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By Chris Kaltenbach | August 12, 1997
It's not every director who hangs around long enough to direct his own re-make. But then, Cecil B. DeMille was not just any director. He was the biggest cash cow of the silent era, the man who perfected the art of the blockbuster and a filmmaker who somehow managed to get his leading lady into a bathtub in just about all his films.AMC celebrates DeMille's 116th birthday with a daylong festival featuring some of his finest films. The best air early, so I hope you're reading this over breakfast: "The Ten Commandments" (7 a.m.-9: 30 a.m.)
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NEWS
May 21, 2006
HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL: ENCORE EDITION / / Walt Disney Home Entertainment / / $26.99 Ah, high school -- when people spontaneously broke into song every 15 minutes or so. No? That is the world of the Disney TV movie High School Musical, which tells the story of basketball star Troy and super-smart Gabriella, who meet and, in a contrived way, discover they can sing during a New Year's Eve vacation. Fast-forward to the start of the new semester, and who but Gabriella is the newest transfer student at Troy's East High.
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FEATURES
By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 12, 2004
They never shared a marquee in life, but they're linked in death as coming attractions from Turner Classic Movies. Cary Grant, Charlie Chaplin and director Cecil B. DeMille will be profiled in major documentaries during the next six months. Charlie: The Life and Art of Charles Chaplin appears in March, along with 11 of the actor-director's films and 36 of his short films. Time critic Richard Schickel directed and wrote Charlie and conducted interviews with Woody Allen, Martin Scorsese, Johnny Depp, Marcel Marceau, Claire Bloom and Robert Downey Jr. Schickel also worked extensively with actress Geraldine Chaplin, his subject's daughter.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 7, 2005
BOSTON - This is one of those moments when you really can blame Hollywood for the culture wars. Not the Hollywood of Michael Moore and Mel Gibson, but the Hollywood of Cecil B. DeMille and Charlton Heston. Mr. DeMille was the mogul who bragged: "Give me any two pages of the Bible and I'll give you a picture." Almost a half-century ago, he took a few more pages and made The Ten Commandments. When the epic was done, Mr. DeMille went into publicity overdrive. He funded the Fraternal Order of Eagles' promotion of Ten Commandments displays.
NEWS
November 14, 1994
The Rev. H.K. Rasbach, 81, pastor of Hope Lutheran Church of Hollywood, a producer of religious films and adviser to Cecil B. DeMille on "The Ten Commandments," died Nov. 7. of stroke complications.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 18, 2000
For all the uproar that Spike Jonze's campaign video for Al Gore has created, one would think that this is the first time a Hollywood director has ever plied his trade in the service of Washington's myth-making machinery. In fact, politicians have used up-to-the-minute media to burnish their image at least as far back as the cave drawing at Lasceaux, which no doubt only slightly exaggerated the hunting prowess of that community's Alpha Male (or a candidate for Alpha Male). From those ancient glyphs to classical painting and sculpture to Mathew Brady's Civil War-era photographs, politicians have always wooed the premiere artists of the day to help get their faces - or, more important, their right faces - in the public eye. Abraham Lincoln was only half-joking when he admitted that Brady's iconic portrait helped him win the White House.
NEWS
May 21, 2006
HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL: ENCORE EDITION / / Walt Disney Home Entertainment / / $26.99 Ah, high school -- when people spontaneously broke into song every 15 minutes or so. No? That is the world of the Disney TV movie High School Musical, which tells the story of basketball star Troy and super-smart Gabriella, who meet and, in a contrived way, discover they can sing during a New Year's Eve vacation. Fast-forward to the start of the new semester, and who but Gabriella is the newest transfer student at Troy's East High.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 7, 2005
BOSTON - This is one of those moments when you really can blame Hollywood for the culture wars. Not the Hollywood of Michael Moore and Mel Gibson, but the Hollywood of Cecil B. DeMille and Charlton Heston. Mr. DeMille was the mogul who bragged: "Give me any two pages of the Bible and I'll give you a picture." Almost a half-century ago, he took a few more pages and made The Ten Commandments. When the epic was done, Mr. DeMille went into publicity overdrive. He funded the Fraternal Order of Eagles' promotion of Ten Commandments displays.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Oline H. Cogdill and Oline H. Cogdill,South Florida Sun-Sentinel | January 2, 2005
Night Fall By Nelson DeMille, read by Scott Brick. Time Warner Audiobooks (abridged, 6 1/2 hours, 5 CDs. $29.98) Using a real event in a thriller -- in this case, the 1996 explosion of TWA Flight 800 off Long Island -- is one of the riskiest things an author can do. The ploy often screams that the author is capitalizing on another's pain. But veteran thriller writer Nelson DeMille not only sensitively uses this real tragedy in Night Fall, but he gives us a view of our recent history and some insight into the 9 / 11 Commission's description of the country's "lack of imagination" in the fight against terrorism.
NEWS
By George Neff Lucas | August 14, 1992
It's tempting to question the fitnessOf Reagan's next role as a witness;He signed on enough$ Of Iran-contra stuffBut promptly forgot the whole bitness.Heston came from DeMille's movie lotsTo make matching video spots:One seeks limitation$ Of world population,One assures it with NRA shots.If our weaponry wasn't as smartAs censors first sought to impart,By eluding each bomb& Laser-aimed at Saddam,His survival was state of the art.This year, as we vote without verve,We wonder who threw us a curve;But while we berate( This and that candidate,They may be the ones we deserve.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Oline H. Cogdill and Oline H. Cogdill,South Florida Sun-Sentinel | January 2, 2005
Night Fall By Nelson DeMille, read by Scott Brick. Time Warner Audiobooks (abridged, 6 1/2 hours, 5 CDs. $29.98) Using a real event in a thriller -- in this case, the 1996 explosion of TWA Flight 800 off Long Island -- is one of the riskiest things an author can do. The ploy often screams that the author is capitalizing on another's pain. But veteran thriller writer Nelson DeMille not only sensitively uses this real tragedy in Night Fall, but he gives us a view of our recent history and some insight into the 9 / 11 Commission's description of the country's "lack of imagination" in the fight against terrorism.
FEATURES
By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 12, 2004
They never shared a marquee in life, but they're linked in death as coming attractions from Turner Classic Movies. Cary Grant, Charlie Chaplin and director Cecil B. DeMille will be profiled in major documentaries during the next six months. Charlie: The Life and Art of Charles Chaplin appears in March, along with 11 of the actor-director's films and 36 of his short films. Time critic Richard Schickel directed and wrote Charlie and conducted interviews with Woody Allen, Martin Scorsese, Johnny Depp, Marcel Marceau, Claire Bloom and Robert Downey Jr. Schickel also worked extensively with actress Geraldine Chaplin, his subject's daughter.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 18, 2000
For all the uproar that Spike Jonze's campaign video for Al Gore has created, one would think that this is the first time a Hollywood director has ever plied his trade in the service of Washington's myth-making machinery. In fact, politicians have used up-to-the-minute media to burnish their image at least as far back as the cave drawing at Lasceaux, which no doubt only slightly exaggerated the hunting prowess of that community's Alpha Male (or a candidate for Alpha Male). From those ancient glyphs to classical painting and sculpture to Mathew Brady's Civil War-era photographs, politicians have always wooed the premiere artists of the day to help get their faces - or, more important, their right faces - in the public eye. Abraham Lincoln was only half-joking when he admitted that Brady's iconic portrait helped him win the White House.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 12, 1997
It's not every director who hangs around long enough to direct his own re-make. But then, Cecil B. DeMille was not just any director. He was the biggest cash cow of the silent era, the man who perfected the art of the blockbuster and a filmmaker who somehow managed to get his leading lady into a bathtub in just about all his films.AMC celebrates DeMille's 116th birthday with a daylong festival featuring some of his finest films. The best air early, so I hope you're reading this over breakfast: "The Ten Commandments" (7 a.m.-9: 30 a.m.)
NEWS
November 14, 1994
The Rev. H.K. Rasbach, 81, pastor of Hope Lutheran Church of Hollywood, a producer of religious films and adviser to Cecil B. DeMille on "The Ten Commandments," died Nov. 7. of stroke complications.
NEWS
September 16, 2005
ON September 13, 2005, ROBERT L. ANDERSON JR. of Columbia, beloved husband of Cathy Anderson; devoted father of Demille Richardson and Che' Counts; cherished brother of Yvonne Howell, Jacqueline Batie and Melvin Anderson; loving grandfather of Ky'ana Counts; devoted son of Lillie Anderson and the late Robert L. Anderson Sr. Relatives and friends are invited to call for visitation and Services on Friday from 6 to 8 P.M., at St. John"s Baptist Church, 8910...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,sun staff | August 2, 1998
Sex. Violence. Language. Religion.Hot-button topics all, guaranteed to start debate in the halls of Congress, arguments at cocktail parties and controversy when brought to movie screens.Forty-seven years ago, the intense sexuality of "A Streetcar Named Desire" ruffled America's feathers. Twenty-nine years ago, the numbing violence of Sam Peckinpah's "The Wild Bunch" had audiences wondering how far Hollywood should be allowed to go. Fourteen years ago, Jean-Luc Godard's "Hail Mary" had people crying blasphemy and dousing moviegoers with holy water.
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