Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDemocratic Nomination
IN THE NEWS

Democratic Nomination

NEWS
By Tony Snow | August 21, 2000
LOS ANGELES - At the height of the Democratic convention, at a moment when members of the audience were trying hard to work themselves into delirium, while the band was blaring and the signs were waving and the delegates were swaying, a very odd thing happened. Not 50 feet from the podium where Al Gore and Joe Lieberman stood to address the throng, a Democratic official who shall remain nameless walked up and asked, "So who do you think is going to win in November?" Thinking that perhaps this was a subtle boast, I gave the same answer I have been giving for weeks, "Ask me in October."
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | June 2, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Even for those who have grown accustomed to grotesque numbers in politics, the $34 million Jon S. Corzine is spending to win a Democratic nomination for the Senate in New Jersey seems a little outlandish. It is, as you may have guessed, the new record for a Senate campaign, passing the $30 million mark established by Michael Huffington in a California campaign six years ago. But Mr. Corzine has accomplished this feat just competing in the primary Tuesday. Mr. Huffington frittered his money away in both capturing the Republican nomination in a primary and then losing the general election to Democrat Dianne Feinstein.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 30, 1999
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- Actor Warren Beatty sketched out the script for a liberal presidential campaign last night -- but did not say whether he would play the leading role himself.Before a huge turnout of reporters and Southern California liberal activists, Beatty offered few clues on whether he intends to launch a long-shot bid for the Democratic presidential nomination.Instead, he called for sweeping campaign finance reform, lashed President Clinton's record, and portrayed both of the current contenders for the Democratic nomination as cautious centrists in thrall to large contributors.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcove | January 13, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Minnesota Sen. Paul Wellstone's decision not to seek the Democratic presidential nomination does not quite rise to the level of bombshell news. The scrappy liberal of the old school always seemed at best the longest of long shots. But his candidacy would have contributed a worthwhile dimension to the 2000 race, if only as a voice of conscience prodding others in his party.Mr. Wellstone's politics obviously are a throwback to New Deal days whose vigorous espousal of activist government has been brushed aside by the New Democrat positioning of President Clinton.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1998
In an apparent upset of one of Anne Arundel County's most visible politicians, Janet S. Owens was headed to victory over Diane R. Evans to become the Democratic candidate for county executive.Supporters of incumbent Republican John G. Gary cheered those results yesterday. They dislike Evans, a long-standing rival of Gary's, and feared her name recognition as former chairman of the county council.Owens, 54, is former director of the county's Department of Aging who has only once previously held elected office, serving as a county Orphan's Court judge from 1990 to 1994, resolving disputes over wills and estates.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1998
In an apparent upset of one of Anne Arundel County's most visible politicians, Janet S. Owens was headed to victory over Diane R. Evans to become the Democratic candidate for county executive.Supporters of incumbent Republican John G. Gary cheered those results yesterday. They dislike Evans, a long-standing rival of Gary's, and feared her name recognition as former chairman of the county council.Owens, 54, is former director of the county's Department of Aging who has only once previously held elected office, serving as a county Orphan's Court judge from 1990 to 1994, resolving disputes over wills and estates.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1998
Marylanders go to the polls today to choose Democratic and Republican nominees for almost every elective office from the courthouse to the State House in a primary election that is expected to be an important barometer of the mood of the voting public.Despite the large number of races, with as many as 2,442 candidates, only a few are hard-fought. Office-seekers and local analysts fear the lack of attention-grabbing party contests for governor, coupled with fallout from the Clinton scandal, will cause many voters to stay away.
NEWS
September 9, 1998
SINCE HIS 1990 election, Sheriff Norman M. Pepersack Jr.'s imperious management style has created lots of controversy in Baltimore County. That's why it is difficult to understand why the sheriff, unopposed in the Republican primary, does not face a tougher Democratic challenge.One Democratic candidate, L. John McClernan, is a lawyer and former deputy sheriff. But he also was found guilty of failure to pay child support last year, offering mental health problems as his defense.Another candidate, Charles D. Cuddy, was a sheriff's department officer assigned to court security until he transferred to become an emergency communications technician.
NEWS
September 3, 1998
FOUR YEARS AGO, the Democratic Party took a beating in Anne Arundel County. Republicans gained their first majority on the county council since the county charter was adopted in 1964. John G. Gary, a state delegate and owner of a drapery business, maintained the GOP grip on Anne Arundel's executive seat. Four of the five men who have held that post have been Republicans.Based on Mr. Gary's popularity for much of his first term, as late as last winter it appeared the Democrats would not field a candidate for the office.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Thomas W. Waldron and William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | February 17, 1998
Rebuffed by the governor in their attempt to return Larry Young to the Maryland Senate, Baltimore Democratic officials picked a former state delegate last night to take his place.John D. Jefferies, a licensing official who once before replaced Young in the legislature, was nominated by the Democratic State Central Committee in the 44th District to fill the seat Young lost last month for ethics transgressions."I'm coming back to give to the community what the community has given me," said Jefferies, 69, who was Young's choice for the nomination.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.