Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDemocratic Congress
IN THE NEWS

Democratic Congress

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 9, 2013
I find it rather amusing when far left liberals such as Thomas Schaller ( "GOP just can't say yes to Obama," Aug. 7) shout from the rooftops that former President George W. Bush is responsible for the horrendous deficit and economy that poor President Barack Obama inherited. Yet these dishonest liberals fail to mention that the Democrats were in charge of the House and the Senate during the last two years of Mr. Bush's presidency. Since the president neither makes our laws nor control our finances (Congress does)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 9, 2013
I find it rather amusing when far left liberals such as Thomas Schaller ( "GOP just can't say yes to Obama," Aug. 7) shout from the rooftops that former President George W. Bush is responsible for the horrendous deficit and economy that poor President Barack Obama inherited. Yet these dishonest liberals fail to mention that the Democrats were in charge of the House and the Senate during the last two years of Mr. Bush's presidency. Since the president neither makes our laws nor control our finances (Congress does)
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 1996
Troubled that a Republican Congress might be too conservative and a Democratic one too liberal, voters in House elections across the country divided their votes almost evenly between the two parties, a national survey of 8,469 voters leaving polling places showed last night.Without an obvious national trend, Republican hopes of winning control of the House for the second consecutive election for the first time since 1930 depended on contests in dozens of districts, especially the fate of the 69 Republican freshmen seeking re-election.
NEWS
February 20, 2013
Dr. Ben Carson deplores the moral decay in our society and argues that we are less civilized than we used to be ("Remarks vault Carson into the political arena," Feb. 18). I doubt, however, whether Dr. Carson would prefer to be living several generations ago when an African American was not even admitted into a venerable institution like Johns Hopkins, much less appointed to head one of its divisions. It was through the efforts of many individuals and groups, including progressive Democrats that he is now criticizing, that achieved this remarkable progress in our society.
NEWS
February 20, 2013
Dr. Ben Carson deplores the moral decay in our society and argues that we are less civilized than we used to be ("Remarks vault Carson into the political arena," Feb. 18). I doubt, however, whether Dr. Carson would prefer to be living several generations ago when an African American was not even admitted into a venerable institution like Johns Hopkins, much less appointed to head one of its divisions. It was through the efforts of many individuals and groups, including progressive Democrats that he is now criticizing, that achieved this remarkable progress in our society.
NEWS
By Jack W.Germond and Jules Witcover | February 4, 1992
Manchester,N.H. -- THE SCENE IN a spacious, vacant floor of an old textile mill as Vice President Dan Quayle spoke here the other day was a familiar one to all who have seen the striking television ad of Sen. Tom Harkin, competing in the Feb. 18 Democratic primary.In a similar textile mill, Senator Harkin is seen arguing how the economic policies of President Bush have led to the closing of such once-thriving plants.So there was a certain irony in the choice of Mr. Quayle's schedulers to bring him to this symbol of New Hampshire's decline to tout Mr. Bush's remedy.
NEWS
June 13, 1993
Gridlock was the leitmotif of the 1992 presidential campaign Everybody was against it. Ross Perot vowed he would "send a guy (into Congress) with a chain saw to break the gridlock." George Bush railed against the "gridlock Democratic Congress." Bill Clinton said, "We've got to do something to break the gridlock in Washington," and then went on to describe himself as "the only person with a proven record of passing sweeping reform through the legislature."All too true, but he was talking about the Arkansas legislature, where Republicans hide under the porch.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | November 19, 1994
The American voters in their wisdom overturned the normally ruling presidential party and the normally ruling congressional party, reversing roles, within the space of two years.The result is a new game in Washington. The rules aren't clear. The prize in '96 will go to whichever player figures them out best.The electorate had been comfortable with divided government during the Reagan-Bush presidency and the liberal Democratic Congress, each canceling out the other's doctrinal excesses.But wise authorities excoriated the deficit which that presidency and that Congress conspired to enlarge.
NEWS
November 5, 1992
If Congress treats Bill Clinton the way it did Jimmy Carter, we won't be out of power for 12 years but for 28 years next time.The speaker: Walter F. Mondale.That's one way of putting it. Another way would be to reverse the thought. If Mr. Clinton treats Congress the way Jimmy Carter did, the Democrats could and should be out of power for a long, long time. Mr. Carter, the last Democratic president, cut short his honeymoon with a Democratic-controlled Congress in 1977 after only a month. He issued a hit list of water projects that alienated Rocky Mountain country and convinced many lawmakers he was a Southerner with a cramped view of the country, despite the presence of an experienced Minnesota senator as his vice president.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 8, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Far more legislation than usual was consigned to the congressional boneyard this year as the Democratic-controlled Senate and House lost 35 veto battles with President Bush and enacted only one law over his objections.In addition, some measures pushed hard by the White House were narrowly defeated and Democratic leaders allowed other bills to languish because they lacked enough support.As a result, the new Congress is likely to revisit many bills with their chances for enactment hinging largely on who wins the White House in November.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 4, 2012
The Obama re-election team must be in panic mode. The president is stuck in a virtual tie with Mitt Romney in some polls and behind him in others, so in desperation it has reached out to the Big Dog, Bill Clinton, for help. Mr. Clinton will speak next month at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., in a Wednesday night position often reserved for the vice presidential nominee. Presidents Obama and Clinton have not had the most cordial relationship, but when you're drowning, your feelings about the lifeguard matter less than his ability to keep you afloat.
NEWS
March 23, 2010
N ot so long ago, America's elderly routinely died in abject poverty, with no means to support themselves and no way to pay their crippling medical bills. Social Security and Medicare changed that, and as controversial as both were in their day, it is now nearly impossible to imagine this country without them. Likewise, it will be hard one day to imagine that tens of millions of Americans once lacked health insurance, that people were denied coverage because of pre-existing conditions, that insurance companies dropped them when they became sick and applied lifetime caps on benefits, or that people lost their insurance when they lost their jobs.
NEWS
By Matt Patterson | March 19, 2010
Democrats in Washington are determined to ram their agenda through Congress and -- possibly as soon as this weekend -- transform national health care from liberal dream into legislative reality. To do so, they are willing to ignore: • Public opinion. Large majorities of Americans continue to oppose the health care plan; as of March 8, Rasmussen reported 53 percent against, including 41 percent who strongly oppose. A recent CNN poll found only 25 percent of Americans in favor of the plan, while the balance favor Congress starting over or scrapping work on health care altogether.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | September 2, 2009
CLARIFICATION: During a Sept. 1 town hall meeting about health care, Rep. Steny H. Hoyer said that Congress would look "very seriously" at curbing medical malpractice lawsuits in order to "prevent specious suits," and pointed out that states have addressed the issue by adopting a "cap" on pain and suffering awards, but he did not specifically say that health care legislation now under consideration would include such caps. The Baltimore Sun regrets the error. WALDORF - -House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer said Tuesday night that Congress is likely to consider caps on medical lawsuits as part of its health care overhaul deliberations, but stopped short of assuring his Southern Maryland constituents that he would push for changes in malpractice awards.
NEWS
By Janet Hook and Christi Parsons and Janet Hook and Christi Parsons,Tribune Washington Bureau | December 1, 2008
As a congressman and leader of a party campaign committee, Rahm Emanuel helped 54 Democrats win the House seats they hold today. When Tom Daschle was the Senate Democratic leader, he contributed more than $1.5 million to help a new generation of lawmakers win office. Now, Emanuel and Daschle are key members of Barack Obama's incoming administration, and emblems of a top priority of the new White House team: They are trying to build sturdy bridges between the new White House and Democrats in Congress, coordinating their plans well before Inauguration Day. When lawmakers hear from the two prominent members of Obama's team, they will know that they are talking to people who not only have the president's ear, but who played important roles in putting many of them in Congress.
NEWS
November 6, 2008
A post-election postscript offers a chance to pick up where we left off on critical players in this historic election: Mac is back: In defeat, Sen. John McCain was a politician of striking grace and generosity. His warm tribute to President-elect Barack Obama recalled the John McCain who achieved success on tough issues such as campaign finance reform with compromise, respect and reaching across the aisle. His leadership will be needed in the new Congress. The Buffett factor: Despite Senator Obama's intention to raise taxes on the wealthy, 52 percent of voters earning $200,000 or more supported him, according to exit polls.
NEWS
By William Schneider | October 12, 1990
WHAT WE now have in this country is government by Establishment consensus. It works, except when it doesn't work. It is working in the Persian Gulf, where opposition to the U.S. military buildup is limited to the political fringes on the Left and the Right. It is not working in the case of the federal budget deficit, where the combined opposition of the Left and Right was strong enough to defeat the Establishment consensus.Government by Establishment consensus works when the public supports that consensus -- as it does, so far, in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | June 14, 1991
Washington -- THE TELEVISION networks the other night elected to pass up President Bush's speech to a select audience of some 2,000 politically faithful on the South Lawn of the White House, reportedly on the basis of advice that the president would not be offering any new proposals.The information was correct, but the networks may have erred anyway, because Bush treated his guests to what may well turn out to be his basic re-election campaign speech next year, especially if he remains high in the polls and the Democrats are still in disarray.
NEWS
By THOMAS F. SCHALLER | July 25, 2007
Has Maryland ever exercised more power in Congress than it does right now? In the 110th Congress, the state's two Democratic senators and six Democratic representatives enjoy a degree of influence that may exceed any of the 109 previous sessions. Only 13 states have as many House Democrats as Maryland's six - and just eight of those states also boast two majority-party senators, as Maryland does in Barbara A. Mikulski and Benjamin L. Cardin. Even Wayne T. Gilchrest, one of the delegation's two House Republicans, frequently crosses the aisle to vote with the majority.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 15, 2007
WASHINGTON --In the face of determined opposition from the Bush administration, the Senate yesterday began an impassioned debate over an exit strategy from Iraq, heading toward a vote on a Democratic resolution aimed at a pullout of American combat troops in 2008. Underscoring the mounting tensions between the Democratic Congress and the White House, administration officials immediately issued a veto threat, though the measure is considered unlikely to win final passage. The administration's statement denounced the Democratic plan in forceful terms, declaring that it would "embolden our enemies" and "hobble American commanders in the field."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.