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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | May 30, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Ross Perot may not want to be "separated from the people," as he's said in recent interviews when asked about Secret Service protection.But make no mistake, the Texas billionaire doesn't want to be ruffled by them either.Disturb the peace in the lobby of his Dallas business headquarters, and you could encounter not a scowling Kelly Girl, but the fiercest, sharpest, hungriest fighting man the U.S. military turns out.You could encounter the Delta Force.Mr. Perot will not discuss security matters, a spokesman for the expected presidential contender said.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman, Mark Matthews and David L. Greene and Tom Bowman, Mark Matthews and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 21, 2001
WASHINGTON - The number of people who are missing and presumed dead at the site of the World Trade Center in New York rose sharply yesterday, to 6,333. For several days, the number had been reported to be 5,422. Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani said the toll was raised to reflect the number of foreigners believed to have been killed in the terrorist attack last week. People from more than 60 nations are thought to be among the victims. Britain alone has said it lost 250 citizens. After more than a week of holding out hope of finding people alive in the ruins, Giuliani now says it is all but certain that no one will be found alive.
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau Staff writer Richard H. P. Sia contributed to this article | August 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Making the disarming of warlords a specific U.S. military goal, Secretary of Defense Les Aspin said yesterday that U.S. combat troops won't leave Somalia until much of the warlords' heavy weaponry has been seized, the capital is secure and police forces are set up.While Mr. Aspin left the commitment open-ended, there were new indications yesterday of imminent action to remove what the United Nations sees as the key obstacle to Mogadishu security...
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 17, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In darkness, Army Rangers, their faces blackened, parachute onto the airfield. Navy SEALs, in scuba gear, emerge from the waters around the port.The clandestine Delta Force slips through the streets of Port-au-Prince to the homes and offices of the military dictators.Marines leap from helicopters and landing craft to seize command and communication points in the capital. And the 82nd Airborne paratroopers descend from the night sky to join the attack.That is how an invasion of Haiti would start, according to experts inside and outside the Pentagon.
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | April 19, 1991
Annapolis Police Sgt. Robert E. Beans, who was cleared of charges hebroke departmental rules last year, has asked the city to reimburse him for his legal expenses.Beans said he had to take out a secondmortgage to pay his legal bills, which he said totaled about $70,000. He wouldn't say how much money he has requested from the city."It's nothing outrageous," Beans said. "All I want is the money Iput out. The city didn't have a case at all. The city attorney should have known this before putting on a trial."
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | April 24, 1991
The Annapolis City Council on Monday night refused to reimburse police Sgt. Robert E. Beans for legal expenses.Beans, who was head ofthe now-defunct Delta Force drug squad, has said he spent about $70,000 last year defending himself from charges he broke departmental rules. A police trial board cleared him of the charges. He won't say how much money he is seeking from the city.The council's vote, which came in closed session, means Beans would have to sue to get the money. He is represented by Baltimore attorney C. Christopher Brown, who could not be reached for comment yesterday.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff writer | January 22, 1991
As city and police officials develop new strategies to curb growing violence and drug use in Annapolis, they also urge residents to take a more active role."
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff writer | July 7, 1991
Annapolis police Sgt. Robert E. Beans is suing his union, seeking reimbursement for $19,000 in legal fees incurred while defending himself against charges of misconduct.In the suit, Beans contends the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 400 was obligated under the state's Law Enforcement Officer's Bill of Rights to represent him at aMay 1990 police trial board hearing.In the suit, filed last week in county Circuit Court, Beans says the union rejected two of his requests for representation at the hearing and, in March, turned down his request for reimbursement for his legal fees.
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | October 29, 1990
Sgt. Robert E. Beans has resigned as head of the Black Officers Association of the Annapolis Police Department.Narcotics officer George Kelley, who came to the department two years ago after seven years with the New York City Police Department, will be the association's new president.The change in leadership of the organization coincides with the arrival of Harold Robbins as the city's new police chief."When I was president, I was going through a bunch of things with the old administration," said Beans, a 20-year veteran who led the association for three years.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 17, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In darkness, Army Rangers, their faces blackened, parachute onto the airfield. Navy SEALs, in scuba gear, emerge from the waters around the port.The clandestine Delta Force slips through the streets of Port-au-Prince to the homes and offices of the military dictators.Marines leap from helicopters and landing craft to seize command and communication points in the capital. And the 82nd Airborne paratroopers descend from the night sky to join the attack.That is how an invasion of Haiti would start, according to experts inside and outside the Pentagon.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | June 27, 1994
EVERY PUNDIT is required to say something about O. J. Simpson, but by now what hasn't been said? Well:1. If Nicole Brown Simpson had carried a gun, she'd be alive today.2. Once convicted, Simpson should be executed, on the Phil Donahue show. That would get the world's immediate attention the way no execution ever has, and we could finally have a truly informed debate on capital punishment.3. First, of course, he should appear on Oprah to talk about domestic spats.4. Smart-aleck Question: Will the O. J. story affect the presidential campaign of O. J's former team-mate, Jack Kemp?
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | September 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Pancho Villa taught the U.S. Army 77 years ago that snaring warlords can be tricky business, and when Congress gets back next week, the Clinton administration may find that the idea of arresting Mohamed Farah Aidid is viewed dubiously, as well.It was with an anxious eye on Congress that the administration last month sent a task force of 400 Rangers to Somalia, ostensibly to augment a U.S.-commanded "quick reaction force" charged with providing security for United Nations operations.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau Staff writer Richard H. P. Sia contributed to this article | August 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Making the disarming of warlords a specific U.S. military goal, Secretary of Defense Les Aspin said yesterday that U.S. combat troops won't leave Somalia until much of the warlords' heavy weaponry has been seized, the capital is secure and police forces are set up.While Mr. Aspin left the commitment open-ended, there were new indications yesterday of imminent action to remove what the United Nations sees as the key obstacle to Mogadishu security...
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | May 30, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Ross Perot may not want to be "separated from the people," as he's said in recent interviews when asked about Secret Service protection.But make no mistake, the Texas billionaire doesn't want to be ruffled by them either.Disturb the peace in the lobby of his Dallas business headquarters, and you could encounter not a scowling Kelly Girl, but the fiercest, sharpest, hungriest fighting man the U.S. military turns out.You could encounter the Delta Force.Mr. Perot will not discuss security matters, a spokesman for the expected presidential contender said.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff writer | July 7, 1991
Annapolis police Sgt. Robert E. Beans is suing his union, seeking reimbursement for $19,000 in legal fees incurred while defending himself against charges of misconduct.In the suit, Beans contends the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 400 was obligated under the state's Law Enforcement Officer's Bill of Rights to represent him at aMay 1990 police trial board hearing.In the suit, filed last week in county Circuit Court, Beans says the union rejected two of his requests for representation at the hearing and, in March, turned down his request for reimbursement for his legal fees.
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | April 24, 1991
The Annapolis City Council on Monday night refused to reimburse police Sgt. Robert E. Beans for legal expenses.Beans, who was head ofthe now-defunct Delta Force drug squad, has said he spent about $70,000 last year defending himself from charges he broke departmental rules. A police trial board cleared him of the charges. He won't say how much money he is seeking from the city.The council's vote, which came in closed session, means Beans would have to sue to get the money. He is represented by Baltimore attorney C. Christopher Brown, who could not be reached for comment yesterday.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | June 27, 1994
EVERY PUNDIT is required to say something about O. J. Simpson, but by now what hasn't been said? Well:1. If Nicole Brown Simpson had carried a gun, she'd be alive today.2. Once convicted, Simpson should be executed, on the Phil Donahue show. That would get the world's immediate attention the way no execution ever has, and we could finally have a truly informed debate on capital punishment.3. First, of course, he should appear on Oprah to talk about domestic spats.4. Smart-aleck Question: Will the O. J. story affect the presidential campaign of O. J's former team-mate, Jack Kemp?
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | October 29, 1990
Harold Robbins began a crash course in the Annapolis Police Department last Monday, and by week's end, city officers were hopeful the new police chief could reunite their troubled department."
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | April 19, 1991
Annapolis Police Sgt. Robert E. Beans, who was cleared of charges hebroke departmental rules last year, has asked the city to reimburse him for his legal expenses.Beans said he had to take out a secondmortgage to pay his legal bills, which he said totaled about $70,000. He wouldn't say how much money he has requested from the city."It's nothing outrageous," Beans said. "All I want is the money Iput out. The city didn't have a case at all. The city attorney should have known this before putting on a trial."
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff writer | January 22, 1991
As city and police officials develop new strategies to curb growing violence and drug use in Annapolis, they also urge residents to take a more active role."
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