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NEWS
January 17, 2012
A phrase appears today above the vignette (or nameplate) on the front page of The Sun : CELEBRATING 175 YEARS. The actual anniversary date is May 17, but the first celebration of the paper's longevity began at midnight last night with sponsorship of the New Year's fireworks display over the Inner Harbor. (I glimpsed some of it from a sixth-floor window.) I bring this up mainly to mention that, despite the difficult times that newspapers are struggling through, despite the chortling of those predicting The Sun 's imminent demise,* we are still here.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Convicted double murderer John Booth-El died in prison over the weekend, but a thorny debate outlived him: What should happen to the four other death-row inmates in legal limbo after the repeal of Maryland's capital punishment law? Booth-El's death, which authorities said appeared to be from natural causes, rekindled debate over whether the inmates - all convicted of murder and sentenced years ago - should have their terms commuted to reflect the state's new attitude toward the death penalty.
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NEWS
August 23, 2012
Two foolish, under-aged, teenage girls drinking and sitting on a freight train bridge, dangling their feet 20 feet above the street at midnight while Tweeting ("Derailed lives," Aug. 22), then buried in coal? The girls contributed significantly to their tragic demise. As in "self-inflicted. " The Sun's coverage included information about CSX accidents of the past ("CSX has history of Md. mishaps"). Why not a companion article about the jobs and economic benefit that CSX brings to Maryland and the danger of trespassing on railroad tracks and freight train bridges?
SPORTS
September 20, 2013
With the cancellation of the Baltimore Grand Prix next year, The Sun got exactly what it wanted. The demise of that race. Champagne all around! Baltimore is a "blue collar" town and it proved it. Very sad. Randall Miller, Ocean View, Del.
NEWS
May 10, 2012
The tea party's waning impact on the country's politics has been continuously reported since the movement's success in the 2010 elections. Well, the tea party has not gone away. In Indiana's primary election May 8, liberal Republican Senator Richard Lugar was beaten handily after 35 years in office by conservative rival Richard Mourdock, who was backed by the tea party ("GOP Senate stalwart falls," May 9). The liberal media and their supporters seem to believe that if they keep reporting tea party's death, it will simply go away.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | April 29, 2010
Attention, readers: While the start of this column might suggest that you're about to be informed of the demise of a great American institution — because that's how it seemed to your columnist when he first started looking into the matter — be consoled that the story has an ending brighter than one might expect. Mrs. Pinky Howard — that's what I said, Pinky Howard — took time out from her preparations for this weekend's annual carnival at St. Pius X Roman Catholic Church to explain about the end of the Bake Room.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2011
John Houser III reviews Cazbar in Friday's Live section. Someone spread it around that Cazbar, an "authentic Turkish taverna" in Downtown Baltimore, had closed. It was I, Richard Gorelick. I'd feel much less guilty about that whole ugly episode if you read John's review of Cazbar . It includes a revelatory moment, the sure feeling of eating the best version possible of a thing. Find out what what it was.  
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Staff Writer | February 14, 1993
They come by the dozens, in a procession of misery that includes some of the most desperate drug abusers in Maryland."By paying their bills, we may be causing our own demise."
SPORTS
September 20, 2013
With the cancellation of the Baltimore Grand Prix next year, The Sun got exactly what it wanted. The demise of that race. Champagne all around! Baltimore is a "blue collar" town and it proved it. Very sad. Randall Miller, Ocean View, Del.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2002
ON MARCH 22, the Maryland Department of Education sort of announced that MSPAP would die of unnatural causes after this spring's administration of the test. Sort of, because the department wasn't eager for the news to get out. The department put out a routine news release with this headline: "U.S. Officials Allow Local Systems Not Receiving Title I Aid for Middle Schools to Opt Out of Eighth Grade MSPAP This Year." I vaguely remember seeing an electronic copy and clicking to something else after a couple of paragraphs.
NEWS
By Eddie Somers and Duke Marshall | July 7, 2013
Some believe it is inevitable that Smith Island will be lost to erosion and rising sea levels. We disagree. As members of Smith Island United, a group formed to preserve Smith Island, we believe the government has pretty much eliminated the word ""inevitable"" when it comes to the future of Chesapeake Bay islands. Hart Miller and Poplar islands in the upper bay were basically ""created"" by the government from open bay waters. These are very big projects. Poplar Island, off Tilghman Island, started in 1998 with a 35,000 foot stone dike, which was then filled with dredged spoils and is currently over 1,000 acres of high land and marsh.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
As they reflect on the scenes from their last seven months, the baseball players of Towson University feel almost as if they're looking in on someone else's life. President Maravene Loeschke, flanked by campus police officers, gathering them so she could pronounce the program dead. Their phones buzzing with texts, heralding a reprieve from the governor. Joyously collapsing on one another after winning their conference tournament and clinching their first NCAA bid in 22 years. "If you saw it on TV, you wouldn't believe it," said Patricia Johnson, one of the parents who fought to keep the program alive.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | April 9, 2013
People say dogs look like their owners. That may not be true, but they certainly look and act like we want them to, as breeds are a construct of generations of culling for certain aesthetic and other traits, including hunting ability, intelligence and, in some cases, viciousness. Which brings us to pit bulls, considered "inherently dangerous" under Maryland law since a 2012 Court of Appeals ruling. Some of the dogs that fall into that general description are ferocious, because humans designed them to be. But so are a lot of other dogs that, for whatever nature or nurture reason, like to bite people - which is why many urged lawmakers to overturn the decision.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 15, 2013
Among the casualties of the 2012 presidential election, along with Mitt Romney, was the vanishing breed of moderate Republicans of which he once was a star, until his embarrassing lurch into conservatism. Mr. Romney first failed to win the GOP nomination in 2008 as a moderate governor of heavily Democratic Massachusetts. Four years later, he shed the middle-road path followed by his late father, George Romney, who won three terms as governor of Michigan but failed to win the Republican presidential nomination in 1968.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2012
The effort to connect former Sparrows Point workers with training for new careers gained more urgency last week as the final hopes of the steel mill reopening were dashed - and as the deadline to apply for the help or forever lose it fast approaches for hundreds. More than 1,600 of the people laid off from the Baltimore County plant are eligible for federal "trade adjustment" benefits, which cover retraining costs and come with a stipend equal to unemployment benefits once those run out. Only half have enrolled.
NEWS
August 23, 2012
Two foolish, under-aged, teenage girls drinking and sitting on a freight train bridge, dangling their feet 20 feet above the street at midnight while Tweeting ("Derailed lives," Aug. 22), then buried in coal? The girls contributed significantly to their tragic demise. As in "self-inflicted. " The Sun's coverage included information about CSX accidents of the past ("CSX has history of Md. mishaps"). Why not a companion article about the jobs and economic benefit that CSX brings to Maryland and the danger of trespassing on railroad tracks and freight train bridges?
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | June 3, 1994
TBILISI, Georgia -- Eduard A. Shevardnadze, who helped keep the world from exploding as he negotiated the end of the Cold War, somehow has been unable to do the same in his own small, forgotten homeland.Mr. Shevardnadze, the last Soviet foreign minister, the diplomat who was the toast of the world as he oversaw the dismantling of the Berlin Wall and the growth of the Soviet Union's friendship with the United States, now spends his days surrounded by bodyguards, increasingly disregarded and even reviled as Georgia destroys itself.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2002
One Saturday night in September 1878, the Shot Tower on downtown's east side looked like a 215-foot candle ready to blow. A fire raged inside the brick cylinder where workers for decades had made shot by dropping molten lead. "At that time, the spectacle viewed from any elevated point about the city, or from the harbor or river, was strikingly grand," reported The Sun. "The tower was enveloped in flames, and from the top they shot far up into the air, giving to the distant looker-on the appearance of a great column of fire."
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
Baltimore's cutting-edge theater scene just became a bit less razor-sharp. For the first time in more than 40 years, Spanish puppet troupes and headline-making performers who smear chocolate on their skin will have a hard time finding a stage where they can put on their shows. Primarily for economic reasons, Baltimore's venerable Theatre Project has quietly stopped bringing in experimental artists with global and national reputations. Instead, the 150-seat showhouse at 45 W. Preston St. is hosting local theater and regional dance companies.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
Maryland made it official today, confirming that seven athletic teams will be discontinued. Men's outdoor track and field will remain, although the sport will need to reach financial benchmarks down the road in order to remain viable. The eliminated sports are: men's tennis; men's indoor track and field and cross country; men's and women's swimming and diving; women's water polo; and women's acrobatics and tumbling. Some reflections: ** I can't help but think of how members of the Maryland men's and women's track and field teams sat in a semicircle between the starting line and high-jump pit on a November day and were told by athletic director Kevin Anderson that the men's program was being recommended for elimination.
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