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Democratic Nomination

NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 4, 2004
DES MOINES, Iowa - With the candidates hurtling toward the first 2004 presidential vote two weeks from tomorrow, the contest comes down to this: The nomination could be decided earlier than ever - before most Democrats cast primary ballots or even learn much about their likely nominee. If that happens, the winner will be Howard Brush Dean III, a still largely unknown politician whose phenomenal rise to pre-eminence in a crowded field is the story of the race so far. Dean expects to be a target of renewed attacks when the candidates meet in a televised debate today in Iowa, a prelude to the Jan. 19 caucuses.
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NEWS
By Eric Slater and Eric Slater,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 27, 2003
DURHAM, N.H. - The debate between Democratic presidential hopefuls was about to begin, and the reporter from England was scrambling. As he pulled his laptop and tape recorder from a carrying case, out tumbled a dog-eared, coffee-stained paperback. It was a book on Howard Dean, written by nine current and former Vermont journalists. Many of them covered their former governor for years, "would bump into him at the dump," one recalled, and could call him at home at 10 o'clock at night for a quick quote.
NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein and Ronald Brownstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2003
WASHINGTON - Breaking with a nearly 30-year tradition, former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean announced yesterday that he would become the first Democratic presidential candidate ever to opt out of the system for publicly financing elections. Speaking to supporters in Vermont, Dean said that only by rejecting public financing - and the spending limits it imposes - could he compete financially with President Bush if he wins the Democratic nomination. Bush has rejected public financing and is aiming to raise at least $175 million by the Republican National Convention in September.
NEWS
By Dan Mihalopolous and Dan Mihalopolous,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 23, 2003
COLUMBIA, S.C. - Declaring that voters are "ready to take the next great step" and elect a woman as president, Carol Moseley Braun formally entered the race for the Democratic presidential nomination yesterday. Despite struggling to raise funds and organize a traditional campaign operation during her six-month exploratory campaign, the former senator from Illinois announced a full-fledged White House bid with speeches at the University of Illinois-Chicago and at historically black colleges in Washington, D.C., and Columbia.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Reginald Fields and Doug Donovan and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2003
Sheila Dixon easily fended off a challenge from a City Council colleague to win the Democratic nomination for council president last night, as Baltimore voters overwhelmingly gave the incumbent's political future a major boost. "Despite our differences and despite the criticism that I have received, [the election] made me stronger," said Dixon, who defeated her closest rival, first-term Councilwoman Catherine E. Pugh, and two other Democrats, Carl Stokes and James Hugh Jones II. Citywide support for Dixon, who beat Pugh by about a 5-to-3 margin, translated into a good day for most fellow incumbent Democrats running in the first primary since the council was restructured earlier this year.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Reginald Fields and Doug Donovan and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2003
Sheila Dixon easily fended off a challenge from a City Council colleague to win the Democratic nomination for council president last night, as Baltimore voters overwhelmingly gave the incumbent the chance at a second term in the city's second-highest elective office. "Despite our differences and despite the criticism that I have received, [the election] made me stronger." said Dixon, who defeated first-term Councilwoman Catherine E. Pugh and two other Democrats, James Hugh Jones II and Carl Stokes.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 21, 2003
WASHINGTON - Dennis J. Kucinich for president? Carol Moseley-Braun? Al Sharpton? Howard Dean and Gary Hart, for that matter? On paper, anyway, none of these five presidential hopefuls stirs visions of Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, FDR or even Bill Clinton. Yet each has either jumped into the race for the 2004 Democratic nomination or is poised on the brink - this political season's versions of Gary Bauer, Steve Forbes, Alan Keyes and all the other forgettables of previous presidential years.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2002
To Baltimore voters, next month's Democratic primary for Prince George's County executive may seem familiar. That's because it looks a lot like the race in Baltimore three years ago, when voters had to choose a successor to Kurt L. Schmoke, the city's first African-American mayor. As in that race, when the city elected Martin O'Malley, Prince George's voters must select a replacement for the county's first black executive, Wayne K. Curry, at a time when crime is rising, schools are failing and a general malaise has taken hold.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2002
James G. Fitzgerald got only 826 votes - 21.5 percent of the vote - when he ran four years ago for the Democratic nomination for the District 2 seat on the Howard County Council. It seemed a pitiful showing then, but if the 48-year-old software engineer does just as well in the primary election this September, he could win the race in a redrawn district that covers most of east Columbia and parts of Elkridge and Jessup. That's because another low-turnout election is expected, and if the four Democrats running this year have to split the fewer than 4,000 votes cast in 1998, anyone could win the nomination.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2002
Sounding like a candidate for governor, Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley criticized state Democratic leaders last night for their reluctance to delay the last phase of a planned income tax cut. O'Malley, speaking at the Carroll County Democratic Jefferson-Jackson Dinner, mocked plans to go ahead with the last phase of a five-year, 10 percent tax cut. "Here in Maryland, I fear that we've gotten so obsessed with controlling government, we stopped governing and...
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