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By New York Times News Service | September 3, 1993
JERUSALEM -- John Demjanjuk's deportation from Israel was put off for the fifth time yesterday when a Supreme Court justice said he wanted more time to consider an appeal from Israelis pressing for new war-crimes charges stemming from the "Ivan the Terrible" case.Theodore Orr did not say how long he would take to decide, but it seemed likely that Mr. Demjanjuk, 73, would remain at the Ayalon Prison near Tel Aviv into next week and perhaps beyond.In any event, he will not be on hand, as his family had hoped, when a U.S. appeals court in Cincinnati holds a hearing today on whether to reopen the proceeding that had stripped him of his U.S. citizenship in 1981.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 30, 2005
CLEVELAND -- Nearly three decades after the United States first accused him of being a Nazi death camp guard, retired Ohio autoworker John Demjanjuk appeared in court yesterday to fight deportation, with his lawyers arguing that he would face torture if returned to his native Ukraine. Demjanjuk, 85, lost his U.S. citizenship in 2002 after a federal judge found that World War II documents proved he had worked as a guard at several camps in Poland. Justice Department officials are seeking to deport him to Ukraine or Germany, where he lived before entering the United States in 1952.
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NEWS
By Washington Bureau | September 1, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A federal appeals court turned down temporarily yesterday a move by retired Ohio autoworker John Demjanjuk's lawyers to guarantee his return to the United States if his war crimes conviction in Israel is overturned.In a brief order, the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati said it had no word from Israel that Demjanjuk would be released at this time, or in the future, and thus the question of his return home was "premature."Demjanjuk was found guilty and sentenced to hang in Israel for war crimes against Jews held at the Nazi death camp at Treblinka, Poland, in World War II, based on evidence that he was a guard known as "Ivan the Terrible."
NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON and LYLE DENNISTON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration moved yesterday to restart one of the government's most famous Nazi-hunting cases -- the campaign begun 22 years ago to strip John Demjanjuk, a retired Ohio autoworker, of his U.S. citizenship and deport him as a war criminal.Demjanjuk, once labeled the notorious "Ivan the Terrible," a mass murderer at a Nazi death camp in Treblinka, Poland, has seen his case move repeatedly in and out of U.S. courts. It returned to federal court in Cleveland yesterday as the Justice Department filed a new demand that he be denaturalized.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | August 5, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration, using polite legal language to deliver a blunt message, demanded yesterday that a federal appeals court stand aside from the continuing dispute over the war-crimes case of retired American autoworker John Demjanjuk.The administration argued that it is up to the Israeli courts, or the U.S. government, to work out the fate of Demjanjuk, who has been convicted in Israel of murdering hundreds of thousands of Jews at the Nazi death camp at Treblinka, Poland.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | August 4, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Lawyers for John Demjanjuk, the retired Ohio autoworker now under death sentence in Israel for Nazi war crimes, urged a federal appeals court yesterday to order the U.S. government to bring him home and give back his U.S. citizenship.Demjanjuk, his attorneys argued, was the victim of a "fraud on the court" by Justice Department lawyers who intentionally withheld for years information that would show he was not "Ivan the Terrible," the man who ran the gas chamber motors that killed millions of Jews at the Treblinka death camp.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A federal appeals panel has excoriated the Justice Department's Nazi-hunting unit, saying that it had fraudulently withheld evidence that would have helped John Demjanjuk defend himself against charges that he was one of the most barbaric figures of the Holocaust.The unanimous opinion yesterday by a three-judge panel in Cincinnati said prosecutors had withheld evidence in part to curry favor with Jewish organizations, which had put pressure on them to prove that Mr. Demjanjuk was the notorious "Ivan the Terrible" at the Treblinka death camp in Poland.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | December 31, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department asked a federal judge yesterday to erase any doubt that retired Cleveland auto worker John Demjanjuk committed Nazi war crimes and thus forfeited his U.S. citizenship and his right to stay in this country.In a move to ensure the strongest legal basis for a new effort to deport the 73-year-old Ukraine native, the department urged U.S. District Judge Frank J. Battisti of Cleveland to reaffirm a 12-year-old ruling that had stripped Mr. Demjanjuk of his citizenship.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | July 17, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department held firmly yesterday to its 15-year-old claim that retired Ohio autoworker John Demjanjuk was "Ivan the Terrible" -- the Nazi guard who turned on the gas jets that killed thousands of Jews at a death camp in Poland during World War II.Newly available evidence that "Ivan the Terrible" was someone else, the department contended in a 64-page legal document filed in a federal court, is not legally reliable.Recollections of Jewish survivors of the death camp at Treblinka, Poland, that Demjanjuk was the hated executioner still stand solidly, it said.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 30, 1993
WASHINGTON -- So John "Ivan" Demjanjuk may not be Ivan the Terrible after all.He is merely Ivan the Unspeakable, Ivan the Reprehensible, Ivan the Despicable.And that is what the Israeli Supreme Court said yesterday in overturning his death sentence and ordering his release from prison.Demjanjuk, a former Cleveland auto worker, entered the United States in 1952, became a citizen in 1958, was stripped of that citizenship in 1981 and was sent to Israel for trial in 1986.And though a U.S. congressman now wants the United States to welcome Demjanjuk back, there is at least one man at the Justice Department who is going to do everything he legally can to make sure that never happens.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 4, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In a surprising rebuff to the Clinton administration, the Supreme Court opened its new term yesterday by refusing to bolster the government's troubled legal maneuver aimed at forcing John Demjanjuk out of the country as a Nazi war criminal.The term's first day was marked by a clear sign that the justices are shying away from many controversies, large and small: They denied review of all 1,659 cases that were covered by yesterday's orders.This was the first time in memory that the court took on no new cases on its traditional "first Monday in October" beginning.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | December 31, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department asked a federal judge yesterday to erase any doubt that retired Cleveland auto worker John Demjanjuk committed Nazi war crimes and thus forfeited his U.S. citizenship and his right to stay in this country.In a move to ensure the strongest legal basis for a new effort to deport the 73-year-old Ukraine native, the department urged U.S. District Judge Frank J. Battisti of Cleveland to reaffirm a 12-year-old ruling that had stripped Mr. Demjanjuk of his citizenship.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A federal appeals panel has excoriated the Justice Department's Nazi-hunting unit, saying that it had fraudulently withheld evidence that would have helped John Demjanjuk defend himself against charges that he was one of the most barbaric figures of the Holocaust.The unanimous opinion yesterday by a three-judge panel in Cincinnati said prosecutors had withheld evidence in part to curry favor with Jewish organizations, which had put pressure on them to prove that Mr. Demjanjuk was the notorious "Ivan the Terrible" at the Treblinka death camp in Poland.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | November 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Accusing Justice Department lawyers of illegally manipulating U.S. court cases against accused Nazi war criminal John Demjanjuk, a federal appeals court ruled yesterday that he should never have been sent to Israel to be tried for death camp atrocities.Although the victory was Mr. Demjanjuk's second in recent months in courts here or overseas, he still faces a firm Justice Department demand that he be deported as soon as legally possible for war crimes or for lying on immigration papers.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | September 25, 1993
The release of John Demjanjuk by Israel and his readmission to the United States may represent the considered judgment of two great legal systems after years of deliberation.But it puts a strain on the civil society of Greater Cleveland, which that region will have trouble containing and which it did nothing to deserve.Probably most of the Jews of Greater Cleveland, living in suburbs east of the city, believe that Mr. Demjanjuk must be guilty of crimes against humanity, the identity of the camp in which he committed them not mattering, and of having entered this country illegally in the first place by concealing the facts.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | September 24, 1993
Washington. -- What would I want as the foundation of a truly just society? I would want judges who are not beholden to whatever politicians are in power, and who cannot be intimidated by the political, social, racial or religious passions of the day.I am provoked to say this by the laudable actions of the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in the case of John Demjanjuk, who has long been demonized by ''Nazi hunters'' and a few U.S. officials as ''Ivan the...
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 4, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In a surprising rebuff to the Clinton administration, the Supreme Court opened its new term yesterday by refusing to bolster the government's troubled legal maneuver aimed at forcing John Demjanjuk out of the country as a Nazi war criminal.The term's first day was marked by a clear sign that the justices are shying away from many controversies, large and small: They denied review of all 1,659 cases that were covered by yesterday's orders.This was the first time in memory that the court took on no new cases on its traditional "first Monday in October" beginning.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 5, 1993
JERUSALEM -- The Israeli Justice Ministry, which is considering a petition that would require John Demjanjuk to stand trial for war crimes other than the one he was acquitted of by the Israeli Supreme Court, said a ruling by a U.S. court overturning Mr. Demjanjuk's extradition order and challenging Israel's right to try him for other crimes "is not legally binding on the state of Israel."The statement came in response to a decision Tuesday by the United States appeals court. The court ruled that Mr. Demjanjuk should not be tried in Israel for any other wartime offenses.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | September 23, 1993
CLEVELAND -- The wood-and-wire fence went up yesterday morning around the modest, blond brick home in suburban Seven Hills. Earlier, bright-pink professionally printed signs sprouted on doors, windows and trees of the neighboring homes: "NO TRESPASSING. PRIVATE PROPERTY."The wagons have circled around the frail-looking 73-year-old neighbor who has been absent for seven years, save for images in the media. Although sprung on Tuesday from an Israeli prison, he remains locked in a heated, history-bound controversy that prevents this man, accused of being a Nazi death-camp guard, from returning to the neighborhood that would embrace him even as others would condemn him to the same fate as his alleged victims.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 3, 1993
JERUSALEM -- John Demjanjuk's deportation from Israel was put off for the fifth time yesterday when a Supreme Court justice said he wanted more time to consider an appeal from Israelis pressing for new war-crimes charges stemming from the "Ivan the Terrible" case.Theodore Orr did not say how long he would take to decide, but it seemed likely that Mr. Demjanjuk, 73, would remain at the Ayalon Prison near Tel Aviv into next week and perhaps beyond.In any event, he will not be on hand, as his family had hoped, when a U.S. appeals court in Cincinnati holds a hearing today on whether to reopen the proceeding that had stripped him of his U.S. citizenship in 1981.
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