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By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2012
Montgomery County Rep. Chris Van Hollen is the latest Democrat from Maryland to land a speaking role in Charlotte next week, Democratic National Convention organizers announced Friday. The addition of Van Hollen's name to the lineup is not a surprise. As the ranking Democrat on the House Budget Committee, he is well suited to counter Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan, the chairman of that committee. In fact, Van Hollen has been doing so for weeks, including during a trip to the Republican convention in Tampa this past week.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Maryland's Democratic candidates for governor made their cases to the party's youths Saturday, but for some, like Baltimore high school student Eric Brown, the race is still a tossup. Brown criticized all three candidates. Of Attorney General Douglas Gansler, the Reginald F. Lewis High School senior said he liked hearing straightforward albeit long answers to questions. Del. Heather Mizeur? "She's an idealist," Brown said. And Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, he said, "had a hard time telling us what he's done.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 4, 2012
The Obama re-election team must be in panic mode. The president is stuck in a virtual tie with Mitt Romney in some polls and behind him in others, so in desperation it has reached out to the Big Dog, Bill Clinton, for help. Mr. Clinton will speak next month at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., in a Wednesday night position often reserved for the vice presidential nominee. Presidents Obama and Clinton have not had the most cordial relationship, but when you're drowning, your feelings about the lifeguard matter less than his ability to keep you afloat.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 10, 2012
Going by the conventional rules of American politics, the Democratic Convention this week was an unmitigated disaster. And, going by the same rules, GOP convention was a disaster, too. So, either the rules of American politics have fundamentally changed, or at least one of the parties is taking an enormous gamble. Since the Nixon years, the GOP has enjoyed a marked advantage over the Democrats at the presidential level. Cultural issues -- race, religion, abortion, patriotism -- have worked to the Republicans' advantage.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley offered pointed criticism of Republicans in an address to the Democratic convention on Tuesday, arguing that President Barack Obama is best suited to right the U.S. economy while GOP nominee Mitt Romney's policies would only move the nation backward. The Democrat said Obama's policies have helped the middle class despite recession and stubbornly high unemployment - to a crowd that chanted with him, "forward, not back. " Though he never mentioned President George W. Bush by name, the address was clearly an attempt to tie Romney and vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan to the former GOP administration that ended a second term with low approval ratings.
NEWS
July 27, 2004
Speakers include: Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean, Rep. Richard A. Gephardt, Teresa Heinz Kerry, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy. On television: MSNBC, Fox News, CNN, C-SPAN, 4 p.m. to 11 p.m.; no live coverage on ABC, CBS or NBC.
NEWS
July 30, 2004
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi "Democrats do not exploit fear to divide and distract the nation." Jim Rassmann, whom Kerry rescued in Vietnam "I've seen John Kerry in action. I know his character. I've witnessed his bravery and leadership under fire. And I know he will be a great commander in chief." Retired Gen. Wesley K. Clark "The safety of our country demands an end to the doctrinaire, ineffective policies that currently grip Washington." NAACP President Kweisi Mfume "Wouldn't it be great if the constitution did not belong to any one party?"
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND AND JULES WITCOVER | July 13, 1992
NEW YORK -- One problem with a suspenseless political convention is that there are still several hundred reporters trying to justify their expense accounts and thus tempted to make big ones out of little ones. A result at this Democratic convention is likely to be a dustup over the abortion issue that is supposed to be largely a problem for Republicans this year.Pennsylvania Gov. Robert P. Casey has been complaining bitterly about the party's unqualified commitment to abortion rights, which he just as unqualifiedly opposes.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | August 26, 1996
TONIGHT AT the Democratic convention, they'll wheel out Christopher Reeve for all the world to see. Everyone except Christopher Reeve (and a few other disabled people in the crowd, strategically placed in view of the TV cameras) will stand.Many will weep. And then they'll smile, wiping away tears, as Reeve speaks.It will be an emotional moment, as we once again see Superman in a wheelchair, we hear Superman's determination to some day climb out of that wheelchair and we root for Superman to fly, or at least to walk.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 17, 1992
NEW YORK -- He didn't lack for money. He didn't lack for audacity. But in the end, Ross Perot lacked one thing you need if you want to become president:Courage.Perot does not possess, in other words, what both Bill Clinton and George Bush possess.Bill Clinton is not called The Comeback Kid for nothing. After a series of bruising revelations and damaging headlines during the New Hampshire primary this February, Clinton hung tough and stayed in.The press was surprised. They expected him to do what Joe Biden had done when he was accused of plagiarism and what Gary Hart had done when he was accused of womanizing four years ago: cut and run.But Clinton decided he would let the people and not the press judge him. And if the people wanted to bury him, they could simply withhold their votes.
NEWS
By Richard Cross III | September 5, 2012
For someone as partisan as Gov. Martin O'Malley, it seems strange that his party's most partisan affair - the Democratic National Convention - has, historically speaking, not been especially friendly territory for him. At the 2004 Democratic convention in Boston, then-Mayor O'Malley delivered a full-throated endorsement of presidential nominee John Kerry. The speech is now remembered for its exaggerated rhetoric - "America the beautiful, whose alabaster cities gleam undimmed by human tears; oh, my friends, to govern is to choose" - and delivery.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley offered pointed criticism of Republicans in an address to the Democratic convention on Tuesday, arguing that President Barack Obama is best suited to right the U.S. economy while GOP nominee Mitt Romney's policies would only move the nation backward. The Democrat said Obama's policies have helped the middle class despite recession and stubbornly high unemployment - to a crowd that chanted with him, "forward, not back. " Though he never mentioned President George W. Bush by name, the address was clearly an attempt to tie Romney and vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan to the former GOP administration that ended a second term with low approval ratings.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2012
When Gov. Martin O'Malley takes the stage at the Democratic convention to give the most important speech of his political career, he'll have to deliver on one deceptively simple goal: He'll need to make people want to hear more. As an increasingly polished speaker and in-demand message man for his party, O'Malley will have an opportunity in Charlotte to solidify his standing as a possible presidential candidate in 2016. He'll also get the chance to redeem himself from the last time he stood on a convention stage eight years ago and flubbed it with a speech criticized as pretentious.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2012
Montgomery County Rep. Chris Van Hollen is the latest Democrat from Maryland to land a speaking role in Charlotte next week, Democratic National Convention organizers announced Friday. The addition of Van Hollen's name to the lineup is not a surprise. As the ranking Democrat on the House Budget Committee, he is well suited to counter Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan, the chairman of that committee. In fact, Van Hollen has been doing so for weeks, including during a trip to the Republican convention in Tampa this past week.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown | August 22, 2012
Sen. Barbara A. Mikulskiwill have a speaking role at the Democratic National Convention, aides said Wednesday. The Maryland Democrat, who this year became the longest-serving woman in congressional history, will lead a program highlighting the record 12 women running this year for Senate. “In this historic election, with more Democratic women running for Senate at one time than ever before, we have a tremendous opportunity to elect women and hold the Senate for Democrats,” Mikulski said in a statement.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 20, 2012
In 1995, Barack Obama released "Dreams From My Father," a compelling memoir full of stories about his life that -- though often not exactly true -- persuaded many people that this young man had a great political future ahead of him. Nearly a decade later, Mr. Obama introduced himself to the country with a stirring speech at the 2004 Democratic convention in which he conceded, "I stand here knowing that my story is part of the larger American story...
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 4, 2012
The Obama re-election team must be in panic mode. The president is stuck in a virtual tie with Mitt Romney in some polls and behind him in others, so in desperation it has reached out to the Big Dog, Bill Clinton, for help. Mr. Clinton will speak next month at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., in a Wednesday night position often reserved for the vice presidential nominee. Presidents Obama and Clinton have not had the most cordial relationship, but when you're drowning, your feelings about the lifeguard matter less than his ability to keep you afloat.
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