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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | December 25, 1994
Sightings of a thin, balding and beardless Santa Claus entering and leaving a Forest Hill workshop in the days before Christmas were accurate.Curiously, the jolly, but not so old, St. Nick wore plain clothes. He had a ready smile, a twinkle in his eye and was a dead ringer for Capt. Jesse Bane of the Harford County sheriff's office. In fact, it was he.And Santa's workshop, dank and dark, looked a lot like a basement donated by Ralph Klein, a local grocery chain owner.In preparation for today, the workshop emptied fast Wednesday and Thursday as elves, who in real life are retired deputies Bud Hans and Bill Glen, lugged bags of food and boxes of brightly wrapped gifts to vans and trucks backed up to a rear door.
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
In the age of smartphones and tablets, delivering restaurant food can be more than just taking calls, making the stuff, bagging it and sending a guy out in a rundown Toyota. On the fourth floor of a refurbished broom factory in Canton, a room full of young men in T-shirts, polo shirts and Orioles caps work at a long table laden with computers on OrderUp, a food service with a technology twist. They're busy with the further development of the technology that their company combined with logistical calculation to create a formula that's delivering in 36 markets from Maryland to California.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Caesarean sections were performed on a smaller percentage of U.S. women in 1990 than the year before, apparently halting two decades of growing reliance on the surgery, a health advocacy group reported yesterday.But Dr. Sidney M. Wolfe, director of Public Citizen's Health Research Group, estimated that nearly half the 982,000 Caesareans performed in 1990 were still unnecessary, endangering the health of both mother and child and wasting $1.3 billion in doctor and hospital fees.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Four teenagers are charged as adults with robbing and stabbing a pizza delivery driver in Essex Monday night, Baltimore County police said. Police said the teens, between 16 and 19, attacked a Pizza Boli's driver as he attempted to make a delivery in the 1100 block of Tace Drive around 11:30 p.m. The 20-year-old driver was taken to a local hospital. The manager at the Back River Neck Road restaurant said previously that the employee has been released from the hospital. Charged are Raquawn Montrel Harrison, 18, of the 900 block of Holgate Drive, Michael Frederick Powell 17, of the unit block of Helmsman Court, Davonte Montrell Eckeard, 16, of the 1400 block of Hadwick Drive in Essex and Jonathan Richard Fly, 19, of the 5200 block of King Avenue in Rosedale.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | February 8, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- Northrop Grumman Corp. yesterday posted lower-than-expected profit for the fourth quarter, hurt by fewer deliveries of the military contractor's B-2 stealth bomber.Net income was $58 million, or $1.17 a share.In 1994's final quarter, the company had a loss of $121 million, or $2.45, after taking $324 million of pretax charges for an accounting change and asset sales.Per-share results fell short of the average forecast of $1.30 from nine analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research.
BUSINESS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | November 3, 2006
Saying he cannot get The Examiner to stop throwing unwanted papers in his driveway each morning, a Baltimore lawyer has asked the Baltimore County Circuit Court for a temporary restraining order to force an end to the deliveries. "They're trespassing, technically," said Joel L. Levin, referring to the carriers who deliver the papers in his Pikesville neighborhood. Almost a month ago, he said, he began calling the paper's circulation department to have them stopped, but they keep coming.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | March 31, 2006
Early in the last century, obstetricians began to make a routine cut just outside the delivering mother's birth canal to ease the baby's entry to the outside world and prevent painful tearing of the woman's tissue. The idea seemed so logical that, by mid-century, some hospitals were performing episiotomies in the majority of deliveries. The trouble was, there was no evidence that its routine use was beneficial. Old habits die hard, but this one may finally be on the wane. Today, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists is urging doctors to spare the knife unless there is a clear medical reason to intervene.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2011
FedEx will pay $8 million to settle a lawsuit filed by a former Crofton shipping center employee accusing the company of defrauding the federal government. Mary Garofolo, who worked for FedEx for 23 years before retiring in May 2007, filed suit against the company under the federal whistle-blower statute after complaints to her supervisors about the scheme were ignored, she said. Her suit was filed under seal to enable government investigators to look into her allegations, which centered on a fraudulent billing scheme involving thousands of late deliveries that FedEx falsely blamed on 9/11-related security delays.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Lorraine Mirabella and Gus G. Sentementes and Lorraine Mirabella,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com and Lorraine. Mirabella@baltsun.com | February 9, 2010
Santoni's Super Market, an independent grocery in East Baltimore, closed early for the first time in its 80-year history Saturday afternoon after a major delivery from its supplier didn't arrive and employees couldn't get through the snow to work. The neighborhood store was able to open Sunday and Monday for limited hours only to prepare for the next wave of shoppers - and snow. Record-breaking snowfall over the weekend created a logistical nightmare for grocers as shoppers flooded the aisles to stock up for the epic storm, deliveries were hampered by road conditions, and employees were snowbound at home.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 12, 2003
TOULOUSE, France - Airbus SAS, the world's second-largest maker of commercial aircraft, delivered 303 planes to customers last year, topping its target and gaining market share on Boeing Co., people familiar with the company said. The Toulouse-based plane maker also aims to hand over 300 planes this year, which would exceed the total expected by Chicago rival Boeing by as many as 25 planes. Airbus's proportion of large commercial aircraft deliveries rose to 44 percent in 2002 from 38 percent in 2001.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
Orioles reliever Brian Matusz remembers laughing when he opened the piece of fan mail in Sarasota, Fla., last month. He immediately showed the contents of the manila envelope to Orioles head athletic trainer Richie Bancells before informing manager Buck Showalter. "I'm like, Richie, can you believe this?' Then I told Buck about it," Matusz said recently, chuckling. "That's probably the most unusual, interesting item any fan has ever asked me to sign. I thought it was hilarious.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Peter R. Godbout, owner of Dad's Delivery LLC in Baltimore, died Friday of heart failure at his Caton Avenue home. He was 62. Peter Robert Godbout was born in Washington and raised in Silver Spring. He was a 1969 graduate of Archbishop John Carroll High School in Northeast Washington, and attended the University of Maryland, College Park, before going into business. From 1971 to 2001, when he established Dad's Delivery LLC, he had had been president of World Wide Delivery in College Park.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Despite the old adage about the conditions in which U.S. Postal Service mail carriers will work, Thursday's snowstorm has disrupted delivery into this week. USPS said in a press release posted to its website last week that some mail service in the Baltimore area would be temporarily suspended due to lingering patches of snow and ice that presented a hazard for mail carriers. On Wednesday, officials apologized for "any inconvenience" with mail delivery and said service had resumed in all areas.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
Buckets of baby's breath, tulips and irises filled a walk-in cooler at Flowers by Gina D. on Thursday. Vases were wrapped with pink ribbons, and teddy bears and greeting cards stood ready for purchase. Missing were the four drivers who had been scheduled to make about 100 deliveries the day before Valentine's Day, leaving the store scrambling during its most lucrative time of the year. "Some of my drivers can't even get out of their street," said Regina Davis, who owns the shop on North Charles Street with her husband, Jonathan.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
When 89-year-old Waunita Ohler had to make three calls this winter to her propane supplier for emergency deliveries to avoid running out, the Elkridge mobile home park resident knew there was a problem. What she didn't realize was its scale: A national shortage caused by what some call a "perfect storm" of factors has affected millions and sent prices soaring by more than two-thirds. "Deliveries have been late in the past, but never have I run out of gas this way," said Ohler, who has used propane for cooking and to heat her home for 28 years.
NEWS
By Martin O'Malley | January 11, 2014
Beyond the political debates over the Affordable Care Act is a bipartisan consensus about the future of our nation's health care system. Across the political spectrum, officials and experts agree that we must shift from a near exclusive focus on treating people when they get sick to a balanced approach that also promotes health and wellness. Such a shift will both reduce costs for families and small businesses and keep many Americans from dying of preventable causes. Our health care system's heavy reliance on "fee-for-service financing" generates lackluster outcomes, despite ever-increasing costs.
NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | November 23, 1990
FREDERICK -- Traditionally, the holiday sights and sounds of downtown Frederick's historic district have been a mixture of Christmas cheer, rumbling and grumbling.The cheer is created by the ambience of shopping in the city's specialty shops. The rumbling has been the sound of dozens of trucks making deliveries to merchants.The grumbling has been from motorists, forced to weave in and out of the double-parked trucks or stuck behind trucks in an irritating traffic jam.Now, city officials have delivered an early Christmas present to frustrated downtown drivers with a new law that prohibits double-parking on Market Street, one of the city's main thoroughfares.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 13, 1993
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- In a move that appeared to have been prompted by the Clinton administration's policy statement this week on the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina, the Bosnian government announced yesterday that it would refuse to accept any further deliveries of United Nations food and medical aid to Sarajevo until U.N. relief convoys begin regular deliveries to besieged Muslims in eastern Bosnia.The announcement, blocking virtually the only food and medicine reaching this besieged city, was made less than 36 hours after Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher outlined a new, tougher U.S. policy on Bosnia.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella | December 18, 2013
Consumers who want guaranteed Christmas delivery on their online purchases better act fast. Most retailers -- 84.2 percent -- say guaranteed delivery for the holiday will end before Dec. 20, according to Shop.org's eHoliday survey, completed by Prosper Insights & Analytics. And nearly three quarters of online sellers plan to end free shipping promotions on or before Dec. 20th. "With Christmas falling on a Wednesday this year, we expect to see numerous offers from retailers for expedited and express shipping as we head into the final stretch and potentially biggest weekend of the holiday season," said Vicki Cantrell, executive director of Shop.org.
NEWS
By David Horsey | December 10, 2013
Jeff Bezos' announcement that Amazon hopes to eventually deliver packages to customers using little flying drones has caused a mini-uproar. From journalists to members of Congress, people are telling Bezos, "Wait just a gosh darn minute, mister!" Among those forwarding legislation to deal with the issue is Rep. Ted Poe (R-Texas). In comments on the floor of the House of Representatives, Mr. Poe said, "Think of how many drones could soon be flying around the sky. Here a drone, there a drone, everywhere a drone in the United States.
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