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NEWS
July 3, 2007
Here are the candidates who filed papers by yesterday's 9 p.m. deadline to enter Baltimore's Democratic and Republican primaries for mayor, comptroller and City Council president. Mayor Democrats Phillip A. Brown Jr. Andrey Bundley Jill P. Carter Frank M. Conaway Sheila Dixon (incumbent) A. Robert Kaufman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. Mike Schaefer Republican Elbert R. Henderson City Council President Democrats Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake (incumbent) Kenneth N. Harris Sr. Michael Sarbanes Charles Ulysses Smith Republicans none Comptroller Democrat Joan M. Pratt (incumbent)
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | October 5, 2014
Thousands of miles on the road this summer and fall have afforded me the opportunity to observe a variety of political ads from across the spectrum. Herewith, observations from the heartland: I assume the relentless Democratic campaign to demonize the conservative Koch Brothers and their "Americans for Prosperity" organization has been poll tested, but I still don't get it. Driving negatives against someone (or something) that few people recognize violates a core tenet of political advertising.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 1, 2000
Two years before the 2002 election, Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend holds a commanding lead over her prospective Democratic and Republican rivals in the governor's race, according to a poll released yesterday. The survey of registered voters, conducted Aug. 23 through Monday by Gonzales/Arscott Research & Communications Inc., shows Townsend with a 52 percent to 29 percent lead over U.S. Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who is considered a possible Republican candidate. She was favored by 49 percent of Democrats, compared with 12 percent for Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan, 10 percent for Baltimore County's C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger and 8 percent for Prince George's County's Wayne K. Curry
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 28, 2014
Probably no single episode did more to assure President Obama's 2012 re-election than that supposedly private fundraising lunch at which Mitt Romney famously declared that "47 percent of Americans" would never vote for him. The remark, unexpectedly captured on video, spread swiftly over the Internet and the airwaves, marking the hapless Mr. Romney in his own words as an elitist icon of the rich, unable or unwilling to comprehend how the other half...
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | January 15, 1992
Democratic and Republican lawmakers have closed ranks, salvaging a bipartisan coalition to challenge the state's new congressional districts before the U.S. Supreme Court.A subcommittee of the county's Democrat-controlled General Assembly delegation asked Annapolis lawyer John Greiber Monday to appeal a lower court's decision upholding the new districts."We've promised to back him with all the moral and financial support within our wherewithal," said Del. Victor Sulin, D-Severn.Del. John Gary, R-Millersville, said: "There was no question the Republicans were willing to do it. But it has more impact if the Democrats stick with us. That is very important."
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | August 12, 1994
Several of the county's leading environmental and social activists endorsed Democrat Theodore Sophocleus for county executive yesterday.The activists, who have formed a political action committee, said they will support Mr. Sophocleus, a state delegate and former county councilman from Linthicum, with money and volunteers.Mary Rosso, chairwoman for Anne Arundel Voters for Environmental Justice, said Mr. Sophocleus, the Democratic nominee for executive four years ago, expressed the clearest support for the group's goals and was considered the most "electable" of the six Democratic and Republican candidates.
NEWS
October 29, 1990
In contests for the Maryland Senate and House of Delegates, Howard Countians enjoy an embarrassment of riches in the number of well-qualified candidates, Democratic and Republican.In the District 13 Senate race, two-term Democratic incumbent Thomas M. Yeager faces a spirited challenge from Guy L. Harriman of Laurel, a moderate Republican who has never held public office. In our view Yeager, a member of the Senate Ethics Committee and Judicial Proceedings Committee and a key aide to Senate President Mike Miller, is the better choice.
NEWS
August 21, 2005
THE QUESTION: When are the city of Annapolis elections? Annapolis will hold primaries for mayor and city council on Sept. 20, and its general election on Nov. 8. In the mayor's race, Democratic incumbent Ellen O. Moyer and Republican George O. Kelley Sr. do not face opposition from candidates within their own party. Still, they will appear on their respective party's ballot on Sept. 20. Moyer is completing her first term as mayor, a post held by her ex-husband "Kip." Kelley is a former Annapolis police officer who switched political parties earlier this year.
NEWS
March 1, 1992
Selecting a presidential nominee on Tuesday is only half the job for voters. They also have to choose delegates for the Democratic and Republican national conventions.On the Republican side, the task is simple: Pick three candidates from a long list of convention hopefuls. Those who are on the Buchanan or Bush slates are so indicated. The winners will be the ones with the highest vote totals in each district.The Democratic balloting is complex. Depending on your congressional district, you'll choose 5, 6 or 7 convention delegates.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 18, 2002
WASHINGTON - Hog-tied by politics from getting anything done on the job, members of Congress are rushing home this week to urge voters to send them back for more. With control of the House of Representatives and Senate up for grabs, the Democratic and Republican parties are searching for issues to galvanize voters to give them the slight edge they need to triumph Nov. 5. But while Iraq and the economy dominate conversation in Washington, the picture around the country is much different.
NEWS
By Robert Yentzer | January 28, 2013
When it comes to fixing America's ballooning debt problem, there is one policy option that both Democrats and Republicans should be rushing to embrace. It is the proposal to replace the current Consumer Price Index (CPI) with a more accurate measure of price inflation: the Chained-CPI. If this index were used to calculate cost of living increases in Social Security benefits, income tax brackets and the like, the government could realize significant savings. The current CPI's exaggerated estimates of inflation are a wasteful leak in the fiscal pipeline.
NEWS
November 30, 2012
Years ago I heard someone say that if you can write the problem on the board, it is half solved. Several times I have found it to be true. Letter writer John Brown did not correctly address the Republican's problem or the nation's ("The GOP lost because it's out of touch," Nov. 28). Too many people are jobless and living at poverty level with inadequate medical care while our nation is rapidly increasing its debt. But that is not the problem. That is the situation. And no one disagrees with it - not Democrats, not liberals, not journalists, not even Republicans.
NEWS
February 14, 2012
Your article, "New budget to renew battles" (Feb. 12) points out the stark and perhaps unprecedented separation between our two major political parties. Democrats continue to display timidity and confusion and are often too ready to compromise, but they have generally proposed balanced approaches to solving the nation's ills. Republicans on the other hand have taken several extreme and dangerous positions. All current candidates have pledged to reverse Roe v. Wade and to forcibly evict some 12 million undocumented workers and their families.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | June 30, 2011
President Barack Obama's news conference Wednesday - his first in 15 weeks - made clear his strategy for reelection is the same old clarion call for class warfare, pitting the evil rich against the saintly poor. "I think it's only fair," said the president, "to ask an oil company or a corporate jet owner that's doing so well to give up that tax break. …I don't think that's so radical. " In fact, he mentioned "corporate jet owners" half a dozen times during his appearance.
NEWS
June 7, 2011
I just can't take this anymore. I am sick of the Democrats (tax the rich) and Republicans (cut programs but not defense) and their endless back and forth about who is to blame for the deficit. Guess what gang? Both of you are. A perfect example of this is the commentary on June 7 titled "Tax cuts for the rich have made us poorer" by Rion Dennis and Roger Rath. All they do is complain about the Bush tax cuts. Could we slightly increase the tax rates for the very wealthy? Yes. But they fail to address the biggest problem in this country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | June 6, 2011
U.S. Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas), a GOP presidential candidate, was on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday, and, as usual, the congressman skewered at least one sacred cow of American politics.  Paul's target this time? The notion that Republicans and Democrats are diametrically opposed political parties. You know, the idea that they're bitter political opponents. They fight over everything. They hate each other.  But the truth is, Paul said, they're the same party.  "We don’t have a good democratic process," Paul said.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 31, 2005
WASHINGTON - Democrats are likely to vote unanimously against John R. Bolton when his nomination to be ambassador to the United Nations comes before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee next week, according to Democratic and Republican lawmakers and aides. It would mark the first time committee Democrats have unanimously opposed a Bush diplomatic nominee and would put the nomination in peril if any Republicans defected to vote against him. But Republicans say they believe the outspoken conservative will win solid GOP backing in the committee, including from the moderate Sen. Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island, who has voiced reservations about Bolton's nomination to be U.N. ambassador.
NEWS
October 4, 1998
AMERICA MAY be a two-party country, but in Baltimore one would never know it. The last time a Republican was elected in the city was in 1954, when Harry Cole (now a retired judge) was elected to the Maryland Senate. (The City Council lost its last Republican in 1931.)The Cole victory heralded the end of white machine control of west side politics. But Democrats regrouped and four years later Mr. Cole was defeated. Today, registered Democrats outnumber Republicans nearly 9-1.Nowhere is this Democratic hegemony more evident than at the city courthouse.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | January 2, 2011
Bipartisanship broke out in the lame-duck Congress. Most notably, Republicans voted with Democrats for the New Start treaty with Russia and the end of a 17-year ban on openly gay soldiers. Does this signal a new era of bipartisanship in 2011? No chance. Neither of these victories had anything to do with the economy or taxes — in other words, with the central question of who gets what in America. President Barack Obama couldn't get a single Republican to agree to limit the Bush tax cuts to the first $250,000 of income.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2010
Both candidates in the Baltimore County Council District 3 race had some confessing to do at a community forum this week, but neither man revealed the full extent of his past troubles with the law. Democrat Ben Sutley and Republican Todd Huff were asked at the end of a 90-minute forum at The Lodge in Oregon Ridge on Monday night to talk about their own past conduct. The question, submitted by a member of the audience anonymously, reflected that word of Sutley's and Huff's legal troubles has been circulating for months, but neither had been asked openly to talk about it. Neither man went into detail about the incidents, which in Sutley's case involved driving while intoxicated and a drug charge, and in Huff's case a conviction for leaving the scene of an accident, charges of passing a bad check and a handgun violation.
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