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NEWS
By Jim Jaffe | October 31, 2006
What can we expect from the next Congress? Despite the lack of a public blueprint comparable to Newt Gingrich's 1994 "Contract with America," there are some reliable signals. It promises to be a dramatic environment characterized by more heat than light, one in which politics consistently trumps policy. Don't bet on bipartisan agreements to slash the deficit or reform Medicare. Let's assume that the conventional wisdom is correct: The House will have a modest Democratic majority and the Senate will be nearly evenly balanced.
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NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers Thomas W. Waldron and Robert Timberg contributed to this article | September 13, 1994
The television ads have had their chance to work, the mailboxes are crammed with political fliers, and the debates are over.What happens next is up to Maryland's voters.Beginning at 7 o'clock this morning, voters will begin casting primary election ballots at 1,702 polling places across the state, choosing from among 2,800 Democratic and Republican candidates for almost every elective office from the courthouse to the State House. Polls close at 8 p.m.During those 13 hours, Democrats and Republicans will pick their respective nominees to succeed Gov. William Donald Schaefer, and to run for the U.S. Senate seat Democrat Paul S. Sarbanes has held for 18 years and wants to hold for six more.
NEWS
By Susan Hansen and Susan Hansen,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 7, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Democrats captured gubernatorial victories last night in six states -- including Texas and Florida, two of the year's most highly coveted political prizes.They pulled off a major upset in Texas, with Democratic state Treasurer Ann Richards winning 52 percent to 48 percent over millionaire rancher Clayton Williams in one of the year's most rough-and-tumble political brawls.And in Florida, former Sen. Lawton M. Chiles Jr., 60, was declared the victor over Republican Gov. Bob Martinez, 55, in a contest that should assure Democratic control over the 1992 redistricting process, when the state is expected to pick up four House seats.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1997
EVERYONE apparently was a winner in last week's local elections.The spin-meisters of the Democratic and Republican parties declared victory in Tuesday's voting in Frederick and Annapolis -- where results were mixed.But as both parties began shameless posturing for next year's statewide elections, everyone patted themselves on the back.In Frederick, Republican Mayor James S. Grimes solidly defeated Democratic challenger Frances G. Baker with 54 percent of the vote, while in Annapolis, Republican Dean L. Johnson walked to easy victory over Democrat Dennis M. Callahan, taking 55 percent.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | October 24, 2004
QUESTIONS HAVE BEEN expressed during this political season about whether black voters need to re-examine their strong support for Democratic platforms and candidates in favor of Republican policies that might now have new relevance for blacks. To say today that the poor must help themselves not by demanding a seat at a lunch counter but by owning that lunch counter and, by inference, that Republican domestic policies would further that aim, requires blacks to overlook decades of history in this country.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | May 6, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Spurred by the public's deepening fears of deadly imports, Congress is moving to give federal health officials the added money and new police powers they have long wanted to fix a broken drug safety system. After years of criticizing the Food and Drug Administration's failures, Democratic and Republican legislators are coming together on strengthening the embattled agency. "FDA is overstretched in terms of its responsibilities and underfunded," Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, a Massachusetts Democrat, said at a hearing last week on the agency's troubles.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Karen Hosler and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau Carl Cannon and John O'Donnell of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | November 16, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton engaged in fierce "hand-to-hand combat" with opponents of the North American Free Trade Agreement yesterday for the support of the few dozen lawmakers whose votes will decide the fate of the controversial pact tomorrow.As both Democratic and Republican members of Congress shuttled in and out of the White House for some last-minute back-slapping and arm-twisting, Mr. Clinton's aides expressed increasing confidence that he would win the crucial ballot in the House of Representatives tomorrow evening.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Jennifer McMenamin and Josh Mitchell and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN REPORTERS | September 13, 2006
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. secured the Democratic Party's nomination for a second term last night, while two county councilmen effectively won re-election. Smith, who was leading his closest rival in the Democratic primary by a margin of more than 8-to-1, was set to move on to a general election against Clarence W. Bell Jr., a state police lieutenant and the Republican candidate. "I think we carry a lot of momentum into the general election, irrespective of who our opponent will be," Smith said last night at the Holiday Inn in Timonium, where he awaited results with Democratic state's attorney candidate Scott D. Shellenberger and others.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | August 22, 1992
HOUSTON -- One sign on the floor of the Republican National Convention here, copied on T-shirts worn by delegates, told much about the mood of many of them. It said: "I Don't Believe the Liberal Press." Another was even more pointed: "Lynch the Liberal Media Elite."Variations on the same sentiments were heard repeatedly from speakers and Republicans interviewed on television, including first lady Barbara Bush, who complained that the Republican Party, President Bush and Vice President Dan Quayle all were getting a raw deal from the Fourth Estate.
NEWS
By Stanley B. Greenberg | March 10, 1995
Washington -- THESE ARE heady days in the House.They are no less heady for Republican theorists and consultants, who are working feverishly to fabricate a mandate for all the legislative activity by attempting to elevate the 1994 election and give it meaning.That rush to judgment in the House, they argue, is not mere politics but a contract steeped in all the legitimacy of a popular conservative upheaval.Irving Kristol, co-editor of The Public Interest, calls what Speaker Newt Gingrich is doing "revolutionary."
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