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By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1996
DELFT, the Netherlands - The inn where Johannes Vermeer was born is long gone, the building replaced by one now with a shuttered computer store. His house and studio were demolished more than a century ago. But Vermeer, the 17th-century master, still inhabits the town, much as the town will forever inhabit his work.In Vermeer's "View from Delft," one of his most famous works, the town's orange tile roofs sparkle in the sun. They still do. In the painting, the harbor could be mistaken for open sea. As it still can. After a three-month stay at the National Gallery in Washington, the painting has returned home to The Hague, five miles north of its namesake.
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CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
John and Leila Juracek's British friends tell them their 1929 Tudor Revival house in Baltimore's Homeland neighborhood is more like an English cottage than the country cottages in England. The L-shaped exterior is of 18-inch-thick stone dressed in ivy and topped with a second-story, timber and stucco construction. Formal gardens grace the back of the home, while inside, leaded-glass mullioned windows with chintz and toile draperies, solid traditional furniture and needlepoint rugs impart a heady sense of living on the pages of an Agatha Christie novel.
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FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | September 28, 1997
I have a Mission-style wooden wall clock with an eight-day wind and a brass pendulum. Pasted on the back is a label with printed instructions and the name "The National Clock & Mfg. Co., Chicago, Ill." What can you tell me about it?The plain, rectangular Mission style dates your clock to about 1910. The National Clock & Manufacturing Co. in Chicago sold clocks but did not manufacture them. It sold clocks made by some famous companies, including Ingraham and Sessions.I have a figurine of three little girls in Dutch costumes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 18, 2001
A young woman in an elegant dress stands before a heavy, mullioned-glass window whose leaded panes admit a cool, pure light that bathes the room and its contents in limpid color. In front of the woman, on a table draped with richly woven Oriental carpet, a silver pitcher and tray sit next to a carved jewelry box whose open lid reveals a knotted blue ribbon tied to a delicate string of pearls. Behind the woman, a golden-hued map hangs on the smoothly plastered wall. Who is this young woman, and what action has our intrusion interrupted?
NEWS
September 29, 1990
Services for Johannes J. Wieringa, an accountant, will be held at 8 p.m. today at the A. Allan Seitz Funeral Home, 3818 Roland Ave.Mr. Wieringa, who lived on Roland Heights Avenue, died early yesterday at Union Memorial Hospital after a heart attack. He was 70.He retired in 1982 as a financial administrator for First Fidelity Savings and Loan Association. Earlier, he was an accountant for the Arundel Corp. In recent years, he did accounting work for several clients.Born in Indonesia, he received his college education there.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
John and Leila Juracek's British friends tell them their 1929 Tudor Revival house in Baltimore's Homeland neighborhood is more like an English cottage than the country cottages in England. The L-shaped exterior is of 18-inch-thick stone dressed in ivy and topped with a second-story, timber and stucco construction. Formal gardens grace the back of the home, while inside, leaded-glass mullioned windows with chintz and toile draperies, solid traditional furniture and needlepoint rugs impart a heady sense of living on the pages of an Agatha Christie novel.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | December 10, 1995
We think we know why Vermeer's serenely beautiful paintings move us, why it is we respond to them. They are superficially so straightforward -- one or two people in a room engaged in a mundane activity -- that we assume our entrancement is simply explained.It's the light, we think, or the quiet, or the crispness of the fabrics, or the way the artist could paint a pearl. Or maybe we yearn for a time as peaceful and uncomplicated as these paintings seem to reflect.But those who have organized the exhibit "Johannes Vermeer" at Washington's National Gallery and written its excellent catalog are here to teach us that what we're responding to is far more than that, even though we may not be conscious of it. Underlying those "simple" pictures is an art of subtlety and depth that exerts its spell on us in complex ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 18, 2001
A young woman in an elegant dress stands before a heavy, mullioned-glass window whose leaded panes admit a cool, pure light that bathes the room and its contents in limpid color. In front of the woman, on a table draped with richly woven Oriental carpet, a silver pitcher and tray sit next to a carved jewelry box whose open lid reveals a knotted blue ribbon tied to a delicate string of pearls. Behind the woman, a golden-hued map hangs on the smoothly plastered wall. Who is this young woman, and what action has our intrusion interrupted?
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | June 2, 1991
Less than a month after the antiques world reeled at the high prices paid for French porcelains at the sale of the collection of the late Elizabeth Parke Firestone, more plebeian 18th century English pottery brought astonishing high prices as well. There is no recession in the market for antique pottery and porcelain.A Sevres porcelain billiard score marker sold for a whopping $99,000 at the Firestone sale on March 22 at Christie's in New York. The 16 1/4 -inch plaque decorated in a trompe l'oeil technique to simulate a marble bracket had a royal provenance: the billiard room at Versailles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | October 26, 1995
Consider America's love affair with dough. Raw chocolate chip cookie dough. (They even put it in luxury ice cream.) Fried dough. Doughnuts. Thick-crust pizza. How can pannekoeken miss?These huge Dutch pancakes are the specialty of Fells Point's newest wacky little eatery, the Pan Handle. Soft, chewy and irresistibly doughy, the 16-inch pannekoek comes on a giant blue-and-white Delft plate sliced like pizza, with a choice of 101 toppings.Actually there are only about five toppings (OK, maybe a few more than five)
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | September 28, 1997
I have a Mission-style wooden wall clock with an eight-day wind and a brass pendulum. Pasted on the back is a label with printed instructions and the name "The National Clock & Mfg. Co., Chicago, Ill." What can you tell me about it?The plain, rectangular Mission style dates your clock to about 1910. The National Clock & Manufacturing Co. in Chicago sold clocks but did not manufacture them. It sold clocks made by some famous companies, including Ingraham and Sessions.I have a figurine of three little girls in Dutch costumes.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1996
DELFT, the Netherlands - The inn where Johannes Vermeer was born is long gone, the building replaced by one now with a shuttered computer store. His house and studio were demolished more than a century ago. But Vermeer, the 17th-century master, still inhabits the town, much as the town will forever inhabit his work.In Vermeer's "View from Delft," one of his most famous works, the town's orange tile roofs sparkle in the sun. They still do. In the painting, the harbor could be mistaken for open sea. As it still can. After a three-month stay at the National Gallery in Washington, the painting has returned home to The Hague, five miles north of its namesake.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | December 10, 1995
We think we know why Vermeer's serenely beautiful paintings move us, why it is we respond to them. They are superficially so straightforward -- one or two people in a room engaged in a mundane activity -- that we assume our entrancement is simply explained.It's the light, we think, or the quiet, or the crispness of the fabrics, or the way the artist could paint a pearl. Or maybe we yearn for a time as peaceful and uncomplicated as these paintings seem to reflect.But those who have organized the exhibit "Johannes Vermeer" at Washington's National Gallery and written its excellent catalog are here to teach us that what we're responding to is far more than that, even though we may not be conscious of it. Underlying those "simple" pictures is an art of subtlety and depth that exerts its spell on us in complex ways.
NEWS
September 29, 1990
Services for Johannes J. Wieringa, an accountant, will be held at 8 p.m. today at the A. Allan Seitz Funeral Home, 3818 Roland Ave.Mr. Wieringa, who lived on Roland Heights Avenue, died early yesterday at Union Memorial Hospital after a heart attack. He was 70.He retired in 1982 as a financial administrator for First Fidelity Savings and Loan Association. Earlier, he was an accountant for the Arundel Corp. In recent years, he did accounting work for several clients.Born in Indonesia, he received his college education there.
FEATURES
By Patricia Chargot and Patricia Chargot,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 20, 1998
Wooden shoes were worn in many parts of Europe for hundreds of years, especially in the Netherlands, which has a lot of marshy farmland. Some people still wear them. The heavy shoes don't look like they'd be comfortable, but they are - in a strange way. And they make a funny sound like horses clomping.Wooden shoes are also called clogs. Clogs were worn mainly for work, but special shoes were made for going to church and weddings. In the Netherlands today, clogs are still worn in steel ,, factories, on fishing boats and on farms.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2010
Stephanie and Jerry Weiss are such prolific world travelers — they even lived abroad for a time — that when it came time to consider a place to spend retirement, they were in a quandary. "We looked in Panama, Costa Rica, Italy, Holland, Florida [and] we couldn't make up our minds," said Stephanie Weiss, a 70-year old retired art teacher. "'For all of our looking, nothing fit the bill." It was soon after an extended stay in the historic international arts town of San Miguel de Allende in Mexico, that the couple happened upon a spacious corner residence in the Charlestown retirement community, where Jerry Weiss, 80, a retired Protestant minister, had many friends who were also retired clergymen.
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