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By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | July 8, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Frustrated by their failure to revive the president's popularity, Bush campaign strategists are exploiting the powers of incumbency to try to slow down the momentum of his most worrisome rival of the moment, Bill Clinton.Yesterday, Education Secretary Lamar Alexander became the fourth top-ranking administration official in recent months to deliver a quick counteroffensive to a major policy speech by the soon-to-be Democratic nominee.At a news conference sponsored by the Bush-Quayle campaign, the Bush Cabinet member accused Mr. Clinton of kowtowing to teachers' union "bosses."
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NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown has raised nearly $12 million in his bid for governor, the Democratic front-runner announced Monday. The final campaign finance report before the June 24 primary election is due Friday, but Brown's camp released its total tally early and touted collecting "over $800,000" in the past two and a half weeks.  The $12 million sum exceeds the $10 million Gov. Martin O'Malley spent in 2010 on his re-election campaign. Brown's tally includes cash raised by his running mate, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman.
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NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | May 23, 1992
With so many voters dissatisfied with the choices in the presidential race, why should Gov. William Donald Schaefer be any different?"What about H. Ross Perot?" Mr. Schaefer was asked yesterday after ceremonies honoring graduates of the University of Maryland School of Social Work."He's a danger," Mr. Schaefer said."My problem with Ross Perot is he has never ever had any experience in government."And success as a business executive "is not the same," Mr. Schaefer said. "He's going to come in and go to Congress and try to talk to them and he's going to walk right into a wall."
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON | June 15, 2008
Barack Obama won Howard County's Democratic presidential primary by a solid 9,000 votes and 19 percentage points over Hillary Clinton, and local party leaders don't believe unity will be a problem as they look toward November's general election. Party chairman Michael C.A. McPherson is busy advertising a central Maryland Democratic unity rally July 12 at Banneker Park and Museum in Oella, just across the Patapsco River from Ellicott City. And he's recruiting volunteers for a neighborhood effort to produce more voters on Election Day. Attending a campaign picnic for County Executive Ken Ulman at the Circle D Farm in Glenwood last week, McPherson said the challenge for Democrats is maintaining their enthusiasm now that the Obama-Clinton contest has ended.
NEWS
By Tom De Luca | April 30, 2008
Sen. Hillary Clinton's win in Pennsylvania's Democratic primary underscores the need for the Democratic Party to bring the nomination battle to a swift and fair conclusion as soon as possible. The best way to do that is to move the Democratic nominating convention from the end of August to the end of June. Why? When Democrats vote in Indiana and North Carolina on Tuesday, they will probably render a split decision, with Sen. Barack Obama handily winning in the South and Mrs. Clinton eking out an industrial Midwest victory.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown has raised nearly $12 million in his bid for governor, the Democratic front-runner announced Monday. The final campaign finance report before the June 24 primary election is due Friday, but Brown's camp released its total tally early and touted collecting "over $800,000" in the past two and a half weeks.  The $12 million sum exceeds the $10 million Gov. Martin O'Malley spent in 2010 on his re-election campaign. Brown's tally includes cash raised by his running mate, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Staff Writer | June 23, 1992
HOUSTON -- Cheered on by a claque of big-city mayors, Gov. Bill Clinton has seized the political offensive for the first time in at least three months with his new game plan for reviving the economy.Just three weeks before the national convention at which he will become the Democratic nominee for president, the Arkansas governor has taken an initiative that offers a sharp contrast with the silence on key issues of President Bush and independent candidate Ross Perot.Mr. Clinton's appearance before the 60th annual meeting of the U.S. Conference of Mayors evoked an outpouring of support from Democratic mayors that, although predictable, gave at least the appearance of momentum to a campaign that had been struggling for attention ever since Mr. Perot burst onto the national stage in March.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 31, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Democrats already planning for their 2004 national convention are in a tizzy over an astute maneuver by the Republicans that could smother their message at the time they are laboring to give their next presidential nominee the best possible introduction to American voters. What has the Democrats chagrined is the Republican Party's decision to hold its national convention from the last two days in August 2004 through the first two days of September -- six weeks after the Democrats' tentative convention dates in mid-July.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | July 19, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Perhaps the most mind-boggling political line of the month is the one taken by Vice President Al Gore in Iowa last week. Democratic activists, he said, should make a decision now on a nominee so he can begin the campaign against Gov. George W. Bush of Texas, the richly endowed Republican front-runner.In a meeting in Des Moines, Iowa, Mr. Gore told his listeners they had the power to "determine in short order the Democratic nominee for president and begin the real battle" against the Republicans.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | October 18, 2000
AVON BEND, W.Va. - If you live in West Virginia, you may answer your telephone to find Barbara Bush on the line. Her recorded message assures you that all those things they are saying about her son George W. Bush are not true and that he will indeed protect everyone's Social Security benefits. There is, of course, nothing remarkable about using telephone recordings in campaigns, even if a former first lady and mother of a candidate is not the usual caller. But the fact that these Republican calls are being made in West Virginia this late in the game speaks volumes about this election campaign.
NEWS
By Tom De Luca | April 30, 2008
Sen. Hillary Clinton's win in Pennsylvania's Democratic primary underscores the need for the Democratic Party to bring the nomination battle to a swift and fair conclusion as soon as possible. The best way to do that is to move the Democratic nominating convention from the end of August to the end of June. Why? When Democrats vote in Indiana and North Carolina on Tuesday, they will probably render a split decision, with Sen. Barack Obama handily winning in the South and Mrs. Clinton eking out an industrial Midwest victory.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,sun reporter | September 20, 2006
Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin was endorsed by several of Baltimore's most influential black politicians yesterday - officials who had backed his rival in the Democratic primary for Senate - during an event designed to communicate his embrace by the city's African-American leaders. But one key figure was missing: former NAACP chief Kweisi Mfume, whom Cardin defeated in Tuesday's contest. "We'll be together very shortly," Cardin said after the midday rally in front of City Hall, referring to Mfume.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | November 23, 2005
Where did Kweisi Mfume go for support when his U.S. Senate campaign was lagging, and where did he go to celebrate good news? The same place where Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin has gone to church nearly a dozen times since announcing for Senate. The same place Mayor Martin O'Malley went for a casual chat with voters right before announcing his campaign for governor. The same place Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele made official his Senate bid. The same place where talented young politicians are in high demand as lieutenant governor candidates: Prince George's County.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 12, 2005
WASHINGTON - Striking a conciliatory tone, John R. Bolton pledged yesterday to work to forge a new, stronger relationship between the United States and the United Nations if he is approved to be the nation's emissary to the international organization. It was a much more cooperative stance than Bolton, a Baltimore native and frequent critic of the U.N., has taken in the past. But Democrats on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee - who are hoping to convince at least one Republican to defect to their side - reacted with skepticism and a barrage of questions about his interactions with some intelligence analysts in recent years.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - Independent candidate Ralph Nader predicted yesterday that Sen. John Kerry is headed for defeat in the presidential election - and that this time at least, his own candidacy wouldn't be a factor in the outcome. The 70-year-old, anti-corporate activist described the campaign by Kerry, a one-time ally, as a blown opportunity against one of the most vulnerable incumbents in years. Nader praised Kerry not long ago as "very presidential," but he was unsparing yesterday in his critique of the Democratic nominee.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2004
Television's coverage of yesterday's Super Tuesday primaries conjured up the cynical aphorism that the voters simply go to the polls to validate the projections of political pollsters. Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry, yesterday morning's mere frontrunner, became last night's all-but-official Democratic nominee. And, thank heavens for that, at least from the perspective of the punditocracy, which was finally able to focus on the expected match-up between Kerry and President Bush. Two weeks ago, the unexpected momentum of North Carolina Sen. John Edwards twisted the press like a pretzel.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | November 23, 2005
Where did Kweisi Mfume go for support when his U.S. Senate campaign was lagging, and where did he go to celebrate good news? The same place where Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin has gone to church nearly a dozen times since announcing for Senate. The same place Mayor Martin O'Malley went for a casual chat with voters right before announcing his campaign for governor. The same place Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele made official his Senate bid. The same place where talented young politicians are in high demand as lieutenant governor candidates: Prince George's County.
NEWS
March 27, 1991
We agree with H. Ross Perot, the Texas entrepreneur and public-policy idea man, on the postwar partisan political debate. He said it was on the third-grade level of name-calling.Sen. Phil Gramm, R-Texas, didn't even wait for the war to end before he sent out a party fund-raising letter referring to Democrats in Congress as "appeasement before country liberals." Other Republicans have resorted to even more demagogic statements, accusing Democrats of trying to undermine President Bush's efforts.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 9, 2003
PORTSMOUTH, N.H. - In a major lift for his front-running presidential candidacy, former Gov. Howard Dean has gained the support of Al Gore, the 2000 Democratic nominee and the popular-vote winner in the last presidential election. Gore, the former vice president, has remained largely out of the public arena since deciding a year ago that he would not run in 2004. He is expected to appear with Dean today in the early showdown state of Iowa, where the first presidential votes will be cast next month.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2002
James T. Smith Jr., the Democratic nominee for Baltimore County executive, has rejected a series of televised debates proposed by his Republican opponent, Douglas B. Riley, saying his schedule will not permit it. Smith's campaign manager, Michael P. Smith, said the candidates will have debated a dozen times in community forums before the election in November. Adding the three hour-long debates Riley proposed would not be feasible, he said. But Riley said that the community forums can't properly be called debates: They have not been one-on-one, and they have not provided an opportunity for extended discussion about the candidates' ideas.
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