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NEWS
January 7, 2013
In Gerald Stansbury's commentary ("Unrepresentative committee blocks Md. death penalty repeal vote," Jan. 2), he implies that four of members of the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee members who voted "no" on allowing the death penalty to go to a floor vote did so because they are white and from Baltimore County and do not represent those most affected - people of color. Mr. Stansbury states that "this racial bias has no place in public policy," as he sees it from his position as president of the NAACP Maryland State Conference.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2014
Jurors are set to resume deliberations Wednesday in the case of a New Jersey police officer accused of shooting a man to death last summer on the side of a Millersville highway. Joseph Lamont Walker, 41, is charged with first-degree murder in the death of 36-year-old Joseph Dale Harvey Jr. on Route 3. Walker was driving home from a birthday party for a nephew last June when his car drifted into Harvey's lane. Harvey shouted and swerved toward Walker's car, and both men pulled over.
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NEWS
By Bryan P. Sears, Towson Times | July 7, 2010
The first full day of deliberations in the murder trial of Mary C. Koontz was marked by two rounds of questions from the jury — including queries about whether she had purchased a return trip to Florida, who would pay for her psychiatric care if she were sent to an institution and a timeline of voice mails she left on her husband's answering machine. Koontz is charged with first-degree murder in the shooting death June 19 last year of her estranged husband, Ronald G. Koontz, and with the attempted murder of her daughter, Kelsey Koontz, who was 16 at the time.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | May 29, 2014
An Anne Arundel County judge heard closing arguments Wednesday in the case against a Howard County police officer charged with assault in connection with a June 2013 wrong-way collision in Anne Arundel that injured a family of four. Circuit Court Judge Paul F. Harris Jr., who is presiding over the trial, said he will deliver his decision on June 23.  The officer, Symchay Kon Bendu, 29, of North Laurel, faces four counts of second-degree assault, a reckless driving charge and a negligent driving charge in connection with the June 8 accident, which occurred on a one-way road that connects Route 100 eastbound to Route 10 southbound.  The accident in question, during which Bendu's cruiser was T-boned as he attempted to make a U-turn, was preceded an hour earlier by another accident in Anne Arundel involving Bendu.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan | nick.madigan@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
The attorney defending a man accused of raping a woman at gunpoint told a jury Thursday that the accuser was most likely a prostitute whose story about the attack should not be believed. "It was a business deal that went wrong," the lawyer, Ivan J. Bates, said in Baltimore County Circuit Court in the trial of Rhasaan Harcum, 31, who was charged along with another man with abducting, beating and sexually assaulting the woman Sept. 28, 2000, in a Gwynn Oak park. "For all we know, she's a prostitute."
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2010
To prosecutors, Lamont Davis is a cold-hearted 17-year-old who fired into a crowded Baltimore street last July to settle a childish battle, without a care for the innocent people standing within his "danger zone." To his defense team, he's a troubled teen who is wrongly accused of a shooting that left a little girl — Raven Wyatt, now 6 — in a wheelchair, unable to properly walk or talk, with a bullet lodged in her brain. But jurors did not immediately adopt either side's version of the truth.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2011
Jurors in the trial of twin brothers Travers and Tremayne Johnson, accused of setting a pit bull on fire in 2009, will resume deliberation next week, after twice indicating Friday that they were having trouble reaching an agreement. Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Lawrence P. Fletcher-Hill gave the struggling jury an "Allen Charge" instruction Friday afternoon to help bring them to a consensus and avoid a mistrial. The Allen Charge typically urges jurors to continue deliberations and reconsider their individual views if they're in the minority.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
Jury deliberations began Wednesday in the death-penalty trial of a convicted murderer charged with killing a correctional officer at the now-closed House of Correction. If the Anne Arundel County jury convicts Lee Edward "Shy" Stephens in the July 2006 stabbing of Cpl. David McGuinn, he could become the first person sentenced to death under Maryland's new capital punishment law. The three-week trial featured 10 prisoners testifying as eyewitnesses for both the prosecution and defense, giving jurors a peek into life at a troubled maximum-security prison where investigators found hundreds of homemade weapons in the aftermath of the slaying — but no murder weapon.
SPORTS
May 7, 1991
NEW YORK (AP) -- George Steinbrenner fabricated theattempted extortion case against Howard Spira, an admitted gambler, because he wanted to protect his position in baseball, Spira's lawyer said yesterday in closing arguments."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | January 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Politicians who get themselves elected to the Senate often begin to take themselves pretty seriously. There are, after all, only 100 of them, so it's easy to get puffed up with self-importance. But this Senate's decision to conduct talks concerning President Clinton's impeachment trial behind closed doors shows how out of touch its members are with the real world. The political insularity of the Republicans -- they were the ones who made the decision -- boggles the mind.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
It's not every day that a law professor has his book quoted by the Supreme Court, and so the University of Baltimore's Michael I. Meyerson was understandably intrigued when his 2012 work about the Framers' views on religion made it into Monday's decision on public prayer. But the plug from Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, who wrote the majority opinion, was somewhat bittersweet. Meyerson says the decision misread the point of his book and took the quote out of context in a way that allowed the justices to draw an entirely different conclusion about how the Founding Fathers approached religion in public.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Jurors began deliberations Friday in the trial of two Baltimore police officers accused of assaulting a man during a 2011 drug arrest in which the suspect attempted to hide in the home of one officer's girlfriend. Sgt. Marinos N. Gialamas and Officer Anthony Williams were charged after the drug arrest of Antoine Douglas Green, who police said ran from officers and broke into the home of Williams' girlfriend in the 2200 block of Prentiss Place in East Baltimore. Prosecutors said Green was assaulted by officers in the kitchen after he was brought back into the home in handcuffs.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
Members of a Baltimore jury were reminded on Thursday to act civil toward each other as they continue to deliberate a murder and murder conspiracy trial that has kept them in close quarters for four days. Thursday afternoon, a jury of eight black women, two black men, a white man and a white woman walked into the Baltimore City Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown's courtroom and sat down for a lecture on decorum. The jurors had been debating the fates of three men who allegedly reacted to the killing of a family member by taking revenge on people throughout a neighborhood block.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | November 8, 2013
The former aide at the  Maryland School for the Deaf  accused of groping seven female students denied the allegations on the witness stand in  Howard County  Circuit Court on Friday. Clarence Taylor III, who is deaf, will have to wait until at least Tuesday for a verdict from the jury, which recessed at 4:30 p.m. Friday, on the seven counts of child sex abuse he is facing. Earlier on Friday, which was the 10th day of the trial, three counts of child pornography were dropped by the State's Attorney's office.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Jurors are expected to begin deliberating Monday whether Karla Porter is guilty of premeditated murder for hiring a man to kill her husband, or of a lesser charge because she was acting in self-defense. Porter, 51, is charged with first-degree murder in the death of her husband of 24 years, William "Ray" Porter. He was shot to death March 1, 2010, at the Towson gas station he owned after prosecutors said his wife offered to pay an Essex man $9,000. The hit man, William Bishop, was previously convicted in the murder and is serving a life sentence.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 31, 2013
Fire investigators and police are seeking information about whomever set several small fires on the lawn of an Edgewood home on Thursday evening. The Abingdon Volunteer Fire Company was called at 6:50 p.m. for a report of a fire on the lawn of a single family home in the 400 block of Winterberry Drive. According to a notice of investigation from the Maryland State Fire Marshal's Office, the fire was brought quickly under control by five firefighters who responded. No monetary damage was reported.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2005
Jason A. Shapiro, Gray's attorney, told the jury yesterday that his client's only crime was helping dispose of the corpse. In Williams trial, he testified that he saw Gray choke and kill Hughes.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
Lawyers on both sides of the Phylicia Barnes murder trial acknowledged the circumstantial evidence against Michael Maurice Johnson in closing arguments Monday. But while defense attorneys described flaws and inconsistencies, prosecutors said the facts point to Johnson as the only reasonable suspect. "It's not one thing," Assistant State's Attorney Lisa Goldberg told jurors. "It's everything. " Jurors began deliberating on those details in the 10th day of the trial, despite a second attempt from defense attorneys to get an early acquittal.
NEWS
January 7, 2013
In Gerald Stansbury's commentary ("Unrepresentative committee blocks Md. death penalty repeal vote," Jan. 2), he implies that four of members of the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee members who voted "no" on allowing the death penalty to go to a floor vote did so because they are white and from Baltimore County and do not represent those most affected - people of color. Mr. Stansbury states that "this racial bias has no place in public policy," as he sees it from his position as president of the NAACP Maryland State Conference.
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