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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Trapped in a steel cage barely big enough to hold her, the large squirrel was not happy, pawing at the bars and trying them with her teeth. Matt Whitbeck and Cherry Keller of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service were glad to see her, though. The furry gray prisoner, released after being weighed and checked, offered yet another sign that the Delmarva Peninsula fox squirrel, once vanishingly rare, has come back. This supersized, reputedly shy member of the squirrel family now is considered fully recovered, according to federal wildlife officials.
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By Peter Crispino and For The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2014
More than three decades ago, 22-year-old Annapolis native Andy Teeling climbed aboard his 16-foot dory and embarked on an ambitious journey to circumnavigate the 450-mile coastline of the Delmarva Peninsula in a rowboat. After two months of rowing under the summer sun, and with his first semester of college beckoning him back to shore, Teeling's journey was stalled in Chincoteague, Va., 150 miles short of his goal. This week Teeling, 35 years later at age 57, finished the adventure.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | May 20, 2008
William Potter Dukes, a former educator who established a magazine in the late 1970s devoted to the culture and way of life of the Delmarva Peninsula, died Friday of pulmonary fibrosis at Perry Point Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The longtime Denton resident was 71. Mr. Dukes was born in Baltimore and raised on Wickford Road in Roland Park. He attended Friends School and then transferred to Severn School in order to prepare himself for entrance to the Naval Academy. At the academy, he studied electrical engineering and planned to become a Navy pilot.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
When Guy W. Willey Sr. was growing up, he hunted and ate Delmarva fox squirrels in the low-lying forests of the Eastern Shore, long before it was clear the giant cousins of the common gray squirrel were in danger of disappearing. He was "dirt poor," he recalled, and lots of folks did it back then. Now, at 83, he's been invited to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge on Friday, when federal officials are expected to announce the squirrel has bounced back from the brink of extinction and is no longer in need of legal protection.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | February 1, 2007
Charles Norris "Scorchy" Tawes, a former roving reporter and photographer for WBOC-TV who traveled the back roads, villages and towns of the Delmarva Peninsula recording the life stories of the folks he met along the way, died Monday of cardiovascular disease at the Alice Byrd Tawes Nursing Home in Crisfield. He was 86. Mr. Tawes was an accomplished fisherman, and the Scorchy Tawes Pro-Am Fishing Tournament was named after him. He began his television career in 1975 at WBOC in Salisbury, giving an outdoors and fishing report.
NEWS
By James Bock and Dail Willis and James Bock and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1996
SALISBURY -- Open the door of a stained-glass chapel at St. Francis de Sales Catholic Church and hear the sound of change on the Eastern Shore -- in Spanish.The priest is Salvadoran. The parishioner strumming the guitar is from Mexico. And the singing worshipers' home countries make up a virtual map of Latin America: Bolivia, Colombia, Cuba, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Puerto Rico and more.In only a few years, Spanish-speaking immigrants have become a presence across the Delmarva Peninsula.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2000
OCEAN PINES - Billed as a retirement haven at its founding 32 years ago, Ocean Pines is beginning its final surge of development as a magnet for aging baby boomers. The same demographic bubble is fueling similar growth up and down the Delmarva Peninsula. A few miles north of Ocean Pines, a Virginia-based company is moving ahead with plans for a 2,900-unit golf course community straddling the Maryland-Delaware border. At the southern tip of Delmarva, in Cape Charles, Va., construction has begun on a 1,700-acre golf resort community that many believe is a first step in transforming the backwater into a suburb of Norfolk and Virginia Beach, located 45 minutes away via the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | April 18, 2009
Hank Walter in Phoenix asks why the temperature in Salisbury is often 10 degrees lower than the surrounding areas: "In the mornings, the temperature there is usually as cold as it is in York, Pa." I've heard that before. Best guess: Salisbury, at the center of the Delmarva Peninsula, cools more at night because it's farther than nearby towns from the moderating influences of the bay and ocean.
SPORTS
By Special to The Sun | September 4, 1993
BERLIN -- Eddie Davis, a harness racing legend on the Delmarva Peninsula, notched the 5,500th victory of his sulky career last night at Delmarva Downs, driving D T Star to victory in a $5,500 Maryland Race Fund event.Davis, 49, of Smyrna got away second with the 2-year-old Bonebreaker gelding, then moved to the lead down the backstretch and drew clear to win handily in 2 minutes, 4 4/5 seconds. Don Trivits of Salisbury owns and trains D T Star.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1999
Drugstore giant Rite Aid Corp. will expand on Maryland's Eastern Shore and double its presence in Delaware by acquiring Edgehill Drugs Inc., the largest drugstore chain on the Delmarva Peninsula, Rite Aid said yesterday.The nation's third-largest drugstore operator, with more than $12 billion in annual sales, said it will add privately owned Edgehill's 25 stores to its empire.Rite Aid did not disclose the purchase price. The company is scheduled to close the deal March 2 and expects the acquisition to add to earnings starting with the first quarter of fiscal year 2000.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Elizabeth C. Bellavance, an educator, social activist, and patron of the academic and arts communities who was also an outspoken advocate for the Eastern Shore's Hispanic community, died July 24 of cancer at Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in Richmond, Va. She was 77. "Liz was an extraordinary, extraordinary woman. I used to call her the Grand Dame of the Eastern Shore," said Kim Propeack, a lawyer who is the political and communications director for Casa de Maryland.
NEWS
By Wenonah Hauter and Julie Gouldener | March 7, 2014
We have taxed nearly every Marylander to pay for significant nutrient removal at wastewater treatment plants through the Chesapeake Bay Restoration Fee, known as the flush tax, amounting to $60 per year for each household. Gov. Martin O'Malley also supported the so-called "rain tax" to manage urban storm water pollution. But when it comes to agriculture, the polluter-pays concept is discarded, and agriculture is instead offered hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars to do what it ought to be already doing to reduce pollution runoff.
TRAVEL
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Michael Maykrantz was on duty at a fire house on 74th street in Ocean City when the floor began to shake and the doors started to rattle. At Bart Rader's house in Ocean Pines, a loud boom “like somebody blew something up” preceded shaking so heavy that it rattled a 50-pound metal sculpture against the wall. Miles away in Annapolis, Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan was meeting in state Sen. James Mathias' office when he got a text message from his daughter: “What the heck was that?
NEWS
By Candy Thomson and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
As J.C. Barbely looked at Assateague Island in his rearview mirror Saturday night, he was pretty sure his seaside home away from home wouldn't escape Sandy's fury. But Wednesday morning, the assistant manager of the Maryland Park Service's biggest money-maker readied to reopen the park for day use before the week was out. Bulldozers plugged ragged holes in the dunes with sand washed into the parking lots, inspectors checked buildings, bridges and walkways, and crews gathered debris and counted wild ponies.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
Hurricane Sandy is a category 2 storm with 105 mph winds, and though it will be weaker than that five days from now, it could wreak havoc anywhere from the Delmarva Peninsula to Cape Cod, an increasing number of models are showing. The storm is still nearing the Bahamas, but as the days pass and forecasters continue to run various models, a track to the north is still among the potential scenarios. It's also possible the storm will stay out to sea, but as time goes on, it's more models that are predicting a serious East Coast impact, not fewer.
NEWS
By Gerald Winegrad | February 20, 2012
Millions of tons of one of theChesapeake Bay'slargest sources of pollution continue to be dumped onto farm lands without proper regulation. Farm animals produce 44 million tons of manure annually in the bay watershed, and most of it is collected and disposed of on farmland - or left where it falls. This ranks the bay region in the top 10 percent in the nation for manure-related nitrogen runoff, and the problem of proper management of this waste is exacerbated by the fact that three highly concentrated animal feeding operation areas contribute more than 90 percent of the manure.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - The three-state Delmarva Peninsula will become the first site of a new nationwide program that will create development-free zones for farmers and wildlife under a bill scheduled for final House approval today. The final version of the farm bill produced by House and Senate negotiators includes the Delmarva Conservation Corridor proposal, sponsored by Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest of the Eastern Shore. The Delmarva Peninsula includes parts of Maryland, Delaware and Virginia. The Senate is expected to approve the bill by the end of the month and send it to President Bush to be signed into law. The success of the Delmarva proposal is a victory for Gilchrest, a Kent County Republican who has worked for more than two years to realize his vision of preserving large rural tracts where animals and plants can exist freely without subdivisions or shopping malls.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
Scientists have found more intersex fish in Maryland, this time on the Eastern Shore, and their research suggests one possible source of the gender-bending condition could be the poultry manure that is widely used there to fertilize croplands. Six lakes and ponds on the Delmarva Peninsula sampled over the past two years have yielded male largemouth bass carrying eggs, according to University of Maryland scientists. Those are the first intersex fish reported there, though researchers found the condition several years ago in smallmouth bass in the Potomac and its tributaries, and recently found it in smallmouth bass in the Susquehanna.
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