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January 10, 2012
Perhaps the fourth time is the charm, as 21 Main Street is once again home to a delicatessen in Reisterstown. Bubb's opened it doors back on Sept. 12 and is serving the most diverse crowds I've seen grace the neighborhood, with an equally diverse menu. Owners Karrol and Ronnie Kowitz and Joe and Nancy Kowitz are no strangers to the food and beverage industry. The off-spring of Holocaust survivors Ben and Shirley Kowitz, the family began its career in corner grocery stores referred to as "Superettes.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
Royal Farms is appealing a decision by Annapolis officials that put a halt to the company's plan to move into a historic building at City Dock. The company has sought to open a delicatessen at the former site of Stevens Hardware at 142 Dock St., but city planners say it's a convenience store, not a deli — and thus is not allowed under current zoning. The Annapolis Board of Appeals will hold a hearing on the issue March 4. Royal Farms applied for a special zoning exception to allow a delicatessen last year.
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NEWS
August 17, 1995
A gunman robbed a Parole delicatessen Tuesday morning of an undisclosed amount of money, Anne Arundel County police said.The man walked into the Saucy Salamander Eatery in the 2300 block of Forest Drive about 9 a.m. He showed the clerk a gun he had in his waistband and ordered her to give him all the money from the cash register, police said.The man ran from the store toward Riva Road. The clerk was not able to get a detailed description of the gunman, police said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
Herbert A. Caplan, whose Randallstown delicatessen kept hungry customers coming back for the Herbwood, Bubbie's Special and the Three Stooges, died June 26 of pancreatic cancer at his Pikesville home. He was 84. The youngest of nine children of a wallpaper hanger and a homemaker, Herbert Allan Caplan was born in Baltimore and raised on Pulaski Street. As a youth, he played in Easterwood Park and later became a member of the Easterwood Boys Club, family members said. A 1946 graduate of Merganthaler Vocational-Technical High School, Mr. Caplan was drafted into the Army in 1951, serving in Korea with an infantry unit.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1996
The Annapolis City Council will consider tonight a proposal by the former owner of Harbour House restaurant to expand the Food Basket on Dock Street into a delicatessen.Aldermen will hear testimony for the application by George Phillips to expand his store into a 10-seat delicatessen that would offer sandwiches and other light fare from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday through Friday, and 6 a.m. to midnight Saturdays.The store, at Dock and Craig streets, sells food, gifts itemsand teas. The proposal also includes offering carryout meals.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 30, 1992
Imagine an episode of "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" shot in sepia and set in the very, very damp future about an ex-clown whose meat-packed bones become the objects of desire for a cannibalistic delicatessen owner while various squads of rubber-clad commandos wage guerrilla warfare in the sewers. If you can imagine that, then you don't have to see "Delicatessen," opening today at the Charles. But if you can't, you'd better go see it.The movie, take it from me, is a lot more fun to sit through than to describe in a single sentence.
NEWS
June 25, 2002
Melvin Edward Prietz, a retired delicatessen owner and meat salesman, died Friday of cancer at Flagler Memorial Hospital in Flagler Beach, Fla., where he moved 10 years ago from Abingdon. He was 73. The owner of Doc's Delicatessen at Chesterfield and Mannasota avenues in Northeast Baltimore, he later became a salesman for Maryland Hotel Supply Co. and Broadway Meats. Born in Baltimore and raised on Chesterfield Avenue, he was a 1947 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. He served in the Marine Corps from 1948 to 1952.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2005
Jack Goldenson, a former East Lombard Street delicatessen owner who once had dreams of his business becoming a Jewish McDonald's, died at a nursing home in Scottsdale, Ariz., Feb. 8 of complications from heart surgery performed in October. The former Towson resident was 77. A native of Lublin, Poland, Mr. Goldenson lost his parents and five siblings to World War II and concentration camps. As a 13-year-old orphan, he traveled alone - and often hungry - through parts of Russia, Persia, Pakistan and Palestine before coming to New York in 1946, he told an Evening Sun reporter years later.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1999
Lorrine E. McLellan, who with her husband had operated a neighborhood delicatessen in Idlewylde, died Saturday at St. Joseph Medical Center after a long illness. She was 82 and a resident of Idlewylde.In 1948, she and her husband, Warren, were raising three children on his salary when they decided to buy a feed store at 6320 Sherwood Road in Baltimore County and convert it into a delicatessen, seeing the venture as a way to assure financial stability.They borrowed money from relatives and sold all of their furniture to finance the purchase and opened McLellan's Delicatessen.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1996
If the Jewish family deli survives, it may one day have to thank the brisket at Martin Lev's Edmart Delicatessen in Pikesville. For it was there that the oven-roasted beef of L. John Harris' mother met its match.Harris, 49, is the director of the Deli Project, a national exploration into the history and success of the Jewish food phenomenon once so central to many neighborhood shopping districts. The project is being directed by the Judah Magnes Museum of Berkeley, Calif., in collaboration with the Jewish Historical Society of Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | January 25, 2013
The owners of Jewish-style delicatessens in San Francisco and Baltimore have placed a friendly wager on the Super Bowl game. The losing deli will donate $500 to a charity of choice in the winning team's city. The bet between Miller's East Coast Delicatessen in San Francisco and Attman's Deli in Baltimore was the idea of Robby Morgenstern of Miller's, who made, and won, a similar bet with a Detroit deli owner on the outcome of the 2012 World Series. The Baltimore deli's owner, Marc Attman, accepted the bet with Miller's.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2012
The many good reasons to check out Miller's Deli in the Greenspring Shopping Center are written on the restaurant's wall. The big menu lists items that can carry you from breakfast through dinner. And liver and onions ($9.99), well, Miller's has that, too. The deep, foamy plastic plate felt like it weighed five pounds. On it, buried under easily a heaping cup of translucent onion strips, were two fairly thin slabs of fried liver, about six inches long and 4 inches wide. But let's talk mashed potatoes, which came with the platter.
EXPLORE
January 10, 2012
Perhaps the fourth time is the charm, as 21 Main Street is once again home to a delicatessen in Reisterstown. Bubb's opened it doors back on Sept. 12 and is serving the most diverse crowds I've seen grace the neighborhood, with an equally diverse menu. Owners Karrol and Ronnie Kowitz and Joe and Nancy Kowitz are no strangers to the food and beverage industry. The off-spring of Holocaust survivors Ben and Shirley Kowitz, the family began its career in corner grocery stores referred to as "Superettes.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2010
Lenny's Delicatessen will open next spring in the Pratt Street Pavilion of Harborplace, in the first-level restaurant space formerly occupied by California Pizza Kitchen. Representatives of Harborplace and the Gallery announced today that Lenny's Delicatessen is one of two tenants coming to Harborplace and the Gallery in the spring. The second is Francesca's Collection, a women's boutique that will open its first Baltimore-area location on the first level of the Gallery at Harborplace.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 24, 2010
Andrea Louis Mastellone, whose Italian delicatessen and wine shop in Parkville was a destination for decades for lovers of the cheeses, meats, pastas, pastries and Mediterranean wines that filled its shelves and cases, died Feb. 17 of a stroke at Franklin Square Hospital Center. The Perry Hall resident was 85. Mr. Mastellone was born and raised in Meta di Sorrento, near Naples, Italy. He was a graduate of the Nautical Institute and served in the Italian merchant marine during World War II. After the war, he immigrated to Coney Island, N.Y., where he lived briefly with relatives before moving in 1947 to Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | December 25, 2008
1019 E. Lombard St., 410-563-2666. Open 8 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays, 8 a.m-5 p.m. Sundays Good Jewish delicatessen that it is, Attman's is open today, Christmas Day, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. December is busy at the deli as exiles return to the old East Lombard Street neighborhood for the palaver and the pastrami. There is often a line of customers stretching along the counter, all the way to the back of the narrow front room. You can sit at the few tables in the adjoining Kibbitz Room, or you can take out, but first you have to order.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
Thomas Gordon Curran, who owned delicatessens and was a member of a family prominent in Northeast Baltimore political circles, died Sunday of complications from pneumonia and Alzheimer's disease at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 72. A resident of Northeast Baltimore's Beverly Hills neighborhood for many decades, he moved to Carney three years ago. Born in Baltimore and raised on Garrett Avenue, he attended Loyola High School, City College and the University of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | October 11, 2006
Stanley A. "Steve" Ambridge, who owned a Dundalk bakery and delicatessen and later collected state income taxes, died of cancer Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Cockeysville resident was 92. He was born Stelios Arambiges in Filbert, W.Va., two months after his parents emigrated from Greece - having fled Turkey in the turbulent and bloody years preceding the Greco-Turkish War. As a young man, he lived in Steubenville, Ohio, and worked in a liquor store alongside Dino Paul Crocetti, who did singing imitations of Bing Crosby at local social events where the young Mr. Arambiges was master of ceremonies.
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