night that "record numbers of Americans are succeeding in the new global economy. We are at peace, and we are a force for peace and freedom throughout the world. We have [added] almost six million new jobs since I became president, and we have the lowest combined rate of unemployment and inflation in 25 years. Our businesses are more productive, and here we have worked to bring down the deficit, to expand trade, to put more police on our streets, to give our citizens more of the tools they need to get an education and to rebuild their own communities."
TOPIC
By ROBERT l. BOROSAGE | October 17, 1999
CONGRESS HAS failed once more to pass a budget. So its Republican leaders are headed into another high-stakes showdown with the president. Think of it as "budgetmania," an offshoot of "Wrestlemania": House Speaker Dennis "Dandy Denny" Hastert, an Illinois Republican, teams up with Majority Whip Tom "The Hammer" DeLay, a Texas Republican, to take on President Bill "Slick Willy" Clinton, the defending champion.At stake, a $500 billion purse, give or take a few billion. Smoke, mirrors, posturing, lots of disguises, villains and heroes.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN Jr | January 17, 1993
This week a rare alignment of the national legislative and executive planets will occur in Washington: A Democratic Congress will welcome a newly elected and new Democratic president to town.This happened only four previous times in this century. It hasn't happened since 1977.Some political commentators believe -- and many more Democrats hope -- that the alignment will be a fortuitous one. Maybe not the dawning of a new Age of Aquarius, exactly, but at least a new relationship between Congress and president that will not in any way resemble the past four years, especially the last year.
NEWS
November 18, 1993
Only days ago, the chances looked slim that President Clinton could avoid a debilitating defeat on the North American Free Trade Agreement. But with his victory in the House last night, he wrote a new chapter in the "comeback kid" saga that has marked his political career.NAFTA, an agreement originally negotiated by a Republican president and vehemently opposed by major Democratic constituencies, was a curious issue for a Democratic president to bill as a "make-or-break" vote for his presidency.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | November 5, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The immediate assumption in the wake of Bill Clinton's sweeping electoral-vote triumph is that the congressional gridlock about which President Bush so mournfully complained in his losing effort has been broken.Much depends, however, on what the new president asks for, and how he goes about asking.The previous Democratic president -- Jimmy Carter in 1977 -- also came in with a Democratic-controlled Congress but he alienated its leaders and members almost at once by rejecting their pork-barrel bid for new water projects, thus setting a tone of confrontation from which he never fully recovered.
NEWS
By JILL ZUCKMAN and JILL ZUCKMAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 25, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The nomination of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court moved to the Senate yesterday with a party-line vote in the Judiciary Committee that foreshadows a rocky election year in which Democrats and Republicans are expected to angrily part ways on judicial nominations and a range of other issues. All 10 Republicans on the committee voted for Alito, calling him a superb judge whose 15 years as a federal appeals court judge makes him more experienced than most Supreme Court nominees.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun Reporter | February 10, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Should the next president sit down with the leaders of Iran, or North Korea, just to chat? Around that question revolves one of the few national security disagreements between Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama as they struggle to define themselves in advance of Tuesday's Democratic primaries in Maryland and elsewhere. On other issues - the war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, defense spending - it's difficult to see much daylight between the two. Both say they would, as president, accelerate the troop withdrawals from Iraq.
NEWS
By Mark Z. Barabak and Mark Z. Barabak,Los Angeles Times | January 12, 2007
Sen. Christopher J. Dodd of Connecticut joined a growing field of Democratic presidential contenders yesterday, using a radio call-in show to call attention to the value of his Washington experience at a time of heightened anxieties at home and abroad. "I know how to do this. I know what has to be done," Dodd said, while acknowledging that his candidacy is a long shot. Dodd conceded his 30-plus years in Congress might be seen as a liability among voters hungry for change. "But I think people this time around believe experience matters," he said.
NEWS
By Mark Silva and Mark Silva,Chicago Tribune | January 6, 2007
WASHINGTON -- With President Bush just days from announcing "a new way forward" in Iraq, the incoming Democratic congressional leaders emphatically urged the president yesterday to reject the surge of additional U.S. military forces that the White House is considering. The president, who plans to address the nation next week about a new war strategy, has not made a final decision about any new deployment of U.S. forces, according to the White House. Yet he has spoken with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki about the importance of "sufficient force" to restore order in Baghdad.
NEWS
By JILL ZUCKMAN and JILL ZUCKMAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 25, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The nomination of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court moved to the Senate yesterday with a party-line vote in the Judiciary Committee that foreshadows a rocky election year in which Democrats and Republicans are expected to angrily part ways on judicial nominations and a range of other issues. All 10 Republicans on the committee voted for Alito, calling him a superb judge whose 15 years as a federal appeals court judge makes him more experienced than most Supreme Court nominees.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 7, 2004
RACINE, W.Va. - Sen. John Kerry, battling a slide in the polls, unleashed a torrent of criticism against President Bush yesterday, telling mineworkers at a Labor Day rally in this swing state that the W in Bush's name stands for "wrong." "Wrong choices, wrong judgment, wrong priorities, wrong direction for our country," Kerry told supporters, his voice echoing through a sun-soaked valley in the heart of coal country. "The choice in this race is very simple, West Virginia. It's very simple, America.
NEWS
By Maria L. La Ganga and Maria L. La Ganga,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 28, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Democrat John F. Kerry charged yesterday that President Bush sent troops to war unprepared and pursued policies that have undermined the U.S. military and the nation's safety - one of his harshest attacks yet on Bush's national security credentials. In an address at the University of California, Los Angeles days before the California primary, the front-runner for his party's presidential nomination derided what he termed the administration's "armchair hawks." He said, "George Bush inherited the strongest military in the world.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | November 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- There is nothing surprising about the sudden spate of conversation here about whether President Clinton may be confronted with a challenge for the Democratic nomination in 1996. Even as the votes were counted there was pervasive speculation within the political community about who might run against him.That is a price any president can expect to pay when his party suffers such a thorough shellacking -- and the president himself is seen as a prime cause of the disaster.The conventional wisdom in these cases is that such a primary challenge is probably doomed to failure simply because any president has several resources at his disposal.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Democrats came not to bury President Bush, but to honor him.And so, with their Republican colleagues, they prepared yesterday for the president's victory speech before a joint session of Congress, an honor extended to Mr. Bush by the very Democratic leaders who had opposed the use of allied force against Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's legions."
TOPIC
By THE NATIONAL REVIEW | November 17, 2002
THERE HAVE BEEN three national elections in the modern era in which conservatives made massive gains. In 1980, a conservative won the presidency. In 1994, conservatives became a majority of the party that controlled Congress. The 2002 election is another such advance. It is more surprising, and in that sense more impressive, than the others were. Conservatives were likely to do well in 1994, if not quite as well as they did, since a Democratic president was in office. In 1980, Ronald Reagan had a stagflationary economy to run against.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 31, 2002
WASHINGTON - On a fund-raising blitz last week, President Bush spoke to Republican donors at lunches in South Carolina and Texas and at a dinner in Georgia. All told, the Republican Party raked in $4 million, thanks to its biggest money magnet - the man who sits in the White House. As Bush made his swing through three states in two days, he urged police and firefighters to be ready for a terrorist attack, spoke of the importance of homeland security and talked about the success of the war in Afghanistan - sometimes in the same breath as he asked people to vote Republican.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.