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By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2001
The largest U.S.-flag cruise ship company filed for bankruptcy protection yesterday and is pulling six of its seven vessels from service, including one that was serving Baltimore. American Classic Voyages launched an East Coast route in May with the Cape May Light, which stopped in Baltimore as it cruised the Chesapeake Bay and the mid-Atlantic coast. The company, based in Miami, blamed the bankruptcy partly on the chill in tourism caused by the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. In the month after the attacks, the company's gross bookings dropped 50 percent, cancellations rose 30 percent, and its cash position weakened, according to a news statement.
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BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
Gleaming white with twin black smokestacks and a 23-ton red paddle wheel at its stern, the Queen of the Mississippi is an apparition rising more than five stories above the Wicomico River. Before the month is out, the lines holding it dockside at Chesapeake Shipbuilding Corp. will be cast off and the Queen will churn down the coast on its way to New Orleans, a life on America's most famous river and a showdown with a bigger-name rival. American Cruise Lines, the Connecticut-based owner of the vessel, is betting that the 280-foot riverboat is exactly what the cruising public wants.
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By John Madson and John Madson,Universal Press Syndicate | November 24, 1991
Mark Twain never cared much for the blue Ohio.He was a true, mud-blooded Mississippi riverman, saying that Ohio River water was just too clear to be healthy, while muddy Mississippi River water was so nutritious that a man drinking it "could grow corn in his stomach if he wanted to."Well, Twain knew rivers and wrote truly. But the Ohio deserved better. Even without a rich cargo of mud, it's nourishing enough -- a jade-colored feast for the eyes with as much history as you care to digest.For years I've been too beguiled by the Missouri and upper Mississippi rivers to spend time on the Ohio.
TRAVEL
August 26, 2007
10 FOR THE ROAD Top spots to reel 'em in The top 10 places to go fishing with your family, according to cable TV's Sportsman Channel: 1. Clear Lake, Calif. (bass) 2. Sitka, Alaska (salmon, halibut) 3. Ecofina Creek, Fla. (catfish) 4. Lake Sinclair, Ga. (crawfish, crappie) 5. Guntersville Lake, Ala. (bass) 6. Venice, La. (red fish, trout) 7. Lake Ontario, N.Y. (salmon, lake trout) 8. Clinton Lake, Ill. (largemouth bass) 9. Cape Cod, Mass. (Atlantic striper) 10. Rogerson, Idaho (walleye, trout)
TRAVEL
August 26, 2007
10 FOR THE ROAD Top spots to reel 'em in The top 10 places to go fishing with your family, according to cable TV's Sportsman Channel: 1. Clear Lake, Calif. (bass) 2. Sitka, Alaska (salmon, halibut) 3. Ecofina Creek, Fla. (catfish) 4. Lake Sinclair, Ga. (crawfish, crappie) 5. Guntersville Lake, Ala. (bass) 6. Venice, La. (red fish, trout) 7. Lake Ontario, N.Y. (salmon, lake trout) 8. Clinton Lake, Ill. (largemouth bass) 9. Cape Cod, Mass. (Atlantic striper) 10. Rogerson, Idaho (walleye, trout)
FEATURES
By Kim Wesley | October 9, 1994
Preparing for a royal trip on the American QueenMark Twain risked death and humiliation learning how to pilot a steamboat in "Life on the Mississippi," but you don't have to go through all that to ride on one today. Cruises on an old-fashioned paddle wheeler now come complete with elevators and swimming pools and crews that do the work for you.And in less than a year, the country's largest passenger steamboat -- the American Queen -- will be ready to welcome you aboard.When building is complete, the 4,700-ton American Queen will have six decks and all the amenities of the grand riverboats of yore -- an Opera House theater with a tall proscenium stage and private mezzanine box seats; an elegant dining room with window views of the river; and, of course, a 50-ton paddle wheel to make it go.Builders recently attached the American Queen's 59-ton bow to the steamboat's all-steel welded hull.
FEATURES
By Kara Kenna | May 8, 1994
Saddle up for a Wales rideA new trail-riding trip through the North Wales countryside has been added to the horseback vacations offered by Cross Country International Equestrian Vacations. Ideal for beginner, intermediate and advanced riders, the trail covers about 120 miles across the Lleyn peninsula, one of the most remote regions Wales.Riding groups are limited to a maximum of six riders, plus a leader. The cost for the six-day/seven-night trip, which follows // the Pilgrim Trail westerly, is $1,425; a three-day/four-night trip that travels east along the Snowdonia Trail costs $950.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | November 2, 2003
A Memorable Place Rediscovering America, on a steamboat By Robert Lidston SPECIAL TO THE SUN During the 1970s, people said I looked like a young Mark Twain. My hair and mustache were reddish-brown and bushy. Since then, my hair has become mostly white. Last year, I booked a steamboat trip from New Orleans to Memphis on the 80-year-old Delta Queen, which is on the National Register of Historic Places. I let my hair and mustache grow for a few months, packed a black bow tie and off-white summer suit, and bought a big, cheap cigar.
FEATURES
By Judi Dash and Judi Dash,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 1996
While congregating around the home hearth with all the relatives may be a holiday tradition, an increasing number of adventurous folks are seeking new ways -- and places -- to celebrate. Travel operators are offering a slew of Christmas, Hanukkah and New Year's trips around the world trimmed with festivities that accent the holiday spirit.Savor Christmas dining Cajun-style in Louisiana, biking through northern California's wine country or making a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Ring in the new year horse-packing into the Grand Canyon, cruising the Caribbean, or enjoying a black-tie ball and caviar tastings in St. Petersburg, Russia.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
Gleaming white with twin black smokestacks and a 23-ton red paddle wheel at its stern, the Queen of the Mississippi is an apparition rising more than five stories above the Wicomico River. Before the month is out, the lines holding it dockside at Chesapeake Shipbuilding Corp. will be cast off and the Queen will churn down the coast on its way to New Orleans, a life on America's most famous river and a showdown with a bigger-name rival. American Cruise Lines, the Connecticut-based owner of the vessel, is betting that the 280-foot riverboat is exactly what the cruising public wants.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | November 2, 2003
A Memorable Place Rediscovering America, on a steamboat By Robert Lidston SPECIAL TO THE SUN During the 1970s, people said I looked like a young Mark Twain. My hair and mustache were reddish-brown and bushy. Since then, my hair has become mostly white. Last year, I booked a steamboat trip from New Orleans to Memphis on the 80-year-old Delta Queen, which is on the National Register of Historic Places. I let my hair and mustache grow for a few months, packed a black bow tie and off-white summer suit, and bought a big, cheap cigar.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2001
The largest U.S.-flag cruise ship company filed for bankruptcy protection yesterday and is pulling six of its seven vessels from service, including one that was serving Baltimore. American Classic Voyages launched an East Coast route in May with the Cape May Light, which stopped in Baltimore as it cruised the Chesapeake Bay and the mid-Atlantic coast. The company, based in Miami, blamed the bankruptcy partly on the chill in tourism caused by the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. In the month after the attacks, the company's gross bookings dropped 50 percent, cancellations rose 30 percent, and its cash position weakened, according to a news statement.
FEATURES
By Judi Dash and Judi Dash,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 1996
While congregating around the home hearth with all the relatives may be a holiday tradition, an increasing number of adventurous folks are seeking new ways -- and places -- to celebrate. Travel operators are offering a slew of Christmas, Hanukkah and New Year's trips around the world trimmed with festivities that accent the holiday spirit.Savor Christmas dining Cajun-style in Louisiana, biking through northern California's wine country or making a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Ring in the new year horse-packing into the Grand Canyon, cruising the Caribbean, or enjoying a black-tie ball and caviar tastings in St. Petersburg, Russia.
FEATURES
By Kim Wesley | October 9, 1994
Preparing for a royal trip on the American QueenMark Twain risked death and humiliation learning how to pilot a steamboat in "Life on the Mississippi," but you don't have to go through all that to ride on one today. Cruises on an old-fashioned paddle wheeler now come complete with elevators and swimming pools and crews that do the work for you.And in less than a year, the country's largest passenger steamboat -- the American Queen -- will be ready to welcome you aboard.When building is complete, the 4,700-ton American Queen will have six decks and all the amenities of the grand riverboats of yore -- an Opera House theater with a tall proscenium stage and private mezzanine box seats; an elegant dining room with window views of the river; and, of course, a 50-ton paddle wheel to make it go.Builders recently attached the American Queen's 59-ton bow to the steamboat's all-steel welded hull.
FEATURES
By Kara Kenna | May 8, 1994
Saddle up for a Wales rideA new trail-riding trip through the North Wales countryside has been added to the horseback vacations offered by Cross Country International Equestrian Vacations. Ideal for beginner, intermediate and advanced riders, the trail covers about 120 miles across the Lleyn peninsula, one of the most remote regions Wales.Riding groups are limited to a maximum of six riders, plus a leader. The cost for the six-day/seven-night trip, which follows // the Pilgrim Trail westerly, is $1,425; a three-day/four-night trip that travels east along the Snowdonia Trail costs $950.
FEATURES
By John Madson and John Madson,Universal Press Syndicate | November 24, 1991
Mark Twain never cared much for the blue Ohio.He was a true, mud-blooded Mississippi riverman, saying that Ohio River water was just too clear to be healthy, while muddy Mississippi River water was so nutritious that a man drinking it "could grow corn in his stomach if he wanted to."Well, Twain knew rivers and wrote truly. But the Ohio deserved better. Even without a rich cargo of mud, it's nourishing enough -- a jade-colored feast for the eyes with as much history as you care to digest.For years I've been too beguiled by the Missouri and upper Mississippi rivers to spend time on the Ohio.
FEATURES
By Arline Bleecker and Arline Bleecker,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 20, 1994
It's been called "the greatest two minutes in sports" -- the Kentucky Derby at Louisville's famed Churchill Downs -- when horse racing's best 3-year-olds compete in the first leg of the Triple Crown.The Delta Queen Steamboat Company hopes that before race-goers cruise to the Derby May 7, they might want to cruise on the company's two paddle-wheel steamers.With some overlap, the four cruises run between April 29 and May 13. Fares range from $1,150 per person for the least expensive cabin on a four-night cruise up to $5,015 for the most expensive on the nine-night cruise.
FEATURES
By Orlando Sentinel | September 18, 1994
There's so much music happening aboard cruise ships these days that it's a wonder there are any musicians left shoreside to serenade landlubbers.Whether your tastes run to Rachmaninoff or rock and roll, there is probably a music-theme cruise to suit it. Here is a sampling of cruises that not only strike up the bands, but orchestras, quartets and soloists as well:* On the Norway, the 12th Annual Floating Jazz Festival promises nonstop music during sea days...
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